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Old 12-06-2014, 07:15 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Evereddie View Post
That's great but what are you doing about a Propane gas detector.
I've looked for a propane detector that is battery powered but it appears that they take too much power to have a useful battery life. I found one that runs on 120 volts with a battery backup and downloaded the manual, which stated that battery is good for about a day.

I will probably get a dedicated RV propane detector that that runs on 12 volts. At least I will have a more reliable CO detector. Unfortunately, I think the majority of false alarms have been by the LP side of the combined LP/CO detector, so I may not be making progress in that aspect.

Here's the web page for the explosive gas detector. You can download the manual there. It would be nice for your house if you have gas, or for your RV if you always have it plugged in. Just don't forget to remove the battery when you unplug.

Kidde KN-COEG-3 - Nighthawk AC Plug-in Operated Carbon Monoxide and Explosive Gas Alarm
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Old 12-06-2014, 07:33 AM   #32
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I am not suggesting that you do not get a Propane detector but at least you can smell propane but you can not smell CO.

Does any one know how may years the detectors have been in RVs ? Not too many I don't think.

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Old 12-06-2014, 07:51 AM   #33
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You can smell propane before it reaches a explosive concentration, so you don't really need a propane detector most of the time. A propane detector is valuable when you are sleeping. Smells don't wake you up.
That said, as far as I know, propane/natural gas detectors are not required in homes and motels by codes as are smoke detectors.
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Old 12-06-2014, 04:34 PM   #34
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Depending upon the odor is a dangerous proposition. It is added at the point of distribution, as propane itself is odorless. The additive is called mercaptin. There are documented cases of propane being sold where the mercaptin wasn't added. Not worth the risk to me. I'd never be without one.
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Old 12-06-2014, 05:05 PM   #35
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A problem that can occur with propane is the loss of odor. There are cases in which the odor has been thought to be diminished or plainly the people smelling the propane no longer smelt it, when in fact the persons ability to smell it has just been diminished. Thusly, the person thought there was no longer a leak when in fact there was and they just could not smell it anymore because their sense of smell was accustomed to the odor. This generally happens at higher concentrations or prolonged exposure. After removing yourself from the affected atmosphere for a while your senses go back to normal.
There have also been cases where the odor has been diminished thru bleeding out thru piping that has been contaminated with water or while passing thru soil.



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Old 02-17-2015, 08:34 PM   #36
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I just bought a used motorhome and I am going over everything in it.

I did a search for testing CO detectors. While I was reading this thread it occurred to me: it is battery operated device, take it off the wall, go outside and hold it near the exhaust pipe of a running vehicle, dummy.

I do like that "10 year" model with the digital readout..
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Old 02-18-2015, 12:36 PM   #37
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Don't do that !!!! You'll kill the internal sensor and render the device useless.


Carbon Monoxide Alarm & Detector FAQs | FirstAlertStore.com


Read the section titled "Can I test my carbon monoxide alarm in any other way besides pressing the test button?"
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