Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-06-2013, 11:33 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
kingwood390bh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 270
Mountain driving and engine temperature

I had my first experience driving in the mountains of California and Colorado this month. Climbing Big Bear, I climbed a steep grade and watched my temp gauge go from 1/4 to over 3/4 in seconds. I thought I would have some time to ease up but that was not the case. I had to pull off several times to keep from over heating. I pulled out the books and geared down to make it up the mountain. Then, every other climb I was paranoid and glued my eyes to the temp guage. I scraped up a couple of doors on a guard rail trying to negotiate switchbacks on descent, but thats another story. Any other diesel owners have some magic answer to mountain climbs?
__________________

__________________
kingwood390bh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 12:10 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
NV245's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Carmel, In
Posts: 175
Did it really overheat? In my 2008 360QS I wanted to know how fast I could pull my 2009 Grand Cherokee if needed. I was on a straight stretch of highway and put the pedal down. About 75 mph the temp gauge started to climb from it's normal 5/8 position. I figured this was OK as that was a sufficient speed, considering vehicle. Months later, traveling to Gettysburg, Pa. I encountered hills that required flat accelerator. Watching the temp gauge, it started to climb, and as I began to worry about the temp getting too high, I heard the cooling fan come up to speed, and the temp gauge maintained a 3/4 gauge status. Never overheated. the fan maintained the temp. Now I want to check the hub bolts, from other threads in this forum, however I know that if a Cummins engine detects overheat, it will shutdown power to prevent damage.
__________________

__________________
NV245 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 01:25 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Grizzlygibbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 326
I would be looking to do some preventative maintenance on your cooling system. Your antifreeze/water mixture may be too rich.

I am not well versed with diesels but I do know that some vehicles have a "serviceable" fan clutch in which a heavier weight silicone oil can be replaced with possibly worn out older lighter weight oil. Changing to a heavier weight oil allows the fan clutch to engage earlier and stay engaged longer when temperature rise which could help keep your engine cooler.

Another option may be to install a pusher fan.
__________________
2008 Toyota Tundra Crewmax Limited w/tow mirrors, 5.7L, 4.30 gears, six speed tranny, towing package, Firestone Ride Rite airbags.

2014 Rockwood Roo 233s, PI HW30-C, Equalizer 10k 4 way hitch,
Grizzlygibbs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 06:23 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 74
Yea, I'd be checking the clutch fan first. My trail blazer had to have a new one at 50k miles. I was guessing the previous owner must have done a lot of idling.
__________________
Frankm2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 11:54 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Home is where I park it
Posts: 1,503
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingwood390bh View Post
I had my first experience driving in the mountains of California and Colorado this month. Climbing Big Bear, I climbed a steep grade and watched my temp gauge go from 1/4 to over 3/4 in seconds. I thought I would have some time to ease up but that was not the case. I had to pull off several times to keep from over heating. I pulled out the books and geared down to make it up the mountain. Then, every other climb I was paranoid and glued my eyes to the temp guage. I scraped up a couple of doors on a guard rail trying to negotiate switchbacks on descent, but thats another story. Any other diesel owners have some magic answer to mountain climbs?
Being a Western guy, I've been all over the mountains and have yet to come even close to overheating. How fast do you try to go up? If you're standing on the hammer, that could be an issue.

I usually don't try to crowd the accelerator; just let it take a bit more time to go up. If you're trying to go up as fast as you run on the level, that probably ain't gonna work.

As an aside, except for an extremely short (1000 feet or so) 13 percent "hill" in Utah, the steepest grades in the whole country(at least that I've been on) are around State College, PA. In driving the whole USA in a semi, those are the only ones on which I had to shift all the way down to 5th gear (from 10th)

And yes, I said 13%!!! Had to drop the toad to get over; My old Dutch Star gasser just came to a full stop with the hammer on the floor!

Boowho??
__________________
boowho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 12:55 PM   #6
2013 Berkshire 390 BH-60
 
Jersey Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 97
I did some driving in the hills of western Virginia on I81 and western N. Carolina on I77 at the beginning of July. Temp rose to about 215 and cooled back down to about 200 rather quickly. All was well.
__________________
Mike
2013 Berkshire 390BH-60
Jersey Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 01:14 PM   #7
daydreaming about camping
 
jeeplj8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: KC area
Posts: 1,400
unless you have actual gauges, you have no idea what your real coolant temp was. The idiot gauges on the dash are designed to only read normal and time to go the dealer.

For less than 20 bucks you pick up a bluetooth dongle that will read your factory inputs on your smart phone, tablet etc and you will know the real numbers. Then you can make educated choices about how hot is too hot.

For example, on our trip to Colorado last year, towing Monarch pass with my trailer (around 9200lbs) my truck frequently hit 220 coolant temp. the aux fan would kick in and drop it to 216, then cut off. Those temps are nothing to worry about. I never got over 225 in 104 degree heat on I-70 coming back across Kansas either. I also pay attention to my engine oil temp, and transmission temp too.
__________________

2013 Coachmen Freedom Express 320BHDS pulled by a 2005 F250 King Ranch CC

A rainy day camping is better than a sunny day at work.
jeeplj8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 01:39 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Grizzlygibbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 326
Not all vehicles are alike. Some, by the time the "idiot" light goes off, means Holy $&*!, I better pull over with the amount of steam spraying my windshield. I mean, too hot of temperatures can do thousands of dollars worth of damage to a vehicles engine and drivetrain.

The fact is, if the light or gauge is reading anything but normal, something is not right.

I do agree that its a good idea to monitor these temps closer and more accurately and you gave a good tip on the bluetooth temp sensors, however, some preventative maintenance goes a long way and gives a better piece of mind knowing it was done rather than hoping you can get through with just monitoring.
__________________
2008 Toyota Tundra Crewmax Limited w/tow mirrors, 5.7L, 4.30 gears, six speed tranny, towing package, Firestone Ride Rite airbags.

2014 Rockwood Roo 233s, PI HW30-C, Equalizer 10k 4 way hitch,
Grizzlygibbs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 02:27 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
PineForestCamper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingwood390bh View Post
I scraped up a couple of doors on a guard rail trying to negotiate switchbacks on descent, but thats another story.
I am interested in that other story. Scrapes on doors from a guard rail does not sound good. Burning up an engine is one thing but going thru a guard rail and off the mtn is another. I travel thru mountains in Montana / Wyoming every year and have found myself on long descents (12-20 miles / 10% grades) and have found that going really slow is the answer. My experience is the best way to keep it slow is to put it in low gear and let the transmission take you down safely and slowly and that does mean slow. A rather large line of people who are in a hurry may develop behind you but that is not your concern. You cant burn thru your brakes if you never use them. If you are driving slow enough you will not put much of a burden on your brakes. Most importantly you wont have any danger of going over the edge if your speed remains slow as your brakes will always be able to get you stopped at lower speeds. Not sure how much if any of this applies to your scrapes. If none at all I apologize for babbling. Mountain driving is probably my favorite thing to do. Traversing all of those switchbacks is exhilirating! Here is a picture of one of my favorite trips (Chief Joseph Highway). Good luck to you.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN2004.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	52.8 KB
ID:	37168  
__________________
2009 Chevy Silverado/2500/6.0/3.73/CC
2016 Keystone Outback 250URS
2013 Rockwood Roo 233s (SOLD)

http://instagram.com/pineforestcamper#
----------------------------------------
PineForestCamper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2013, 02:31 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
ernest917's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Woodville, Texas
Posts: 1,713
Just returned from a month in the mountains of WY, MT UT and CO and didn't have a single overheating issue with my Mercedes engine in my Berk..... Always geared down going up and down in addition to using the engine brake coming down.... What ever gear I used going up I used one gear lower going down.... This was on numerous 6, 8 and even 10% grades.....
__________________

__________________
ernest917 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
mount

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:04 AM.