Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-10-2016, 10:35 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
thebrakeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canton, Michigan
Posts: 1,105
Yeah. From that perspective, the V6-tow package Durango would be a good choice. Decent mileage, and still 6500 lbs potential, which would be enough to handle your next camper up through a loaded weight of 5000+.
__________________

__________________
thebrakeman ('70), DW ('71), DD ('99), DD ('01), DD ('05)
2004 Surveyor SV261T (UltraLite Bunkhouse Hybrid)
2006 Mercury Mountaineer V8 AWD Premier
Equal-i-zer WDH (10k), Prodigy Brake Controller
thebrakeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 01:19 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: La Crosse, WI
Posts: 34
We tow our 2013 R pod 178 with a Chrysler Town and Country or a Jeep Liberty. We have a weight distribution hitch and sway bar. Both work well but personally, I like the longer wheel base of the mini van for towing.
__________________

__________________
Debbie and Erv
2013 Lily Pad
Jeep Liberty or Town and Country Mini van
DebbieHM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 02:26 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 61
The new Jeep Cherokee will handle the R-pod just fine. I have a R-pod 182-G and tow with a Chev 1500 crew cab. Nice combo, but just bought the DW a Cherokee as a back-up in case the truck is not working. Did my homework and saw that the Cherokee would work fine.

Backpacker
__________________
glfillion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 02:36 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 45
We started with an Rpod 179 pulled with a Honda Odyssey. It was within the tow limits but just barely and it really worked the car. I really felt sorry for it.
Next we purchased a Ford F-150 and it pulls it like a dream and the mileage was actually better with the truck.
Of course since we had all of that pulling power we have now purchased a larger camper. Unfortunately I think I'm a little oversized again.
Lessons learned:
The tow vehicle should be at least 25-35% bigger than the ratings indicate. Bigger is better especially if you are pulling up mountains.
Towing capacity isn't the who story. Read all of the postings about Gross vehicle weight etc.
We loved our Rpod but it soon felt too small. If you think you will go bigger its better to get a bigger TV so you aren't shopping again next year.
Read all of the towing ratings from the manufacturer.
Assume that the dealers (car and camper) don't know what they are talking about. Let the buyer beware!
It is worth spending a lot of time and energy investigating your decision.
Finally - have a great time.
__________________
2013 Ford F150 3.5 Ecoboost 4X4
Rockwood Ultralight 2618vs
UltraV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 02:36 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Shenandoah Valley, VA
Posts: 477
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegarrs View Post
Ideally, we'd like to get a lease-return, low-mileage SUV (my wife's really not a truck person) that doesn't drive like a tank around town and has more versatility than a pickup.
In my opinion there is nothing more versatile than a 4 door crew cab pick-up. Unless you want 3rd row seating, I can think of nothing that an SUV can do that a pick-up couldn't. The fact that the truck has a bed for hauling stuff is what makes it much more versatile for me. Your wife may not like it now, but test drive a new(er) 1/2 ton crew cab and she may change her mind. I'm a rather avid DIY'er around the house so it seems I am constantly hauling "stuff". If that isn't beneficial to you, then there seems to be some good advice on SUV's already posted.
Good luck!
__________________
2016 Flagstaff 23LB
howie70 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 02:39 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 45
One more thing. Check out the Rpod forums. There is tons of information (fact and opinions) about tow vehicles.
__________________
2013 Ford F150 3.5 Ecoboost 4X4
Rockwood Ultralight 2618vs
UltraV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 03:02 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: indiana
Posts: 586
I am of the opinion you can't have too much tow vehicle. Towing at the vehicle's limits is scary at best and dangerous at worst. Most suvs are softly sprung to give a cushy ride. However , a cushy ride is not what you want when pulling 3500 lbs around behind you. You want stout brakes, a firm suspension, and a cooling system capable of preventing engine and transmission meltdown.
Payload is the other thing many people overlook. Typically, suvs are low on payload capabilities. The r pod has a tongue weight unloaded less than 300 lbs which is pretty low and gives you greater leeway in choosing a vehicle.
I'm not going to recommend any particular vehicle. That's a matter of personal taste. My main suggestion is that you choose a vehicle with more capability than you need. Your location dictates this.
Good luck.
__________________
Jim and Deb
Many times..asst grandkids
2015 Shamrock 23ikss
2013 Ram 1500
jking46 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 03:14 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Liverpool NY
Posts: 630
2016 Cherokee Towing

Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrakeman View Post
Yeah, I forgot the Jeeps. A 1-2 year old Grand Cherokee V6 would be a nice find. Does anyone know how the new Cherokee (not the Grand) is at towing? I don't know if it can be fitted for more than 3500 lbs.
3.2L V-6 is 4,500 WITH towing package per Trailer Life 2016 Towing Guide.
__________________
2015 Shamrock 231KSS, Oyster shell
2016 Chev Silverado LT Z71 Ext. Cab, 4x4, 5.3L V/8
Reese Straight Line WDH, 2000W Honda Gen.
2 Old Town kayaks & 2 Boston Terriers - Zoey/Gonzo
Lar & Ruth
55 nights camping 2015, 45 in 2016, 42 in 2017
CNYCamper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 04:15 PM   #19
KVA
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1
Post

[QUOTE=thegarrs;1098996]Howdy!

I'm new to the Forum and new to trailering, so please be gentle... My wife and I retired from tent camping last year and bought a new (2015) R-Pod 178. We took six trips last summer, using her 2006 SAAB wagon to pull the R-pod. It has a stated towing capacity of 3,500 lbs, which we thought would work out with a lightly-loaded, 2,500-lb R-pod. It performed pretty well, but we have some pretty steep, long climbs out of the Salt Lake Valley (our home) to get to a lot of our favorite places. With the SAAB, we just kissed the "H" temperature a few times, but never had to pull over to let the engine cool.

The SAAB is probably getting too old for this and there are many places we'd like to go that are higher and steeper than we've gone. We'd like to get a vehicle that we'll have confidence in. This would also be my wife's commuting vehicle, so she insists it not be a pickup.

In talking to friends who pull R-pods, we've gotten all kinds of often conflicting information. For example, one friend has an Xterra with a tow rating of 5,000 lbs, but he's unhappy with the power. Another swears by his Ford 150 truck. I've learned over the years to simply not believe dealers, so, coupled with my very limited knowledge of cars, trucks, etc., I'm in sort of a pickle.

Ideally, we'd like to get a lease-return, low-mileage SUV (my wife's really not a truck person) that doesn't drive like a tank around town and has more versatility than a pickup.

So, I thought I'd take a survey, of sorts, and see what experienced owners use to pull their R-pods. Any suggestions?

Thanks,

thegarrs

We bought an R-Pod 178 a few months ago & have towed it over 2000 miles with a Honda Pilot 2016 (we had to have a trailer package added) from Arkansas to the Dakotas. Speed 70-75 MPH. Gas 8-11 MPG. We have had 2 other Pilots (2013;2014--which already had a trailer package) which we have used to pull a horse trailer & 14' boat; gas mileage about the same. We love the R-Pod & have spent up to 10 days in it. A sway bar we added was worth its wait in gold.
KVA
__________________
KVA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 04:40 PM   #20
Member
 
Admiral_Roo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 85
Torque is everything, stability is next

Quote:
Originally Posted by thegarrs View Post
Howdy!

I'm new to the Forum and new to trailering, so please be gentle... My wife and I retired from tent camping last year and bought a new (2015) R-Pod 178. We took six trips last summer, using her 2006 SAAB wagon to pull the R-pod. It has a stated towing capacity of 3,500 lbs, which we thought would work out with a lightly-loaded, 2,500-lb R-pod. It performed pretty well, but we have some pretty steep, long climbs out of the Salt Lake Valley (our home) to get to a lot of our favorite places. With the SAAB, we just kissed the "H" temperature a few times, but never had to pull over to let the engine cool.

The SAAB is probably getting too old for this and there are many places we'd like to go that are higher and steeper than we've gone. We'd like to get a vehicle that we'll have confidence in. This would also be my wife's commuting vehicle, so she insists it not be a pickup.

In talking to friends who pull R-pods, we've gotten all kinds of often conflicting information. For example, one friend has an Xterra with a tow rating of 5,000 lbs, but he's unhappy with the power. Another swears by his Ford 150 truck. I've learned over the years to simply not believe dealers, so, coupled with my very limited knowledge of cars, trucks, etc., I'm in sort of a pickle.

Ideally, we'd like to get a lease-return, low-mileage SUV (my wife's really not a truck person) that doesn't drive like a tank around town and has more versatility than a pickup.

So, I thought I'd take a survey, of sorts, and see what experienced owners use to pull their R-pods. Any suggestions?

Thanks,

thegarrs
You'll probably be ok with a V6 but check the torque rating as this is more important than the horsepower or the manufacturers tow rating (which can be VERY misleading). I can tell you from experience to over kill your tow vehicle in comparison to the trailer. Doesn't have to be a full size truck in your case but should be at least a mid size SUV with a payload of at least 1200lbs and a strong, torquey V6. You should test tow before buying if possible to not only check out the hill climbing ability of the vehicle but also ensure the tail doesn't wag the dog from a stability standpoint as well.
__________________

__________________
TV - Whatever I can rent!
2014 Rockwood Roo 25RS
Nights camped 2014 - 27, 2015 - 28, 2016 - 31
Nights camped so far 2017 - 16
Admiral_Roo2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
towing

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:20 PM.