Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-17-2015, 06:40 PM   #11
2011 Berkshire 390BH-60
 
TaterColo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: SW Denver Colo
Posts: 310
If I store mine for a week or month I always turn my main battery disconnect off in the bay. My coach is 4 years old and I've never had replaced the batteries yet.


Sent from my iPhone using Forest River Forums
__________________

__________________
TaterColo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2015, 07:12 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
CAT-RN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 6,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by TaterColo View Post
If I store mine for a week or month I always turn my main battery disconnect off in the bay. My coach is 4 years old and I've never had replaced the batteries yet.


Sent from my iPhone using Forest River Forums

But then your refrigerator is off too. Right?

Russell
__________________

__________________
CAT-RN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2015, 08:37 PM   #13
2011 Berkshire 390BH-60
 
TaterColo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: SW Denver Colo
Posts: 310
Yes. I don't need it on in the storage unit. When I pick it up I get the fridge going on gas. By the time I get home it had started to cool.


Sent from my iPhone using Forest River Forums
__________________
TaterColo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2015, 08:39 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
CAT-RN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 6,147
Ok. I keep my plugged in full time. I also have residential frig.

Russell
__________________
CAT-RN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2015, 08:55 PM   #15
2011 Berkshire 390BH-60
 
TaterColo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: SW Denver Colo
Posts: 310
That's why I like the multi usage fridge. Yes it's not as big but it runs off battery/shore power/ gas. And I don't have as many batteries to worry about.

But yes it's not as big. 😊


Sent from my iPhone using Forest River Forums
__________________
TaterColo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2015, 09:10 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
CAT-RN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 6,147
When traveling daily the gas frig the best. If setting all winter someplace the residential probably better. Either one big enough.

Russell
__________________
CAT-RN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2015, 10:18 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
tmmar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Long Island (Nassau County), NY
Posts: 4,258
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAT-RN View Post
Either one big enough.

Russell
Not if you have one of your sons, their wife and either 2 or 4 grand children with you. That is why we went to the '14 with the residential refrigerator because it is bigger and gives the ability to carry more food. Just need to get to the refrigerator before the grand kids do!! (LOL!!)
__________________
Tom and Margaret
2014 Berkshire 390bh-60

tmmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2015, 10:34 AM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 63
OK, we're making progress, but I still have questions and maybe it will take a volt meter to get true answer.

Yes, I was only planning on using the "salesman switch" disconnect by the front door. The old Westinghouse TV seems to have a mind of its own and turn on via power fluctuations, so I want to turn off the coach--we have the fridge emptied, new baking soda installed and turned off.

I want to charge/keep topped-off both the coach (6V) and chassis (12V) batteries.

1. Will the chassis batteries get charged by the main charging system? Or do they only get charged via the alternator. I seem to recall reading or being told that once the coach batteries are charged, the system will redirect power to the chassis batteries. Is that true?

2. Based on what you've said so far, the salesman switch may turn off the power to the coach, but leave the batteries connected to the charger...I like that idea...any other comments/confirmation on that statement would be appreciated.

3. If I get out the trusty volt meter while it's plugged in, I should see ~13.6v on the batteries right?

One last idea...I could hear the fan on my charger the other day (and I have not disconnected the batteries via the salesman switch); I suppose if I flip the switch and the fan turns off, that would be a pretty good indicator that no charging was occurring...thoughts?

Thanks as always for the great discussion...it is much appreciated!
__________________
smo99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2015, 01:33 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 505
Physically disconnect the batteries for long term storage. There are several small loads that will discharge them otherwise.
__________________
Harkerr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2015, 02:05 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 104
I'll weigh in here... I have a 2015 Charleston, which should be very similar to your Berkshire...

First off, the 120V AC system and the house batteries are two completely different systems. If you are plugged in to Shore Power, you will have 120 VAC available at all your outlets - regardless of the status of your battery cutoff switches (in the battery compartment) or the Salesman's switch (by the front door).

The only "connection" between the batteries and the 120 VAC systems is your inverter. When you are not plugged in to Shore Power, you can turn on the inverter to get 120 VAC at the outlets. My coach will run pretty much all day on batteries (when not running A/C), then I charge them for a couple of hours with the generator.

I too have a residential refrigerator, and I run it 24/7/365. Not necessary, but easier... If you shut off the refrigerator, be sure to prop the doors open so the inside can dry. I don't know where you all live, but out here, I can get mold growing in a day or two if the fridge is wet and closed.

The Salesman's Switch will turn off most, but not all of the 12V systems in the coach. When I turn mine off, everything 12V behind the front seats turns off. It does not turn off the 12V outlets on the dash. I believe those outlets are powered by the chassis batteries.

I do believe the cutoff switches in the battery bay turn off all connections to the batteries - including charging. The reason for this would be that those batteries store a tremendous amount of power - if there was an electrical failure, the batteries could cause a fire, and/or explode. The cutoff switches completely disconnect the batteries. When I store my coach, I plug in the shore power cable, and leave the battery bay disconnects "ON". If I have to leave the coach disconnected for any length of time (not connected to shore power), I turn the battery compartment cutoff's "OFF".

When the coach is unused and not connected to power, there are parasitic drains on the batteries. The radio memory, system controllers, GPS, among others, all cause power drain. If you're not using the coach and it's unpowered, these systems are unnecessary, and only run down the batteries. Using the battery compartment cutoff will eliminate these current draws, and will keep the batteries at their full charge...

Just a side note - if you use the battery compartment cutoffs, all of your radio settings will most likely be lost. Not a huge deal, but something to notice...

Another use for the battery cutoffs: Occasionally, my GPS/radio locks up and so does my thermostat. If things ever get "weird" (not functioning as they should), I pull my shore power cord, and cut off the batteries for 5 minutes. This causes all power to the coach to be lost. When power is restored, many times the weirdness will resolve. Just like rebooting your computer...

The coach will charge both the chassis and coach batteries when plugged into shore power (and the battery bay disconnects are ON). The easiest way I can think of to verify this is to get a Digital Multi Meter (DMM). Measure and record the voltage across the batteries with the battery compartment cutoff OFF, and the shore power disconnected. Now plug in the shore power and wait several minutes. Make the same voltage measurement. If the batteries are charging, the voltage will be slightly higher than the previous recorded voltage. If the voltage is the same, your batteries are not charging. Next, turn the disconnects to ON and wait a few minutes. Even with current draws from the coach, the battery voltage should still be slightly higher. If the voltage never rises, it would appear that there's a problem with your charging system.

One last note, use the voltmeter to verify charging - the charger fans may be thermally controlled. No fans may not equate to no charging...

13.6 V sounds like a good voltage level when charging...

Good luck!
Carl
__________________

__________________
ckabrahamson is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
battery, battery disconnect, storage

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:26 AM.