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Old 03-08-2012, 03:22 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Triguy View Post
Good question. Here's my logic.

Its been my experience that I have better results not pushing the limits of product ratings. I've made some mistakes that have bitten me later on. So, when I can, I like to have the rating be in excess of what I need it for. Hence the 1,000 bars even though, technically, the 600lb bars might be sufficient.

This is not always possible for me, of course. For example, I currently am pushing the limits of my TV's payload, although I am still below it. In my case, I am happy to push the limit as the alternative would be relatively expensive.

In the OP's case, the cost is de minimus going from 600lb to 1,000 lb bars, other people have reported good experiences using heavier bars with the Equal-i-izer WDH and Progressive says that its engineered to be that way.

Also, I'd be concerned that the OPs trailer is heavier than they think once its loaded up for a real camping trip (A good reason to weigh it when setting out on a real trip). The trailer's GVWR is 4,700lbs which might give them a TW of over 600lbs. So, practically, the 1,000 lb bars give them room to pack and not worry about it.
Good explanation. I like to allow some wiggle room as well. I was a little concerned the bars may be too stiff. Like you said most people will underestimate weights. Thanks!
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Old 03-08-2012, 05:32 PM   #12
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I'd like to get some feedback on this as well. I'm in a similar position only I currently own an Equal-i-zer rated at 1,000/10,000. I am down-sizing my TT and will be picking up a 2306 in a couple weeks. I was concerned about the hitch being too stiff for the frame and not providing enough "give" potentially damaging the frame. I contacted Progressive Manufacturing and they said my current hitch was fine. However, I also contacted Forest River and they did not recommend using a hitch rated that high. That's the dilemma. I would prefer not to purchase a new hitch and it is good to hear that it tows well with the higher bars but if the manufacturer recommends not using then then...

PG, I'd recommend contacting FR directly and getting a second opinion on this. I believe I spoke to someone named Greg.
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Old 03-08-2012, 09:03 PM   #13
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This is why I let my 1000/10,000 go with my larger trailer I just sold to by my 19rr. Still a little confused. I figured with the 19rr I would need the 600/6000. I am going to see how it pulls before I buy anything.
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Old 03-08-2012, 11:39 PM   #14
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PG, I'd recommend contacting FR directly and getting a second opinion on this. I believe I spoke to someone named Greg.
if that is Gregg Rollins, the Rockwood rep, i would trust Progressive over his opinion.
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Old 03-08-2012, 11:48 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by buckeyefan View Post
I would have even taken the 1200/12000 or the 1400/14000 bars had they offered.
You never know when you will buy a larger trailer and there is more market for higher capacity bars than lower capacity bars. You my $.02... $.98 more will get you a coffee :>)
I would respectfully disagree with this point of view. Overly stiff bars give you a bad ride and can even damage your trailer frame is severe cases.
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Old 03-09-2012, 06:44 AM   #16
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Couldnt you just adjust to reduce the tension on the bars? Or am I missing something here?
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Old 03-09-2012, 08:53 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by edman87k5 View Post
Couldnt you just adjust to reduce the tension on the bars? Or am I missing something here?
Adjusting the tension on the bars will not give you the proper weight distribution.

Heavier spring bars on level ground are not the problem. You adjust the bars so you get weight back on the front end of the tow vehicle....in most cases you want to be close to the weight without the trailer hooked up.

The problem occurs when you go through a dip, like a big swell entering a gas station or someplace like that. Heavy bars with a lite trailer tongue weight are going to tend to pick up the back of the tow vehicle, and maybe put too much weight on the tow vehicle front axle. Also, if the bars don't give, then it is more likely that the rear of the trailer might drag in those situations, especially for us that have low riding trailers. I try to hit dips at an angle to prevent over stressing the WDH, and also to prevent the rear of the trailer from dragging.....or even look for a better way in and out of places where I want to stop.

If the spring bars are overly heavy, and if the trailer tongue does not have enough weight to spring the bars, then going down the road the tow vehicle will feel stiff in the back end.

I realize that someone posted here that Progressive Manufacturing told them that heavier bars than needed are OK. I can't argue with them, as they have structural engineers for their products. But, I sometimes wonder if they consider the structure of the tow vehicle and trailer.

IMHO, bars should be sized according to the load to prevent stress problems on the tow vehicle and trailer, and for the overall towing experience. If the actual tongue weight is within 50 lbs. of a set of lighter bars, then maybe going up to the next weight might be needed....as long as that weight bars cover that weight. Generally, spring bars cover the weights of 1/2 to the maximum of the load. So 1000 lb. spring bars will range from 500 to 1000 lbs. But, for a 500 lb. trailer tongue, 600 lb. bars (300 to 600 lbs.) might be a better fit, as long as good weight distribution can be obtained.
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:29 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by mtnguy View Post
Adjusting the tension on the bars will not give you the proper weight distribution.

Heavier spring bars on level ground are not the problem. You adjust the bars so you get weight back on the front end of the tow vehicle....in most cases you want to be close to the weight without the trailer hooked up.

The problem occurs when you go through a dip, like a big swell entering a gas station or someplace like that. Heavy bars with a lite trailer tongue weight are going to tend to pick up the back of the tow vehicle, and maybe put too much weight on the tow vehicle front axle. Also, if the bars don't give, then it is more likely that the rear of the trailer might drag in those situations, especially for us that have low riding trailers. I try to hit dips at an angle to prevent over stressing the WDH, and also to prevent the rear of the trailer from dragging.....or even look for a better way in and out of places where I want to stop.

If the spring bars are overly heavy, and if the trailer tongue does not have enough weight to spring the bars, then going down the road the tow vehicle will feel stiff in the back end.

I realize that someone posted here that Progressive Manufacturing told them that heavier bars than needed are OK. I can't argue with them, as they have structural engineers for their products. But, I sometimes wonder if they consider the structure of the tow vehicle and trailer.

IMHO, bars should be sized according to the load to prevent stress problems on the tow vehicle and trailer, and for the overall towing experience. If the actual tongue weight is within 50 lbs. of a set of lighter bars, then maybe going up to the next weight might be needed....as long as that weight bars cover that weight. Generally, spring bars cover the weights of 1/2 to the maximum of the load. So 1000 lb. spring bars will range from 500 to 1000 lbs. But, for a 500 lb. trailer tongue, 600 lb. bars (300 to 600 lbs.) might be a better fit, as long as good weight distribution can be obtained.
This is one of the best explanations I have seen on this post. Thanks!
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:45 AM   #19
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I recently emailed both Equalizer and Etrailer.com asking the same question about my Roo 19 (similar weights) and using a 1000/10,000 WD hitch. Basically both stated that the 1000/10,000 was the way to go and would also provide room to grow. They also said that the Equalizer has adjustments that would allow the stabilzer bars to be used safely even if under 600 lbs TW.

I think for those of us with trailers on the borderline it's a tough call, but I would think it's safer to have too much hitch rather than not enough. I'd rather have a bumpy ride than a hitch busting loose.
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Old 03-09-2012, 10:06 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by bikendan View Post
if that is Gregg Rollins, the Rockwood rep, i would trust Progressive over his opinion.
Wow, interesting take! I'm not the OP but thanks everyone for your inputs. I had resolved that I would need a new hitch but I am leaning towards just keeping the 1,000/10,000 Equal-i-zer I have now and just seeing how it goes.
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