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Old 04-24-2014, 04:39 PM   #11
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If you're ever parked next to OC...disable this feature on your truck! LOL
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Old 04-24-2014, 05:20 PM   #12
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Never shut ours down to refuel.
X2
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Old 04-24-2014, 05:26 PM   #13
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Like was said above, by the time you exit and get to the pump it is usually enough time. There have been a few times I have sat and idled out of the way before pulling into pump though. I always shut down during fueling.
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Old 04-25-2014, 12:40 AM   #14
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Your newer diesel you are better off not letting it idle too long. Typically if I plan to let mine sit for more than a couple of minutes I will shut it off. Any less and I will let it keep running.
The reason the newer diesels shouldn't idle is due to the new emissions they are installing. Idling is a rather inefficient process with diesels and creates a fair amount of soot and debris from unburnt fuel. The unburnt fuel will begin to plug your DPF filter and either your truck will go into regeneration to clean this filter or worse yet you may need to replace the filter. These filters do have a service life, a fairly long one, but idle time decreases their life.

Another down fall to idling for longer periods is that at an idle your fuel pressure isn't very high. Since the fuel pressure isn't very high the spray pattern from your injector isn't at its optimum patter and begins to flush the cylinder walls with diesel fuel. This can get fuel between the piston rings and the cylinder walls and can actually get into the oil.

As others said, typically by the time you reach the pump your temps have had enough time to settle themselves to where they need to be.

During the winter time, I will typically let mine idle quite a bit longer than normal to help keep fuel flowing and avoid the harder starting...

Idling typically will not hurt anything when done with in reason. Too much idling can cause harm.

as Narboza said, diesel doesn't emit the volatile vapors that gasoline does. Idling a diesel at a pump is not going to cause any harm, although some may argue this fact.
Got links to back this up? It's news to me.
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Old 04-25-2014, 01:41 AM   #15
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The only thing I know about is the DPF and newer diesels is that idling for hours on end without highway drive time is bad. If the truck idles a lot due to PTO or other needs and does not get driven on highway for 10-20 miles after a few hours of that they end up at the dealer for them to reset the regen cycle. Otherwise, if idling for more then a few minutes where an issue the F550 I drive and barely ever turn off in a 12 hour shift towing would not be in service. So no 10, 20, 30 minutes idling and then hitting the road will have no ill effect on the newer diesels, 3, 4, 8 hours without the proper ECU flash will end up with a trip to the dealer.
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Old 04-25-2014, 02:54 AM   #16
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I never shut off any of my vehicles when i fuel up. I have heard here & there that its not safe to leave the veh running, but I have yet to have someone explain to me a valid danger in leaving it running. the engine is in the front, exhaust is in the back. no flames/sparks shooting anywhere. the only real danger i have heard of is static electricity, and that has nothing to do with the engine running. you can get static electricity even when the engine is off. I know the fumes are more flammable than the fuel itself, but leaving the engine running does not increase the chances of vapors igniting. you have to have an ignitor, & the only ignitor at the fuel-fill door would be static electricity or a cigarette. Neither of those would be affected by leaving the engine running. & as far as the signage that says turn off engine, there are disclaimers all over this planet. I have not heard of a fire starting DUE TO LEAVING THE ENGINE RUNNING. I have heard of fires started from static but not from leaving the engine running. I have yet to hear a good reason to turn off my engine while i fuel. & I live in South Dakota where its quite often -30 with a 40mph wind while fueling. I'll leave my heater going instead! I would listen to any valid points tho.
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Old 04-25-2014, 06:24 AM   #17
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I drive mine like a gasser.
Remote start to start and warm up.
Shut it off when I would have shut off my gasser.
No worries so far.
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Old 04-25-2014, 07:01 AM   #18
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I own a fleet of tractor trailers. We never shut down during fueling. It's also good practice to let your engine have a cool down period for 10-15 minutes after parking. If your engine has a shut down timer, often it can be disabled by using the cruise control to increase the engine rpm's to around 900-1100 rpm's. Idling newer engine for 10-15 minutes at a time with the use of higher rpm's will not your engine at all. Diesel engines like to run and not be shut off and restarted constantly.
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Old 04-26-2014, 09:35 PM   #19
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You don't need to shut down to refuel with diesel. The diesel vapors will not ignite from a static spark like gasoline. Even if your next to a gasoline pump you don't need to shut down because you are not in direct contact with flowing gasoline. The vapors will not be concentrated enough by the time they get to your vehicle.

With gasoline the whole vehicle builds static. You should always touch a part of the vehicle that is not directly next to the nozzle to discharge all static. Getting back into your vehicle while fueling will recharge you with additional static. The vapors of gasoline coming out of your filling port have a low flashpoint and just touching the nozzle can make a spark strong enough to ignite the vapors. Usually there's enough air flow or you would see more gas stations on fire because nobody follows procedures to eliminate the risk.

Diesel vapors have a high flash point and the vapors will not ignite from a spark. Actually a low temp open flame will not ignite diesel fuel vapors.
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Old 04-29-2014, 11:23 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by silveradoduane View Post
I never shut off any of my vehicles when i fuel up. I have heard here & there that its not safe to leave the veh running, but I have yet to have someone explain to me a valid danger in leaving it running. the engine is in the front, exhaust is in the back. no flames/sparks shooting anywhere. the only real danger i have heard of is static electricity, and that has nothing to do with the engine running. you can get static electricity even when the engine is off. I know the fumes are more flammable than the fuel itself, but leaving the engine running does not increase the chances of vapors igniting. you have to have an ignitor, & the only ignitor at the fuel-fill door would be static electricity or a cigarette. Neither of those would be affected by leaving the engine running. & as far as the signage that says turn off engine, there are disclaimers all over this planet. I have not heard of a fire starting DUE TO LEAVING THE ENGINE RUNNING. I have heard of fires started from static but not from leaving the engine running. I have yet to hear a good reason to turn off my engine while i fuel. & I live in South Dakota where its quite often -30 with a 40mph wind while fueling. I'll leave my heater going instead! I would listen to any valid points tho.
Exactly. If it really was dangerous, I have a feeling the manufacturers would have rigged something up not allowing you to open the fuel door while the engine was running- you know, to "protect" the sheeple.
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