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Old 01-06-2011, 08:23 AM   #11
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Here are the stats on a 2006 312BHBS:

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Since I don't have all of the stats on the tow vehicle, I will compare to my truck (F150 Super Cab, 5.4 L engine, 3.73 gears) with similar stats as the 2008 Chevy.

The 10,985 GVWR limit is way over my 9300 tow rating, plus the 9900 lb. hitch rating.

The dry hitch weight of 825 lbs. will probably "grow" to well over 1000 lbs. loaded for camping. The hitch on my truck is rated for 990 lb. maximum tongue weight with weight distributing.

According to some popular charts and equations, my 145" wheelbased truck should be limited to a 29 foot trailer......a 34 footer is a long trailer.

No way would I consider this trailer with my truck.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:54 AM   #12
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Go to web site(Changingears.com) you supply the info they tell you what it will tow! Youroo!!
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Old 01-06-2011, 09:33 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by youroo View Post
Go to web site(Changingears.com) you supply the info they tell you what it will tow! Youroo!!
The problem with using the excellent calculators on that web site is that it only confirms AFTER the fact whether you are screwed or not. You will need to load your rig as you camp it. Dry weights and curb weights are the minimum your vehicle and camper will weight. You still need to put yourself, your jammies, your chow, and all your toys in yet.

There are some very smart folks here who can give you valuable first hand experience towing overloaded and over-lengthed. Many found themselves in this condition after being assured by dealers that they "would be just fine."
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Old 01-06-2011, 03:10 PM   #14
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I have a chevy avalanch z71 with the 5.3 motor and am pulling a 6500 dry weight tv in W.V lots of mtns I am getting ready to up grade to a bigger truck. You can pull it you just cant pull it good.
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Old 01-07-2011, 10:52 PM   #15
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You might be able to pull it but stopping it is also another thing to consider and keep in mind -
- the 1/2 ton (1500) brakes are smaller then a 3/4 ton (2500) and will fade with that much weight even though the trailer has brakes as well so keep that in mind

I would guess the 10,500 is for a 2500 - I have a 2004 Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 and know my max trailer weight is 8,600 - would think yours is close to what mine is maybe a little more but not 2,000 lbs more - just throwing that out there is all
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Old 01-08-2011, 12:34 AM   #16
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We have a Stealth 2612 towed by a 2010 F-150 FX4 Screw. Our truck weighed in about 7500 loaded and the TH about 8000 (roughly 15,500 combined). The truck is rated at 11,300 towing and it did well. We took a trip from WA to FL and back with no issues. We drove in ice, snow, wind (head and side), 75+ MPH, 55 MPH (CA), and it performed well. We drove through WA, ID, MT, WY, CO, KS, MO, KY, TN, GA, FL, AL, MS, TN, AR, TX, NM, AZ, CA, OR, AND WA. We did an oil change when we got to GA and another one soon when I reach 10,000 miles on my truck. We use an equalizer E4 hitch and it worked well.

Here are a few observations we made:
1. It costs roughly $11/HR of driving 70-75 MPH, but it gained us a day of driving.
2. E85 sucks!!! cheaper though.
3. Regular gas yields lesser gas mileage than premium, but when the cost is within $.20 of each other, the mileage comes out the same. If the cost difference is less/more, then the mileage difference is significant/negligible respectively.
4. Mandatory 55 MPH in CA blows!!! Although it yields about 9.6 - 10.1 MPG.
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Old 01-08-2011, 01:36 AM   #17
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Kenn, I need a math lesson. Item 4 above, yields 10 mpg. That is what I get at 60 mph. Item 1 above, it cost $11.00 per hour at 75 mph. First of all, most trailer tires are only rated for 60 mph. Second, at 10 mpg, and a speed of 60 mph, that equals 6 gallons per hour. Now with the cost of gas at $3.00 per gallon, that is $18.00 per hour, just for gas. Sorry, as a pilot, I sometimes figure in gallons per hour, multiplied by the cost of fuel, equals cost per hour. Help with your numbers please.
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Old 01-08-2011, 08:48 AM   #18
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kenn, it sounds like you are one of those characters that we all dread, towing an overloaded unit too fast. You say that your tow rating is 11,300, but with your truck at 7500#, you only have 9400# of towing capacity, and that is maxed right out. Considering most F150s have towing capability much lower than yours, I wonder how dependable that inflated number from Ford really is.
If you are willing to risk the lives of yourself and others to save a few hours drive time, maybe you should reconsider your priorities?
Slow down, camping is meant to be relaxing!
Just a friendly suggestion.
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Old 01-08-2011, 08:58 AM   #19
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Windrider,

1. We were in CA flats going 60 MPH, that's when we yielded 10 MPH. All other states we were going an average of 70-75 MPH and through the mountains.

4. On the way down, we were getting about 9.5 MPG at 60 and about 7.3 MPG at 75. We divided the trip in two 1500-mile legs. Our average gas price that we paid was about $3.45/gal. We spent roughly 709/545 gals on the way down/up respectively. I took the difference between the two and divided it with the time we gained on the way down.

Our truck was easy to get past 60 MPH if you're not watching it, especially with a light load. So, the lesson we learned for next trip:

1. Plan longer for travel.
2. Drive at lower speeds (60-65 MPH is money!)
3. Drive shorter days.

P.S. As a fellow pilot, I understand what you mean. I like numbers, hence the boredom of computing these numbers on the way back. We weren't concerned about the extra cost, for we valued the time more than the money at that instance. Christmas break was so short.

Crocus,

Thanks for the suggestion! I agree that camping should be relaxing. It was a bit taxing to make a FL trip and back in 2+ weeks. As far as the weight, we we're loaded down due to stuff in the bed of the truck and trailer full of water. As far as towing too fast, I agree with you. It was too fast. This would be the heaviest the truck/trailer combo would be.
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:56 AM   #20
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Kenn,

Not to but you really should get valid weights for your truck and camper, unloaded and loaded for camping, at a CAT (or equivalent) weight scale. Then plug the numbers into a good calculator like Travel Trailer Weight Calculator

I think your will find that your truck axles and GVW are way over the top.
A panic stop at speed, or a sudden gust of wind, could result in a quite spectacular wreck. There are many incredible videos of these on YouTube, so you are not the Lone Ranger when it comes to pushing over-grossed rigs past all reasonable limits.
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