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Old 10-14-2018, 10:26 AM   #1
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On board air use on a 2017 Berkshire 43a.

I noticed a air supply connection in my generator compartment. I was wondering if anyone has used this for an air supply to air up toad tires, Coach tires or for general use.
And what the limitations are if it can be used for those purposes at all?
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Old 10-14-2018, 10:32 AM   #2
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Yep, just need the engine running and use a long air hose....
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Old 10-14-2018, 10:33 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Welshes View Post
Yep, just need the engine running and use a long air hose....
Cool. Thanks.
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Old 10-14-2018, 11:40 AM   #4
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The external air outlet is simply an extension of your onboard air tank(s) for your air brakes and air bags, and can easily handle anything any other air pump/tank would provide, whether tires or toys or just to blowing out debris from your storage bays, etc...

very useful...

but, actually, NO, you don't 'need' your engine running, since there is already built up air pressure in your tank(s)... but, yes, if you use too much, and the pressure starts to fall too much, you'll have to replenish the tanks by cranking the engine.
Some folks think that losing air pressure is a 'bad' thing, as it somehow might compromise your air brakes, but NAY, that's actually the OPPOSITE of what happens.
As a CDL driver, one of the basics of any Commercial license is learning how our air brakes and the air compressors and tanks work.
The air pressure is actually what allows you to RELEASE the brakes. Without air pressure, the springs within the wheel brakes actually KEEP the coach from moving! Crazy,,,, but true : )


travel, enjoy : )
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Old 10-14-2018, 11:42 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by formerFR View Post
The external air outlet is simply an extension of your onboard air tank(s) for your air brakes and air bags, and can easily handle anything any other air pump/tank would provide, whether tires or toys or just to blowing out debris from your storage bays, etc...

very useful...
Good to know. Thanks
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Old 10-14-2018, 01:37 PM   #6
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Yes, you can inflate ALL the beach toys with it. Or run power tools.

And yes, you can inflate your coach tires with it. The only problem is, that you are pumping your tires up to 100+ psi and the air system bleeds down beyond that before it pumps up again. So, there is little differential and you'll have a hard time getting those last PSI in there.

So, there are people that have installed a valve first into the connector so they can bleed air into the atmosphere and force the air down to where the pump comes on, and then have the air chuck on the tire thus bringing the tire in the loop all the way up....

This does require you to have the engine running.
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Old 10-14-2018, 02:06 PM   #7
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I use mine all the time for airing up the coach tires. I made a special chuck for this purpose. Bought a tee, pressure gauge, quick release and a tire chuck. Quick connect on one end of the tee, chuck on the other and the pressure gauge on the top of the tee. This way I can see while filling what pressure is in the line because the air system won’t start the compressor unit 75 lbs is hit. Sucks then your trying to put 100 lbs of air into the tire. This way once the pressure starts to drop below my target pressure for the tire I can bleed the air tank down from the chuck to start the compressor to get back up to 125 #s so I can continue with airing up the tire
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Old 10-14-2018, 02:44 PM   #8
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This is great information guys thanks
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Old 10-14-2018, 09:37 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by formerFR View Post
[snip]
Some folks think that losing air pressure is a 'bad' thing, as it somehow might compromise your air brakes, but NAY, that's actually the OPPOSITE of what happens.
As a CDL driver, one of the basics of any Commercial license is learning how our air brakes and the air compressors and tanks work.
The air pressure is actually what allows you to RELEASE the brakes. Without air pressure, the springs within the wheel brakes actually KEEP the coach from moving! Crazy,,,, but true : )


travel, enjoy : )
Actually, you are simplifying the air brake system too much.

The rear brakes are System 1 and have two air cylinders and a heavy park brake spring. One of the cylinders pushes against the park brake spring so that the wheels can turn. If there is a loss of pressure in the air tanks, this cylinder loses pressure and the park brake comes on to stop the coach. This is a fail-safe system, since failure applies the brakes. When you pull the park brake button, you are dumping air from this cylinder so that the park brake spring applies immediately.

The other air cylinder in the rear brakes works like the single cylinder in the from brakes (System 2). When there is air in that cylinder, the brakes are applied. So, the driver uses the brake pedal to control the air in these cylinders to slow the coach as desired. If the brake pedal is released, these cylinders are released and they provide no braking effort.

To put it another way, if there is insufficient air pressure in the whole air system, the rear parking brake will come on, but the driver will lose the ability to apply controlled braking effort to the front and rear brakes.

--cheers, Gordon
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Old 10-15-2018, 04:25 PM   #10
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Air Brake Manuals

In order to be licensed for air brakes, Canadian provinces require that you take a course and pass a test to get an air brake endorsement on your licence. The manuals for these courses are very similar across the provinces, and they are available free online in some provinces. They contain a lot of useful information, and anyone driving a diesel pusher with air brakes should read through one of them.

Newfoundland:
http://www.servicenl.gov.nl.ca/drive...g/airbrake.pdf

Manitoba:
https://www.mpi.mb.ca/en/PDFs/AirBrakeManual.pdf

Bendix:
http://www.suspensionspecialists.com...dbook_2009.pdf

–Gordon
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