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Old 07-08-2013, 10:04 PM   #11
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Location: North Carolina
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The first thing you need to do is better understand your trucks capabilities than just my truck can tow x lbs. (I learned this the hard way). Most TV are limited by their payload and not their towing capacity. To find out your TVs true towing capacities then you need to go weigh it. Load the tv up with all occupants, pets, and cargo that will be in it when towing plus a full tank of fuel and then go weigh it at a local scale (CAT Scale ). Weigh each axle on a separate scale pad so it will give you a breakdown of front and rear axle weights individually and a total weight. Take the scaled Truck weight and subtract it from your Truck gcwr (gross combined weight rating) to get your adjusted towng capacity (the loaded weight of trailer needs to be less than this). Take the scaled weight and subtract it from your Trucks gvwr (gross vehicle weight rating) to get your available payload. The loaded tongue weight needs to be subtracted from the available payload. You also need to know your RAWR (rear axle weight rating) and the actual weight of the rear axle (same for the front axle, FAWR). The tongue weight will add weight to your rear axle (although a wdh will transfer some weight to front axle and some weight back to trailer, the majority of the tongue weight will still hit the rear axle). You need to be within all of these ratings.

Next understand you will never tow an unloaded or dry trailer. Those numbers are somewhat irrelevant. You can either add the amount of weight of cargo you will tow to the dry weight (this is heavier than you think as most add 1000-2000 lb of gear) or simply use the tt gvwr to do your calculations. Being that this is your first tt, using the tt gvwr is the safer route for you. Next understand that the tt loaded tongue weight needs to be subtracted from your available payload. The loaded tongue weight is typically 13-15% of the loaded tt weight. For your purposes go with 13-15% of the tt gvwr. Hopefully this helps clarify some things for you.

ps if you can't get to a scale look at the tire loading sticker in your door for "all cargo and occupants not to exceed x lbs". subtract the weight of family and gear from that and you have a rough payload. you can work backwards. if you have 800 lbs available payload then you are looking at no more than 5300 lbs loaded weight (800 lb payload/.15 for tongue weight percent=5300).

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2014 Crew Cab Chevy Silverado 3500 4wd Duramax/Allison
2014 Sabre 34REQS-6
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Old 07-08-2013, 10:21 PM   #12
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Lexington, Ky
Posts: 419
I went from a hybrid TT to a 36' TT with a dry weight of 7200. Based on all of the specs I was at my limit for my Yukon XL with tow pkg. I had plenty of engine but did not take into account the "push" from big rigs on the interstate. My first trip was 30m from home but I had my family drive seperate as I was not comfortable. Purchased a good used 2500 and no worries. The rigidity of the frame is so much more superior on a 3/4 vs 1/2 ton. I have since graduated to a fiver and kept the truck. If I knew then what I know now I would have skipped the TT and gone direct to the fiver once I got the correct TV...Good luck and you are doing the right thing by asking for advice.

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