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Old 06-11-2013, 09:01 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Oaklevel View Post
I agree will all the above but also is the hitch set up correctly & is the trailer level (or close ) when it is hitched to the truck. I had a similar issue with my 22' box trailer but it was the hitch set up.

All my issues went away when I got a truck with training wheels

Good thought. The trailer was level and I'm pretty sure the hitch was set up correctly. I did change the WD around a little to see if it helped. I really need to get to a scale. I can't always tell how much tongue weight is on my the rear end squat because it self levels with the air support.

I'm thinking the tires are the culprit. I'm going to try pulling it with 41-44 PSI to see if that changes anything. If the results are not good I will try OldCoot's idea of the caster adjustment. If it really does come down to tires I might get different tires. Right now I'm wishing I didn't sell the Duramax. I have plenty of power, but not the weight capacity I'm used to.
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:14 PM   #22
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I had a similar issue where it would seem the rear of our Expedition would "squirm". Played with the hitch and air pressures - not much help. Upgraded to LT tires and made a noticeable difference. Wasnt a cheap upgrade but well worth it.
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:52 PM   #23
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I had a lot of chatter on some roads with the setup of the hitch as it came with my used trailer. Generally it was fine but on some roads it felt as though the trailer brakes were pulsing. I went to the website for the hitch and reviewed the directions super critically. I ended up making a small adjustment and the problem was mostly gone.
Re tongue weight: the problem was not noticed on the same road until the water tank (rear) was filled. The TV and RV were both loaded at that point and all points measured at equal height changes vs unloaded but there was no scale involved.
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Old 06-11-2013, 10:31 PM   #24
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I tow with an F-150 with P275-60-18s and I have a bit of the same problem. I run with my tires at max sidewall (44 psi) all the time. I will be buying new tires soon and will upgrade to LTs. I am sure everything else is set up correctly.
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Old 06-14-2013, 11:37 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by Big Bad Allis View Post
Good thought. The trailer was level and I'm pretty sure the hitch was set up correctly. I did change the WD around a little to see if it helped. I really need to get to a scale. I can't always tell how much tongue weight is on my the rear end squat because it self levels with the air support.

I'm thinking the tires are the culprit. I'm going to try pulling it with 41-44 PSI to see if that changes anything. If the results are not good I will try OldCoot's idea of the caster adjustment. If it really does come down to tires I might get different tires. Right now I'm wishing I didn't sell the Duramax. I have plenty of power, but not the weight capacity I'm used to.
I recall reading at one point that the Escalade and Denali had lower tow ratings b/c of the 20inch tire and wheel option. The tires where the primary culprit as they had lower load index's that 17 and 18 inch tires. I thought that had changed as more companies offered 20 inch options, but maybe not. According to Tire Rack those tires are load range 111S, which is 2409 pounds, but if you have to reduce that to 91% as stated above that gives you 2192, which max the rear axle at 4200 pounds. That is not so good.
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Old 06-15-2013, 12:15 AM   #26
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I think you're on to something with the Escalade and Denali models load capacity being lowered because of the tire size. I can't find an LT or anything with that tire size with a higher load ratings. I'm pretty sure the drifting that I'm feeling is because of the tires. I might buy a different set of rims and tires for when I'm pulling the trailer. I only be doing it about 5 times a year. It is t that big of a deals to swap them out.

Thanks all for the responses.

Jason
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Old 06-16-2013, 12:54 AM   #27
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OP - Tires may only be a portion of this issue -
Extra load tires are available in your size - such as: Continental*CrossContact LX

That is one seriously heavy trailer - if your SUV is the half ton version you may just be to far over the capabilities of the truck:
Truck = 2011 GMC YUKON, XL, and Denali - Tech Specs - Truck Trend
Trailer = Wildwood Travel Trailer by Forest River

I suggest that you scale your set up before spending money on what may be band-aid solutions that do not resolve your issue

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Old 06-16-2013, 08:01 AM   #28
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To add to all of the excellent suggestions already posted:

Check the spring bar to cam position....that has to be exact, and makes a big difference.

Confession: Because of receiver hitch replacement (questionable integrity after a rear end collision), I had to do a 1 notch head assembly adjustment forward to get my weight distributed correctly with the new setup. Didn't think much about the cam to spring bar position, but the combo did not handle very well on a short trip to the beach last week. Checking the cam position, the cams were riding slightly behind the notches. I did a 1/2 turn on the nuts at the campground, and the combo handled much better on the way back home. I will fine tune that puppy before the next trip.

Some wander can be expected....you have a heavy trailer hanging on the bumper......it will not drive the same as no trailer. Even though I have a 1/2 ton truck pulling a 28.5' trailer weighing 5500 lbs., I can feel the trailer back there pushing me around some. A Denali, with a shorter wheelbase and "cushier" springs pulling a longer, heavier trailer would tend to pushed around more than what I am experiencing.

I am also running the passenger tires that came on my truck, but will replace them with load range C LT tires when the current tires wear out.
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Old 06-16-2013, 09:07 AM   #29
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Would definitely run them up to max if not to 50# just to try it while towing, especially on the rear and at least 40 on the front for towing. I would let them back down to 35# when not towing as the ride will be horrible.
Crosswind can also cause wandering, however I believe improper tire inflation is your issue.

NOT knowing the truck's weight when towing could be very unsafe in your situation. Running under inflated tires (especially metric tires) in a "potentially" overloaded vehicle is a recipe for disaster.

Why the correct tire PSI may not be on the door or the max on the tire

A visit to a CAT scale.
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Old 06-16-2013, 04:17 PM   #30
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I'm no expert but if you have a lot of semi truck traffic where you are towing depressed wheel tracks give the feeling of wandering on the highway.
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