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Old 01-21-2015, 09:42 PM   #1
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Rewiring for more inverter powered outlets

Anyone researched this? I'm about to install a fairly heavy duty solar system and with the bigger PSW inverter I'm adding in, I'd like to get rid of this stupid idea of just powering a few sockets when on inverter.

I recently found that the outlets under the base of the bad are fed by the inverter. Wondering why since electric blankets will not operate on MSW?

Finally, anyone know how the system separates the inverter power from the shore power when using an inverter powered outlet, but connected to shore power.

In other words a single outlet can be energized from the inverter OR shore power. Must be some manner of isolating the two systems from each other.

Boowho??
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Old 01-21-2015, 10:56 PM   #2
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Does your breaker panel look like this?

I think I have learned a lot about how it is wired,

Here is the update as I understand it:

I learned that the Breaker Box is actually 2 in 1 with a main panel on the left and the right side acts as a sub-panel. The sub-panel circuits all work off of the inverter.



Based on discussions on other recent threads, I was surprised that the Inverter powers everything but the Air Conditioners and Fireplace.
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Old 01-21-2015, 11:05 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by dan-nickie View Post
Does your breaker panel look like this?

I think I have learned a lot about how it is wired,

Here is the update as I understand it:

I learned that the Breaker Box is actually 2 in 1 with a main panel on the left and the right side acts as a sub-panel. The sub-panel circuits all work off of the inverter.



Based on discussions on other recent threads, I was surprised that the Inverter powers everything but the Air Conditioners and Fireplace.
Is that the breaker box under the bed? I'm surprised that your inverter powers almost everything. Very limited inverter powered outlets in my 2011 rear bath.

Thanks for the reply.

Boowho??
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Old 01-22-2015, 09:00 AM   #4
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Yes, that is the stock breaker box under the bed. 2014 model 390 RB.
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Old 01-22-2015, 09:22 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by boowho View Post
Finally, anyone know how the system separates the inverter power from the shore power when using an inverter powered outlet, but connected to shore power.

In other words a single outlet can be energized from the inverter OR shore power. Must be some manner of isolating the two systems from each other.
A transfer switch would control whether or not the inverter powers your outlets. It can be a stand-alone or built into the inverter. When you have shore power (or generator power) the transfer switch just passes the current through to the outlets. When that source goes away, the inverter kicks in and powers the outlets.

If your current inverter has the switch built in, you need a new one. If its a standalone, it might have enough capacity to work with your new inverter. Or, when you get the new inverter, go for one with a built in transfer switch.

If your panel is wired like the one in the pictures, you would just need to get the additional circuits you want to run into the sub-panel.

Figure one shows the setup you would probably want. Even if the sub-panel is located in the main panel, it should still be wired like the diagram.
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Old 01-22-2015, 12:04 PM   #6
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A transfer switch would control whether or not the inverter powers your outlets. It can be a stand-alone or built into the inverter. When you have shore power (or generator power) the transfer switch just passes the current through to the outlets. When that source goes away, the inverter kicks in and powers the outlets.

If your current inverter has the switch built in, you need a new one. If its a standalone, it might have enough capacity to work with your new inverter. Or, when you get the new inverter, go for one with a built in transfer switch.

If your panel is wired like the one in the pictures, you would just need to get the additional circuits you want to run into the sub-panel.

Figure one shows the setup you would probably want. Even if the sub-panel is located in the main panel, it should still be wired like the diagram.
Great Info....... I'm learning.

Boowho??
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Old 01-23-2015, 01:03 PM   #7
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It should be noted that dan-nickel has a residential refrigerator and a larger inverter than you boo. As such his panel is very different. My 13 390bh had all the wiring but the panel was different and was not split into a main with sub panel.
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Old 02-16-2015, 08:38 AM   #8
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Of course, a lot depends on what specific model you have and what options are installed. However, on my 335, I am installing a second ProWatt 1000 inverter and a neat automatic transfer switch from Xantrex. I will wire it to the 15 amp breaker that feeds all of my non-GFI outlets and it will automatically drop the inverter and pick up genny or shore power when present. You can put an remote on-off switch on the inverter, but when connected to shore power it won't have a load anyway and will use less than 1 Amp of 12 volt. This is exactly the same sub system that FR uses for residential refrigerators. In my coach, the inverter on/off button is bu the stairs. Here is a link to the transfer switch. DonRowe.com: Xantrex 808-0915 PROwatt SW Transfer Switch
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Old 02-16-2015, 08:49 AM   #9
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Of course, a lot depends on what specific model you have and what options are installed. However, on my 335, I am installing a second ProWatt 1000 inverter and a neat automatic transfer switch from Xantrex. I will wire it to the 15 amp breaker that feeds all of my non-GFI outlets and it will automatically drop the inverter and pick up genny or shore power when present. You can put an remote on-off switch on the inverter, but when connected to shore power it won't have a load anyway and will use less than 1 Amp of 12 volt. This is exactly the same sub system that FR uses for residential refrigerators. In my coach, the inverter on/off button is bu the stairs. Here is a link to the transfer switch. DonRowe.com: Xantrex 808-0915 PROwatt SW Transfer Switch
When I had an invertor I had to add a sub panel then wired that to what I wanted on when the invertor was used. Remember when you use the invertor it needs to stop the 110v from the other source of power. Can't use both together and also get PSW.
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Old 02-16-2015, 09:05 AM   #10
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Transfer Switch

Of course you are completely right and that is exactly what the transfer switch does. It plugs into the inverter, one lead takes the "feed" from the breaker to the circuit and the other lead connects to the down stream outlets. When the switch senses 110 volts coming from the breaker (either shore power or genny) it automatically drops the 110 volts coming from the inverter and connects the feed from the breaker. When the breaker stops feeding 110 volts, it switches back to the inverter. Neat solution...all in a nice tidy box from Xantrex.
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