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Old 07-25-2019, 03:44 PM   #1
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Need Replacement Dometic Thermostat

I need to replace my Dometic Model 3313196.000 Thermostat. I searched on the internet and none are available anywhere (RV stores, eBay, Amazon, nowhere). I contacted Dometic and they basically told me this is no longer manufactured and I should take my 2012 Forester to my local dealer to get a replacement installed that will work with my particular model of heat pump. But I would just like to replace it myself at far less cost. Has anyone successfully replaced their Dometic Model 3313196.000 Thermostat with another model or brand and if so could you please provide exact details so I can purchase one myself. Thanks everyone.
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Old 07-25-2019, 04:02 PM   #2
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Are you replacing because it doesn't work?

If so, how did you determine it, not something else in the system, is faulty?
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Old 07-26-2019, 10:15 AM   #3
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Replacement Dometic Thermostat

Yes, it doesn't work. For months now, the LCD display gradually dimmed over time and then flickered on and off repeatedly until it just stopped displaying completely and of course none of the fan, AC, furnace and heat pump work. When I unscrewed the thermostat off the wall, it really flickered again, I reset the system and it just fades and flickers and then just doesn't display at all. But this will repeat if I touch the display, the wires, etc. So I concluded I should just replace what I thought would be an inexpensive thermostat, but they don't make it any more. I figured the labor to trouble shoot the system at a shop will far exceed the cost of me just replacing the thermostat. Little did I know it would be difficult to just replace a simple thermostat......
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Old 07-26-2019, 10:48 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickyRocketRVer View Post
Yes, it doesn't work. For months now, the LCD display gradually dimmed over time and then flickered on and off repeatedly until it just stopped displaying completely and of course none of the fan, AC, furnace and heat pump work. When I unscrewed the thermostat off the wall, it really flickered again, I reset the system and it just fades and flickers and then just doesn't display at all. But this will repeat if I touch the display, the wires, etc. So I concluded I should just replace what I thought would be an inexpensive thermostat, but they don't make it any more. I figured the labor to trouble shoot the system at a shop will far exceed the cost of me just replacing the thermostat. Little did I know it would be difficult to just replace a simple thermostat......
Have you checked here:
https://www.airxcel.com/coleman-mach...al-thermostats
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Old 07-26-2019, 07:54 PM   #5
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Bad solder joint

Quote:
Originally Posted by RickyRocketRVer View Post
Yes, it doesn't work. For months now, the LCD display gradually dimmed over time and then flickered on and off repeatedly until it just stopped displaying completely and of course none of the fan, AC, furnace and heat pump work. When I unscrewed the thermostat off the wall, it really flickered again, I reset the system and it just fades and flickers and then just doesn't display at all. But this will repeat if I touch the display, the wires, etc. So I concluded I should just replace what I thought would be an inexpensive thermostat, but they don't make it any more. I figured the labor to trouble shoot the system at a shop will far exceed the cost of me just replacing the thermostat. Little did I know it would be difficult to just replace a simple thermostat......
From your description it sounds like a bad solder joint on the printed circuit board. Take the thermostat to a good electronics technician (TV repair, cellphone repair, etc.) and have him touch up all the joints, using lead-free solder, which is what it likely was made with. Just melting and reflowing each joint should be sufficient. Only add solder if the joint appears starved.

{RANT}Lead-Free solder was foisted upon us by the European Economic Community. The non-technical folks learned that lead paint was dangerous and decided all lead must be dangerous. Lead is one of the most inert (inactive) metals and will last forever in a landfill without leaching into the ground. But the Europeans banned it and manufacturers worldwide switched to lead-free so they wouldn't have to have two production lines.

There are three main problems with lead-free solder.
--It is brittle. You could drop or mishandle an old camera or cellphone or trailer component and it would survive because tin-lead solder is ductile. Drop a lead-free assembly and the chips will break free from the circuit board.
--Tin whiskers are micro-thin structures that grow out of lead-free solder. It is not unheard of for them to grow several millimeters in length, and to short-circuit two adjacent terminals together. This is what happened in the loaner Toyota which ran away, killing the police officer and his family.
--Lead-free solder melts at a higher temperature than tin-lead solder. This means that the electronics components thus mounted undergo higher stress which could affect reliability and lifetime.{/RANT}
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:24 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry-NC View Post
From your description it sounds like a bad solder joint on the printed circuit board. Take the thermostat to a good electronics technician (TV repair, cellphone repair, etc.) and have him touch up all the joints, using lead-free solder, which is what it likely was made with. Just melting and reflowing each joint should be sufficient. Only add solder if the joint appears starved.

{RANT}Lead-Free solder was foisted upon us by the European Economic Community. The non-technical folks learned that lead paint was dangerous and decided all lead must be dangerous. Lead is one of the most inert (inactive) metals and will last forever in a landfill without leaching into the ground. But the Europeans banned it and manufacturers worldwide switched to lead-free so they wouldn't have to have two production lines.

There are three main problems with lead-free solder.
--It is brittle. You could drop or mishandle an old camera or cellphone or trailer component and it would survive because tin-lead solder is ductile. Drop a lead-free assembly and the chips will break free from the circuit board.
--Tin whiskers are micro-thin structures that grow out of lead-free solder. It is not unheard of for them to grow several millimeters in length, and to short-circuit two adjacent terminals together. This is what happened in the loaner Toyota which ran away, killing the police officer and his family.
--Lead-free solder melts at a higher temperature than tin-lead solder. This means that the electronics components thus mounted undergo higher stress which could affect reliability and lifetime.{/RANT}
You left out the part where almost all mass produced circuit boards today are "wave soldered" and it only takes one contaminated surface to keep the solder from adhering to both pins and board "trace" properly.

I fought this issue for a couple years on a Hot Tub controller board. Company finally had to change the design in order to get proper solder joints on the heater control relay(s). Ditto on an old Plasma TV with crappy solder joints on power supply.
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Old 07-27-2019, 03:07 PM   #7
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A little off topic

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Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
You left out the part where almost all mass produced circuit boards today are "wave soldered" and it only takes one contaminated surface to keep the solder from adhering to both pins and board "trace" properly.

I fought this issue for a couple years on a Hot Tub controller board. Company finally had to change the design in order to get proper solder joints on the heater control relay(s). Ditto on an old Plasma TV with crappy solder joints on power supply.
A little off topic, but I've seen that too. The trouble with wave soldering is that the exposure time and temperature of the wave is tuned for the fine leads of the typical components. If there are any substantially bigger (greater heat sinking capability) component pins, they get cold-soldered. I've had to repair that on my son's clothes dryer board for the big pins on the 240 VAC relay on a board otherwise populated with small electronic components. Also on a few other appliances.

Of course the pin size mismatch issue is not particularly related to lead-free solder. It can occur with tin-lead solder as well.

It doesn't help that lead-free solder doesn't "wet" as well as tin-lead solder. Ask your electronics tech or plumber.
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Old 07-28-2019, 11:28 AM   #8
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Below is a link to the thermostat and control board i used when i replaced my A/C unit with a A/C with heat pump. I would think if you could find just the T stat it would work with your control board.

https://pantherrvproducts.com/dometi...at-pump-white/
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