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Old 09-25-2019, 06:52 AM   #1
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Floor Repair From Water Damage

I didn't see a specific category for interior repair. I have a 2011 V-Lite that received some leaking around the toilet and subsequent softening of the floor. The floor appears to be a thin layer of plywood, a layer of foam insulation and another layer of plywood all covered by linoleum. How does one go about repairing this flooring? It is only around the toilet. I can cut the vinyl flooring back. Can I just replace that top layer of plywood? My guess is that it is glued to the styrofoam. I figured that I would have to replace the linoleum because it won't adhere down tight against the wall after it is cut.
Has anyone repaired a section of flooring. We really like the floor plan and the rest of the trailer is still rock solid. I was going to look on YouTube also for suggestions, so if anyone knows of a link that would be great.
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Old 09-25-2019, 07:46 AM   #2
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Type the following in your search box. "RV floor repair you tube". You will find lots of videos.
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Old 09-25-2019, 08:03 AM   #3
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Thanks. I was hoping that someone had some tips or trick experience and would say, "This video is the best" or something like that. Or, use this material because it is easy to work with.
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Old 09-25-2019, 08:24 AM   #4
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If the floor is soft, but still intact, then use Abatron Liquid epoxy to harden and strengthen the wood floor. Goes on as a liquid, penetrates and becomes rock solid. If you need to fill in some gaps, then the wood resin epoxy will replace missing pieces that have some foundation to build upon.
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Old 09-25-2019, 09:08 AM   #5
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Thanks. I didn't even know this stuff existed. I do believe I will have to tear it out unless I can get the moisture out. I suppose I can lift up the linoleum and direct some fans under it to dry the wood out. If I can do that, then this epoxy will make it easy.
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Old 09-25-2019, 09:36 AM   #6
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Quote:
I do believe I will have to tear it out unless I can get the moisture out. I suppose I can lift up the linoleum and direct some fans under it to dry the wood out.
Yes do that... even turn on the AC unit to keep the inside air dryer then the outside air. I would consider even tearing out all the floor covering, then just replace it all using the old as a pattern, or replacing with tile squares.
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Old 09-25-2019, 09:54 AM   #7
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Replacing with something else was my original plan but this wood epoxy intrigues me. The only thing that gives me pause is cutting the vinyl flooring then trying to re-lay it down. My guess is that it is adhered to the wood below plus it goes under the cabinets, walls and shower. Not sure how it would look. I don't want it to look like a hack did the job. I may enlist help from a friend that installs flooring for a living.
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Old 09-25-2019, 11:16 AM   #8
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FYI on the Wood Epoxy...

I used it 2 years ago on some outside wood that had rotted and paint flaked off. After digging out the loose rotted wood parts, I mixed the liquids and applied it. It is thin and watery and soaked into the wood. After 6-8 hours it was hard. Any needed wood filing where the rot was, was then accomplished with the 2 part wood filler. I first applied the a thin coat of the liquid, then immediately used the wood filler to build-up low areas. The two are compatible and the liquid helped the filler adhere on vertical surfaces. After 24 hours I sanded or used a surform rasp to level. Then I painted. After 2 summers in the sun and snow I checked it recently and all is still solid. I had some extensive rot near my roof line on some ornamental 8x10 wood rafter ends that supports my roof... so it got into bad shape by not watching it from a ladder for about the last 10 years. It is now good again.

You may still need to reinforce from the bottom depending on the load on the floor at the damage area.

The liquid and the filler products are available as a kit as I showed or separately. Only place I could find it was amazon. I followed the recommendation of a local radio talk show host that does a home repair show everry Saturday morning on the AM radio.
https://garysullivan.iheart.com/

Hope all comes out good in the end for you...
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Old 09-26-2019, 08:00 AM   #9
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I just repaired a 2' x 4' section of my floor. In my case my floor was 5/8" plywood on 2"x3" floor trusses. I did not have the styrofoam insulation in the floor just standard bats of fiberglass insulation. I reinforced the area with additional 2x3's and also used some of the clear penetrating epoxy sealer on some of the wood that remained. I would say for the most part having some basic carpentry skills is all you need. I am by no means a professional carpenter. Also in my case, the vinyl flooring was not glued down at all. I was able to cut it very carefully and remove it. When I replaced it I used special double sided tape around the perimeter to hold it in place. 3 sides where I removed the vinyl had the outside wall on one side, the stairs up to the bedroom on another, and the kitchen cabinet island on the third. Once I put the vinyl floor piece back in I used a strip of quarter round shoe moulding around those 3 sides. The 4th seam is the only one I had visible and I bought a transition strip from HD to cover the seam. When I cut out the vinyl, I cut it much bigger than the section of floor that I replaced so I could easily put it back in and cover the perimeter seams with moulding.
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Old 09-26-2019, 08:14 AM   #10
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Sounds very similar to what I will be doing. I am glad it worked out for you. I bet it looks great and is rock solid again.
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Old 09-26-2019, 08:27 AM   #11
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In my experience if you have some very basic skills these coaches are pretty simple to work on. Over the years I have done a lot of repairs and updates. I just helped a buddy of mine replace his entire roof membrane and some of the roof plywood. He has very limited carpentry skills (actually had to buy some cordless drills and such) and he did 75% of it by himself. He called with a few basic question but his response was "it was a lot easier than I thought, it was just time consuming"
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Old 09-26-2019, 09:23 AM   #12
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I can agree with that. Sometimes the thought of doing a project is worse than actually doing the project. I just want it to look good upon completion. This forum is a good source of info. I would have never known about the wood epoxy if it weren't from here. Thanks to all who contributed.
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Old 09-27-2019, 08:44 AM   #13
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Here is some pics from before during and after. Near the bottom you can see the transition strip I used when putting the vinyl back. Attachment 215887Attachment 215888Attachment 215889Click image for larger version

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Old 09-27-2019, 09:23 AM   #14
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That looks very nice. I will do something very similar. The one transition strip will be right under the bathroom door so that might hide it some. I really like the looks. Thanks for the pictures.
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Old 09-27-2019, 10:08 AM   #15
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One thing to be aware of. You can see some "ripples" in the vinyl flooring after I relaid it. I did not glue it down in case I ever needed to lift it again. It's not super noticible but I see it. I'm hoping after a while it will relax some. Depending on your situation maybe some additional vinyl flooring double stick tape would be in order in the field.
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Old 09-27-2019, 10:37 AM   #16
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Good idea. I hope I never have to lift it again though.
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