Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-07-2019, 11:00 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 1
RV park power outages

We are about ready to head out on our full time RV adventure. We have a 5th wheel Riverstone with a residential fridge. Our concern is the possibility of power outages in RV parks. Has anyone experienced this? What do you do when it happens? Do RV parks allow the use of generators during an outage? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
__________________

Lorrie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 11:12 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
KRedburn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Quincy, WA
Posts: 503
Been there before. IF your generator has an auto start feature you should be good for a number of hours if setup correctly.

What happened to me. Plugged in to shore power. Power outage occurred. Electrical system switched to battery and inverter. Frig was powered up continuously. A/C dropped off line but was not needed. Was on inverter for 10 hours batteries depleted to 12V and generator auto started. Life's good. And the generator didn't come on until daylight hours so no issue with campground.


__________________

__________________
Ken and Kathy Redburn
2018 DX3 37TS (The Taj)
KRedburn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 11:17 AM   #3
western NC mountains!
 
formerFR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: western NC mountains!
Posts: 1,978
RV parks and campgrounds, and everyone else for that matter, can and will have a power outage, even if just for a second, or for hours, though very infrequently.

No rv park or campground is going to penalize you for using a generator if the power is out for an extended time, especially during the daylight hours. They would probably be using their own generator, as well.

It's not something that you should worry about, though. No one is going to die... matter of fact, many rv parks and campgrounds are the places folks WANT to go when the power is out - such as after weather events - they are then full of power line workers and others, working to restore power in the area, all running their generators!
formerFR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 11:20 AM   #4
western NC mountains!
 
formerFR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: western NC mountains!
Posts: 1,978
and yes, if you have an onboard generator, like many of us do, and an AGS(auto gen starter), you can easily manage 'power outages', whether accidental while parked and plugged in at an rv park, or intentional when just simply parked 'off grid'...

the Inverter will kick in when the power is lost - that's it's job, IF you leave it on when you are plugged in. The inverter will provide you 120v power to the fridge and maybe some of your other outlets during that time, and when the batteries get to a certain level, the AGS will start the generator, or you can manually.
formerFR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 11:21 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: North of Seattle, WA
Posts: 3,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorrie View Post
We are about ready to head out on our full time RV adventure. We have a 5th wheel Riverstone with a residential fridge. Our concern is the possibility of power outages in RV parks. Has anyone experienced this? What do you do when it happens? Do RV parks allow the use of generators during an outage? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
I think it would be hard to deny the use of generators if their power "grid" went down. If I was parked close enough to their office I'd tell them to round up some extension cords and plug into mine. That way they could at least run their phone and computer system.

Now if it was just one pedestal that was down, probably won't want generator running. Just plug into the next pedestal. Another reason I carry an extension for my main power cord.
__________________
Sami. my Shih-Tsu "Co-Pilot" R.I.P
Politically Incorrect since 1943
"Sometimes you're the dog, sometimes you're the tree"

2018 Flagstaff Micro Lite 25BDS
2004 Nissan Titan
TitanMike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 11:42 AM   #6
Denver To Yuma In 90 Days
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Yuma, Arizona
Posts: 3,882
I full-timed last year for six months and experienced over 10 power outages at RV parks.

Most were an hour or less, but a couple of them were an all day event!

Also, while up in South Dakota last June, the RV park was experiencing a power overload issue as it was over 100 degrees up there and everyone running their RV's AC units kept overheating their power panel.

As for the fridge...as long as you don't open it during an outage you should be good for 4-5 hours.
JohnD10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 11:49 AM   #7
Fulltime family RVer
 
ependydad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 18,344
We traveled extensively for 3 years and then have fulltimed for the past almost 4 years. With the RV parks I have been to, extended power outages were pretty rare. The longest that I recall was about 18 hours (around 3am to 8pm). A transformer went out on a holiday week/weekend and the campground had a generator towed in.



Other than that, there have been lots of little blips were the power goes off for less than 5 minutes.

A bigger issue is finding low voltage at parks. Some places will growl at you for running your generator then. I ended up adding in a Hughes AutoFormer to boost voltage coming into the rig.



Before I had it, I adapted down to 30amp power a couple of times because the voltage was only low on one leg.
__________________
2018 Ram 3500 DRW/crew cab/long bed/4x4/4.10 gears pulling a 2017 Spartan 1245 by Prime Time
Checkout my site for RVing tips, tricks, and info | My family and I have fulltimed since June 2015
ependydad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 12:34 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: North of Seattle, WA
Posts: 3,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by ependydad View Post
We traveled extensively for 3 years and then have fulltimed for the past almost 4 years. With the RV parks I have been to, extended power outages were pretty rare. The longest that I recall was about 18 hours (around 3am to 8pm). A transformer went out on a holiday week/weekend and the campground had a generator towed in.



Other than that, there have been lots of little blips were the power goes off for less than 5 minutes.

A bigger issue is finding low voltage at parks. Some places will growl at you for running your generator then. I ended up adding in a Hughes AutoFormer to boost voltage coming into the rig.



Before I had it, I adapted down to 30amp power a couple of times because the voltage was only low on one leg.
Get enough people running the AutoFormers and the voltage problem in the park can get worse. Yes, YOU get the higher voltage but in order to get it, your AutoFormer draws more current. Wattage in will always equal wattage out less whatever inefficiencies in the Autoformer. To get the same wattage in as the output, current HAS to increase if voltage is low. More current in the park system and more voltage drop in their distribution system.

As more and more people buy larger and larger RV's with multiple A/C units and parks get older and older with undersized power distribution systems, Low Voltage will become more common. Of course if they "blow a transformer" then the power company will install a larger replacement and things might get better.

I've stopped in some parks that have "No AutoFormers allowed" and also "No Electric Heaters" in their Park Rules. Usually older parks in out of the way locations with some pretty beat up power outlets.
__________________
Sami. my Shih-Tsu "Co-Pilot" R.I.P
Politically Incorrect since 1943
"Sometimes you're the dog, sometimes you're the tree"

2018 Flagstaff Micro Lite 25BDS
2004 Nissan Titan
TitanMike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 01:21 PM   #9
Canadian Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Eastern GTA, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanMike View Post
Get enough people running the AutoFormers and the voltage problem in the park can get worse. Yes, YOU get the higher voltage but in order to get it, your AutoFormer draws more current. Wattage in will always equal wattage out less whatever inefficiencies in the Autoformer. To get the same wattage in as the output, current HAS to increase if voltage is low. More current in the park system and more voltage drop in their distribution system.

As more and more people buy larger and larger RV's with multiple A/C units and parks get older and older with undersized power distribution systems, Low Voltage will become more common. Of course if they "blow a transformer" then the power company will install a larger replacement and things might get better.

I've stopped in some parks that have "No AutoFormers allowed" and also "No Electric Heaters" in their Park Rules. Usually older parks in out of the way locations with some pretty beat up power outlets.
The complaints about Autoformers have been around for a long time. If the Autoformer draws more current to increase voltage, it still won't be able to draw more than the pedestal breaker will allow so I don't understand the problem.

Are you suggesting that campground systems can't handle supplying near full amperage to all the pedestals on a line?
__________________
2019 Rockwood Signature 8290BS
2016 Ford F-250 XLT SuperCrew, 6.2L, 4x4, 6'9" bed, 3.73, w/ snow plow & camper pkgs.
2011 Rockwood Signature 8293SS (2015 - 2018)
2010 Rockwood Roo 23SS (2012 - 2014)

itat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2019, 01:31 PM   #10
Canadian Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Eastern GTA, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorrie View Post
We are about ready to head out on our full time RV adventure. We have a 5th wheel Riverstone with a residential fridge. Our concern is the possibility of power outages in RV parks. Has anyone experienced this? What do you do when it happens? Do RV parks allow the use of generators during an outage? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
We've experienced that a couple of times. We never "camp" without an electrical hookup so we aren't setup for that. We've only ever had a single Group 24 Interstate battery from the dealer. I can say that from that experience, that battery won't last too long. So you'll need to have a couple good quality true deep cell batteries and if the onboard generator will kick in automatically when the batteries get low, you should be fine. The only generator that people would likely complain about would be the open framed contractor style generator, but in a long power outage I'd think you wouldn't get many complaints about that if you ran it during the day and offered to share the power.
__________________

__________________
2019 Rockwood Signature 8290BS
2016 Ford F-250 XLT SuperCrew, 6.2L, 4x4, 6'9" bed, 3.73, w/ snow plow & camper pkgs.
2011 Rockwood Signature 8293SS (2015 - 2018)
2010 Rockwood Roo 23SS (2012 - 2014)

itat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
power

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:14 AM.