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Old 08-02-2016, 10:46 AM   #11
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Most people set and forget on a brake controller. Optimum braking is to set it "just" short of trailer lock up. It should be readjusted when road conditions change. I usually just back mine down two levels in the rain and start slowing sooner.
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Old 08-02-2016, 12:30 PM   #12
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Start slowing down sooner. Stopping a lot of weight on a slick road downhill has gravity and friction working against you.
Welcome to towing! X2 on starting to slow down sooner, even if the light is green you never know if someone else is going to have an issue and slide through the intersection (like you did). I have towed in the rain more times than I care to count and just slow everything way down, become very cautious at intersections and in town.
It's a learning curve. Slow down for that too!
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Old 08-02-2016, 05:00 PM   #13
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slick roads

We camp around San Antonio and some of the roads around there are very slippery every time it rains. We have seen 5th wheels that couldn't get up the hills as their tow vehicles tires started spinning.
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Old 08-02-2016, 07:04 PM   #14
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I see three things that you need to look at. The first is when ever you hook up always start your truck moving forward and apply your trailer breaks using the break controller. This will insure you have a complete circuit. Start moving again and apply all your breaks using the brake pedal. Your breaks should be set at about 60% on the trailer and 40% on the truck. The best gauge for this will be a slight tug from the trailer before the truck in gauges. Last always assume wet roads are going to be like driving on ice until you test it. As you found with new construction the western half of the U.S. goes for long periods of time without rain and accumulates a lot of oil. OH yes! read your break control manual, there are a lot of different controllers on the market and they all work a little different. Hope this helps.
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Old 08-03-2016, 12:46 AM   #15
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Thanks for all your replies. I have alot to learn, just glad nobody got hurt. I'm gonna have the brakes on the trailer checked out and go over the brake controller manual again. I thought I was going slow for the corner but maybe I was just getting too comfortable. Still need to look into the ABS also.
Again Thanks, Scott
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Old 08-03-2016, 08:38 PM   #16
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I have been RVing for over half of my 68 years and I think I learn something each time I make a trip. Either that or I forget what I've learned which is probably the case.

There's so many things to think about. I use a check list now because my memory is not as good as I'd like. Over the years, I've driven off with the steps down, door open, antenna up, tongue unlatched, you name it. One of my close calls was pulling up a steep bridge in the rain in Mobile, Al area and hitting the steel span that opens for boats. My TV lost traction as soon as I hit the steel and my TT kept coming. Of all the wrong things I've done, that time I had my trailer brakes set properly. Like you, it scared the daylights out of me.

I appreciate you mentioning this incident because it reminds me to pay attention.
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Old 08-12-2016, 11:15 AM   #17
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What brake controller are you using?
What is your tow vehicle?
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Old 08-12-2016, 11:57 AM   #18
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I've use a Curt Tri-Flex for the last four years and really like it.
My tow vehicle is a 2004, 2500 with a 5.9 HP
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Old 08-15-2016, 01:20 PM   #19
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Your breaks should be set at about 60% on the trailer and 40% on the truck. The best gauge for this will be a slight tug from the trailer before the truck in gauges.
*brakes* not *breaks*

and this is not necessarily true on newer trucks with integrated controllers. On my 2004 F150 this was true.

With my 2012 F150 the trailer brake force is proportional to the truck braking pressure, so you don't get that initial "tug" from a trailer even when it is set up correctly.
This makes for a much more comfortable tow, but requires some better judgement when setting your gain.
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Old 08-23-2016, 12:09 PM   #20
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With the Tekonsha controllers (Prodigy, P2, P3), you set the controller for proportional braking. That is, so that when you apply a panic stop in the tow vehicle, the trailer will receive the voltage necessary to almost lock the brakes, but not quite. In this case, you should not feel the trailer "leading" the braking event.


But if you are the type that prefers to feel the trailer "tug" or "lead" the braking event, you simply set the boost feature to "b1". This applies about 10% of max braking voltage as soon as you touch the brake pedal. So if you are set to 8 volts as your maximum, you'll get 0.8volts to the trailer before you get any braking at the truck. If you want more initial braking, you can select b2 or b3.
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