Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-09-2011, 12:06 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Norman, OK
Posts: 40
So, it sounds as everyone agrees that it is a CG electrical issue, and NOT an AC or inside the trailer mechanical problelm.

Thats puts me at ease a bit......until it is 130 degrees in the trailer!! Oh, the fun!
__________________

__________________
Travis * Norman, OK
- 2011 Forest River Rockwood 8285WS 5er - FOR SALE!!
- F350 Crew Cab Dually Diesel King Ranch
- See 'ya on the road! Typically on 146.520 for the other traveling hams!
farrelltravis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2011, 10:32 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
jimh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Lake Charles, La.
Posts: 1,531
generally, if it is a problem in the park, u won't be alone.
that probably doesn't make u any cooler....
__________________

__________________
jimh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2011, 12:24 AM   #13
Member
 
skgeorgy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 92
Breakers exist in trailers in houses and trailers to protect the wiring inside of them from overheating and starting a fire. They are not for protecting devices from overloading. An a/c breaker shouldn't trip due to it working hard. There are fuses and other things in the device to prevent it from over loading. An a/c unit is rated for 20 amps shouldn't be able to run at more than that without the motor overloads kicking in first. The a/c unit will only cool the ambient air to I think around 20-25 degrees cooler than ambient air. So if it is 105 degrees out. You will be lucky if your trailer can get to 70 or 75 degrees. I have to agree that there is probably something wrong with the campground supplying the power. My guess is power surges and or voltage drop. There is no such thing as amperage drop.
Voltage drop can occur if demand is too much from the source or the campground supply.
Sorry if I rambled but I am a journeyman electrician and trying to explain it without getting to technical. Sorry if it doesn't make sense. Talking is easier than typing.
__________________
Stephen Georgy
2011 Lacrosse 318BHS
2006 F-350
]
[SIGPIC]
skgeorgy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2011, 01:25 AM   #14
Member
 
skgeorgy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 92
Just though of a way to simplify the a/c overloading thing. If one covers the nozzle of a vacuum you notice the motor start of over work. Usually on fixes the obstruction before you break the vacuum. If you don't clear the obstruction the vacuum would burn out way before the breaker trips. Another way to look at is at home if one has a in window air conditioner. If the unit is too small for the room it is in, the room stays warm. No matter how hard the unit works. It could be going 24/7 trying to keep the room cool. The unit would fail before the house breaker trips. Electrical appliances are designed to not exceed its source capacity. If it is output is 15 amps it will not exceed 15 amps.
Hope this helps.
__________________
skgeorgy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2011, 10:43 AM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 66
At the risk of trying to over-simplify....

Any electrical device, such as an A/C unit, requires a relatively constant amount of *power* to do the work asked of it. For electricity:

Watts (power) = amps x volts

Since volts is typically considered a constant, then devices can be rated according to their amp demand; which is how breakers are sized. This works 99.9% of the time.

However, if the voltage drops, then to maintain constant *power*, the amp draw must rise. Small changes usually go unnoticed as most devices have some tolerance to different voltages.

But, if the voltage drops enough (such as when trying to supply a whole park full of AC units), then the amp draw through your post will go up and can exceed your breaker rating.

An earlier post noted that, at higher temperatures, refrigerant requires more work (power) to compress it. I hadn't thought of that before, but if an electrical device is asked to do more work, then it will draw more amps through the post.
__________________
Keith & Liz
2010 SilverBack 33L
2009 F-250
kablair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2011, 11:09 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: South Louisiana
Posts: 338
Attempted to delete my post with no luck. Corrected post follows.
__________________
Kirk, KN1B
2013 Cardinal 3800FL
2009 GMC 3500HD CC LB SRW
kbrown1075 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2011, 11:10 AM   #17
Member
 
skgeorgy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 92
Thanks kablair for that. It was stuck in the back of my head and couldn't type it out. lol. Late night insomnia postings.
__________________
skgeorgy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2011, 11:12 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: South Louisiana
Posts: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by kablair View Post
At the risk of trying to over-simplify....

Any electrical device, such as an A/C unit, requires a relatively constant amount of *power* to do the work asked of it. For electricity:

Watts (power) = amps x volts

Since volts is typically considered a constant, then devices can be rated according to their amp demand; which is how breakers are sized. This works 99.9% of the time.

However, if the voltage drops, then to maintain constant *power*, the amp draw must rise. Small changes usually go unnoticed as most devices have some tolerance to different voltages.

But, if the voltage drops enough (such as when trying to supply a whole park full of AC units), then the amp draw through your post will go up and can exceed your breaker rating.

An earlier post noted that, at higher temperatures, refrigerant requires more work (power) to compress it. I hadn't thought of that before, but if an electrical device is asked to do more work, then it will draw more amps through the post.

Thanks for this post. As I was reading the thread, this is all I had in mind. At the house, we kept blowing a capacitor in the DW's wine cooler and the DirecTV receiver would reset every once in a while. I took my Digital Volt Meter (DVM) and was measuring 108VAC (RMS). Problem found, now the fix. I called one of my buddies from the City Utilities and told him what I found. They came right over and what they found was that the transformer that we were feeding from had 5 houses on it and the transformer was over 40 years old. The transformer was there before everyone had AC in their houses, so when everyone was running their stuff, we were getting "brown power" (low voltage) which appliances needed more amps to produce the needed power. The wine cooler's cap couldn't handle the amp draw and would pop. The sat receiver would start to have a problem around 110VAC (I was familiar with the sat tv issue from my marine electronics days). The city utilities upgraded the transformer to a 35KW and now no more brown power. When it is cool out and there isn't much draw, I read about 122VAC at my new UPS with voltage input/output display and about 116VAC when it is hot and all the houses are running AC.

One other thing that can cause the breaker to trip in different places is a weak contact in the plug at the CG pedestal. If you have to use an extension from the standard 25 ft power cord, that can also cause a voltage drop, hence higher amperage draw. Gotta love Ohms and Watts. Great Laws (Ohm's law and Watt's Law)
__________________

__________________
Kirk, KN1B
2013 Cardinal 3800FL
2009 GMC 3500HD CC LB SRW
kbrown1075 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
breaker

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:20 AM.