Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-16-2016, 11:53 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
cwilliamp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 22
Batteries drain with WFCO converter. Normal?

I have a 2012 Wildwood with a WFCO ULTRA III Distribution Center, WF-8900 Series. I have noticed that although everything is turned off in the trailer the batteries would die during storage. I have inserted manual switches with all items I cannot turn off, i.e. radio LCD and propane sensor so the battery die is unexpected.


Today, with everything turned off, I also extracted all the 15A fuses in power converter panel and measured with an amp-meter more than 150mA current draw on the batteries.

I then extracted the 40A fuses associated with the "Reverse Polarity Protection" and noticed a spark. Using the amp-meter here I found that the connectors for the Reverse Polarity Protection are drawing current all the time.

I believe the "Reverse Polarity Protection" is causing my batteries to die.



Is this current draw normal for this type of converter providing “Reverse Polarity Protection”?


Thanks
__________________

__________________
Charlie
2012 F150 & Wildwood T231RKXL
cwilliamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2016, 12:23 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
NMWildcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Southern NM
Posts: 916
Every modern RV has parasitic battery drain. Instead of going to all that trouble with switches and fuses, why don't you install a cutoff switch at the battery, or remove the cables from the battery, when storing your rig?
__________________

__________________
Scott and Liz - Southern NM
2012 Wildcat Sterling 32RL - w/level up (best option ever)
2007 Chevy 2500HD 4dr short bed Duramax w/allison
Reese Fifth Airborne air ride king pin coupler with Sidewinder
NMWildcat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2016, 01:47 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: St. Charles, MO
Posts: 179
Parasitic drain is usually the CO detector and it is not removed from the load. Put a disconnect at the battery.
__________________
Timtation is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2016, 02:38 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Bluepill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Pensacola, FL
Posts: 585
Advice to add a disconnect is good. It is the only way to stop the drain.

Also understand the WFCO converters output lower voltage (13.6 volts) than true battery chargers, so your battery usually only charges to around 80 percent of full capacity.

Any time I need full battery capacity I fully charge with a portable battery charger.
__________________
2015 T12RBST Flagstaff Hardside
2008 Itasca Meridian 37H
Bluepill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2016, 02:01 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluepill View Post
Advice to add a disconnect is good. It is the only way to stop the drain.

Also understand the WFCO converters output lower voltage (13.6 volts) than true battery chargers, so your battery usually only charges to around 80 percent of full capacity.

Any time I need full battery capacity I fully charge with a portable battery charger.
When the WFCO converters are working correctly (and most do, mine did not), they are true 3 stage battery chargers. 14.4V for boost mode, 13.6 is normal mode, and 13.2V for float. These are the same voltages used by PD converters. The normal mode alone will always fully charge a battery in decent condition - it make take a couple of days.

The boost mode (higher voltage) cannot be used safely once a battery is above 90% charge. The battery will begin gassing and boiling the water away.

Once fully charged, the charge voltage needs to be reduced again while maintaining the battery at full charge. 13.1 - 13.2 volts is considered the normal float voltage. A prolonged period of more than 13.2V at full charge causes gassing and water loss.

The knock on WFCO converters is that a too-high percentage of them will never enter boost and/or float mode (mine).

Fred W
2014 Rockwood A122 A-frame
(now with dual 6V GC-2 Interstate batteries and PD 4135 converter)
__________________
pgandw is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2016, 08:56 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
WolfWhistle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Hilliard, Florida
Posts: 2,619
Charging phases are Bulk, Absorb and Float plus equalize and some have battery saver or water saver. My batteries get maximum amps (80 at the start - deminishing) till volts get the 14.7v then Absorb begins where those high volts continue while amps keep dropping. Full is considered 2% (programmable) of total battery amp hour that's also set. 2% of 460Ah is 9.2A. Absorb is simply a timed period ... I use 90 minutes. The finish phase begins. For simplicity here lets say I choose Float... that's 13.2v continuously for several hours until mine goes into battery saver. All this is temperature compensated. Equalize is 15.3v and done with careful monitoring. The key to getting a good full charge is higher voltage. You will not cook or boil a good battery / batteries I can go from 50% to full (really full) in about 3 hours. A good converter can't match this. something else to consider is when you guys are looking for 14.4 (whatever) Bulk / Absorb the batteries have to be discharged far enough or it ain't happening.
WW
__________________
XLR Hyperlite 29HFS
Ram 2500 6.7L CTD
Triumph Thunderbird

A Modder's work is never done!
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2016, 12:37 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 693
Agreed, you can charge faster with temperature compensation. I assume your charger is not in the battery compartment and has a remote temperature detection wire - otherwise the temp compensation is working on false info. And yes, you can use higher voltages for equalization - as you point out 15.3V with careful monitoring.

My point was not that the built-in converter is the fastest charger, but if working correctly, it will recharge your batteries to 100%, and will float them indefinitely. In other words, the stock WFCO converter (assumes working to spec), if left plugged in, will take care of your batteries without any monitoring or over-volting of the other DC components.

In my particular case (and I suspect many others), I don't need the fastest possible recharge, so I "make do" with a PD 4135 converter/distribution panel. I don't carry a generator or solar panels. When the batteries (dual 6V 232 AH Interstate) are down to 50% (4 nights or longer), my water tank is running low, fridge is low on food, and it's time to move the A-frame to a new location. My batteries get fully recharged (if the tow vehicle didn't do it on the way home) at home with the camper plugged in inside the garage.

I also installed a marine cut-off switch on the battery box (A-frames and PUPs don't come with any disconnect), so I can both disconnect ALL loads and isolate the batteries for trouble-shooting or electrical work.

Fred W
2014 Rockwood A122 A-frame
2008 Hyundai Entourage minivan
camping Colorado and adjacent states one weekend at a time
last trip: Black Hills, Custer State Park
next trip: Utah 5 national parks
__________________
pgandw is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2016, 02:31 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mountain Foothills of Southern Alberta
Posts: 543
Boy has this thread gotten off track. The OP didn't ask about charging batteries.

The converter itself would not be draining the battery, the DC power from the battery goes through those 40A fuses before it goes to the trailer wiring. You have a parasitic draw from something like the CO detector etc. As mention earlier disconnect the battery cable or install a disconnect switch to remedy the problem.
__________________

2007 Surveyor SV230
- 200 Watts Solar/MPPT Controller - 230 AH Battery Bank - 600 watt PSW Inverter - (2) 2000 watt Inverter Generators - LED Lighting - Boon Docking 99% of the time.
2009 F150 - 5.4 Litre - 6 speed - Tow Package
boondocking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2016, 05:12 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
WolfWhistle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Hilliard, Florida
Posts: 2,619
my point and true I went ad nauseum towards an off track post is that the main reason IMO that chasing a .2 to .3 amp drain when the cause could be something such as a bad or poorly charged battery. There is in fact a small load (DC) in the converter / WFCO panel with fuses removed. There is monitoring circuitry there. The spark noticed could have been a capacitor " surge " as it filled. With an ammeter find out how much the load is on the WFCO and converter; if its .2 - .3 amps that's not your problem.
WW
__________________
XLR Hyperlite 29HFS
Ram 2500 6.7L CTD
Triumph Thunderbird

A Modder's work is never done!
WolfWhistle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2016, 05:35 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Mountain Foothills of Southern Alberta
Posts: 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by WolfWhistle View Post
....that chasing a .2 to .3 amp drain when the cause could be something such as a bad or poorly charged battery.
Never heard of a low battery causing a .2 to.3 amp constant draw.
__________________

__________________

2007 Surveyor SV230
- 200 Watts Solar/MPPT Controller - 230 AH Battery Bank - 600 watt PSW Inverter - (2) 2000 watt Inverter Generators - LED Lighting - Boon Docking 99% of the time.
2009 F150 - 5.4 Litre - 6 speed - Tow Package
boondocking is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
converter, drain, wfco

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:57 PM.