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Old 09-03-2012, 04:08 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by trudinator

Only use soap when brand new to remove the oils from manufacturing, which are not food safe.
That is what the Lodge store manager said.
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Old 09-25-2012, 07:47 PM   #22
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We have several cast iron skillets. I never use soap when finished using them. I make a point to "re-season" the skillets once a year if they haven't been used for a while. I wipe a thin coat of vegetable oil on the inside and outside of the pan. Place them face down on aluminum foil in a 350 degree oven for about 1 1/2 hrs., turn the oven off and let the pans cool down. I store the pans with a sheet of paper towel between the pans. Store the pans in a dry area...Also, temperature changes to the cast iron should be gradual. Sudden hot/cold changes can fracture the cast iron. Proper care...cast iron can be passed to the next generation.
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Old 09-25-2012, 08:06 PM   #23
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I have a couple Dutch Ovens that haven't been used in a while, they have a bit of a rancid smell. What's the best way to recondition them? If stripping the seasoning is the way to go, what is the best way to clean the seasoning off?
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Old 09-25-2012, 08:10 PM   #24
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I have a couple Dutch Ovens that haven't been used in a while, they have a bit of a rancid smell. What's the best way to recondition them? If stripping the seasoning is the way to go, what is the best way to clean the seasoning off?
I just sand blasted my skillet and re seasoned ... worked very well .
ps I just sandblasted the inner surface.

steel wool also works well and of course a lot of elbow grease .
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Old 09-25-2012, 08:13 PM   #25
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I just sand blasted my skillet and re seasoned ... worked very well .
ps I just sandblasted the inner surface.

steel wool also works well and of course a lot of elbow grease .
Did you sandblast or beadblast. I use glass beads in my blaster, it does a good job and doesn't pit the surfaces. Works great on alum.
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Old 09-25-2012, 08:15 PM   #26
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I have a couple Dutch Ovens that haven't been used in a while, they have a bit of a rancid smell. What's the best way to recondition them? If stripping the seasoning is the way to go, what is the best way to clean the seasoning off?
Google "cleaning rancid oil from cast iron pans". There are several links that you may find helpful. Looks like cleaning and reseasoning will be required to do it properly. Good luck!
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Old 09-25-2012, 08:35 PM   #27
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Did you sandblast or beadblast. I use glass beads in my blaster, it does a good job and doesn't pit the surfaces. Works great on alum.
glass media
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Old 09-25-2012, 08:48 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Mad4sax

I have several cast iron pans I use all the time. You could fry an egg in them and it won't stick.

What I do is cover them with a thin layer of Crisco (the white stuff in a can). I put them on the back part of my grill and just leave them as I grill several times. I will re-apply the crisco a couple of times.

I do have a large grill and grill more than most, so it doesn't take long for the seasoning process.
X2 - Crisco
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:58 AM   #29
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We use quite a few cast iron items (Dutch ovens, skillets of several sizes, griddles, etc) We used a varietys of shortnings over the years, but now we just use sprays. (Like mazzola spray) I keep a can nearby and use it as a final wipe while the item is still hot.

Several of our pieces were my grandmothers from the 1920's. I'd put them up against any modern "Non-stick" cook ware in the market.
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