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Old 01-21-2009, 08:47 PM   #11
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Sixty tops to be safe. Drove 3000 miles last year in 2 weeks and never went over 60 interstate or not. I feel much safer and am sure those around me do as well. What's the rush? You'll only be getting to your funeral that much faster. Best fuel mileage can be had below 60 as well. This 65 tire rating is the max. Why does everyone think they have to go that speed. Just because your tachometer redlines at 7000rpm does not mean you run your engine at 7000 every chance you get......................................
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Old 01-21-2009, 10:11 PM   #12
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Tire and valve stem pressures

I apologize for any confusion about valve stems, so let me try to clear this up. I am an ASE certified Master Technician, and I have seen many tires mounted with wrong valve stems. It seems that after you learn to sweep the shop, your next job is to mount tires. The dividing line between low and high pressure is around 50 psi, then again at 90~10 psi. Regular valve stems are all rubber, but may have a metal sleeve over them for decoration. High pressure stems will have an all metal barrel, usually brass colored, with the only rubber being down near the wheel. Very high pressure stems will have a nut and washer, and a sealing washer down near the base of the valve stem. Rockwood06, if you have changed tires on your truck, and they gave you new valve stems, I would be concerned.

One last bit of info. Check tire with the proper gauge. Tire gauges are routinely only accurate in the center of their range. A 100 psi gauge will read 50 psi to within 1%. BUT at the edges, it get sloppy. AT 90 psi, the same gauge is only 10% accurate. SO, if your car tires need 30 psi, use a gauge that has a maximum of 50~60. If your trailer tires need 50 psi, you need a 100 psi gauge, and for 80 psi tires, you need a 150 psi gauge. And this is why mechanics go broke buying tools trying to do the job right.

Just remember, mounting tires is like installing WD hitches, there's no test to pass, and as long as it holds air till you get off the lot, who cares?

Sorry to be so long, but your tires are all you have between you and the road, and tires cause more problems than many realize.

Windrider
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Old 01-21-2009, 11:15 PM   #13
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Once again, thanks for the good info. I know it will go a long way.
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Old 01-21-2009, 11:31 PM   #14
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Would it be safe to say that when mounting new tires, no matter what the rating, to use high pressure valve stems?
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Old 01-22-2009, 05:56 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by windrider View Post
I apologize for any confusion about valve stems, so let me try to clear this up. I am an ASE certified Master Technician, and I have seen many tires mounted with wrong valve stems. It seems that after you learn to sweep the shop, your next job is to mount tires. The dividing line between low and high pressure is around 50 psi, then again at 90~10 psi. Regular valve stems are all rubber, but may have a metal sleeve over them for decoration. High pressure stems will have an all metal barrel, usually brass colored, with the only rubber being down near the wheel. Very high pressure stems will have a nut and washer, and a sealing washer down near the base of the valve stem. Rockwood06, if you have changed tires on your truck, and they gave you new valve stems, I would be concerned.

One last bit of info. Check tire with the proper gauge. Tire gauges are routinely only accurate in the center of their range. A 100 psi gauge will read 50 psi to within 1%. BUT at the edges, it get sloppy. AT 90 psi, the same gauge is only 10% accurate. SO, if your car tires need 30 psi, use a gauge that has a maximum of 50~60. If your trailer tires need 50 psi, you need a 100 psi gauge, and for 80 psi tires, you need a 150 psi gauge. And this is why mechanics go broke buying tools trying to do the job right.

Just remember, mounting tires is like installing WD hitches, there's no test to pass, and as long as it holds air till you get off the lot, who cares?

Sorry to be so long, but your tires are all you have between you and the road, and tires cause more problems than many realize.

Windrider

Excellent information, thanks a lot. There is a price to pay for not taking the time to investigate. As far as the tires that were changed out on the Suburban, I have been dealing with the same people for almost 30 years and when the tires were changed out the high pressure valve stems were ordered, so I am confident with my Mechanic. The valve stems on the Trial Blazer are those type that you mentioned, they are short and look like there is a nut and washer at the face of the rim, but why would this type of set up be on a Trail Blazer, It's a 2007? because the max pressure rating on the tires are 32 psi. this makes it a low pressure tire if 50 psi is the cut off.
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Old 01-22-2009, 09:33 AM   #16
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Rockwood06, Can't explain the valve stems on the Blazer from memory, but it probably has something to do with the design of the wheel. If you have fancy aluminum wheels, they have to be thicker than steel, and that thickness may not let a conventional valve stem work. The thickness may require a clamp-in type valve stem. Amost the same thing with wheel weights. In the old days, when you balanced a tire you put on wheel weights, one size fits all. Today there are over 5 styles of wheel weights in use, not counting some very specific weights designed for one wheel only, which nobody carries, not even the dealer, hence, stick on weights to the rescue. I would suggest on the Blazer when it'e time for tires, you check a couple of days in advance, and ask about replacing those valve stems. Give the shop a chance to find the correct ones.

Another warning. Don't let age of a shop fool you into thinking they they know what they're doing. I went into a shop, and was making a guy remount a set a tires because of the wrong pressure valve stems. The owner for 15 years had a fit, never heard of search a thing. Called the parts house and ordered all three kind in a package with specs printed on it, (very expensive way to buy), in order to prove my point. There is a "sticky" note posted about tires and valve stems for futher reading if you desire. Thanks for letting me have the soapbox once again.

Windrider

To Bill U, yes, for the most part it would be safe to mount use high pressure valve stems when mounting tire. They will leak a litle under low pressure, so check pressure more regularly, say, twice a month instead of once. Also don't forget to check them during time of temperature change. Ten degrees of air temp equals one pound of pressure, as a rule of thumb.
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Old 01-22-2009, 01:34 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windrider View Post
Rockwood06, Can't explain the valve stems on the Blazer from memory, but it probably has something to do with the design of the wheel. If you have fancy aluminum wheels, they have to be thicker than steel, and that thickness may not let a conventional valve stem work. The thickness may require a clamp-in type valve stem. Amost the same thing with wheel weights. In the old days, when you balanced a tire you put on wheel weights, one size fits all. Today there are over 5 styles of wheel weights in use, not counting some very specific weights designed for one wheel only, which nobody carries, not even the dealer, hence, stick on weights to the rescue. I would suggest on the Blazer when it'e time for tires, you check a couple of days in advance, and ask about replacing those valve stems. Give the shop a chance to find the correct ones.

Another warning. Don't let age of a shop fool you into thinking they they know what they're doing. I went into a shop, and was making a guy remount a set a tires because of the wrong pressure valve stems. The owner for 15 years had a fit, never heard of search a thing. Called the parts house and ordered all three kind in a package with specs printed on it, (very expensive way to buy), in order to prove my point. There is a "sticky" note posted about tires and valve stems for futher reading if you desire. Thanks for letting me have the soapbox once again.

Windrider

To Bill U, yes, for the most part it would be safe to mount use high pressure valve stems when mounting tire. They will leak a litle under low pressure, so check pressure more regularly, say, twice a month instead of once. Also don't forget to check them during time of temperature change. Ten degrees of air temp equals one pound of pressure, as a rule of thumb.




Now you have brought up another issue I have to consider, Not too long ago I posted an issue I had with the receiver that came with my new truck, It is under "What's the differents between Receivers" It was recomended to change the tires out from a 4 ply tire to a 10 ply tire by the dealer, now I will have to see if the aluminum wheels that came with the truck are rated for an 80 psi tire and that means that the valve stems would have to be changed. Here I go back to to the dealer again. The info that you have supplied has open my eyes even more.
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Old 04-12-2009, 12:14 PM   #18
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With properly inflated tires in good shape on both the truck and trailer you should be able to maintain highway posted limits. Remember that you may have to stop quickly in an emergency due to some fool cutting you off or pulling some bonehead maneuver in front of you. Once your trailer decides to go out of control "jackknifing" you may not be able to correct quick enough. Drive at your own comfort levels. It's better to get to the campground than a tow yard.
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