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Old 03-18-2013, 12:15 AM   #1
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Ecoboost HP vs. Torque (Moved from another thread)

The big thing with the Ecoboost towing is the torque in tow mod it pulls my trailer at 60mph in 6th gear@1800rpm it drops to 5th 2500rpm on small hills vary seldom 4th most v8s run much higher rpm on the same hills
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:34 AM   #2
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I have a brother in law who has a F450 and a very large 5er it is a great combination but it sites most of the time he doesn't need it for a dd. I know the Ecoboost isn't a big diesel F350 or 3500 but it pulls a larger tt very well and is a fantastic dd if you think you are going to go bigger in the near future get the bigger truck it probably won't be your dd
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:23 AM   #3
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You hit any big hills and I bet you will be in 3rd or 2nd to keep the HP in its peak 365@5000RPM unless the trailer weights nothing.
Have you driven an EcoBoost?
I'll take that bet.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:59 AM   #4
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Have you driven an EcoBoost?
I'll take that bet.
no I haven`t.. but i have towed with lots of different types of gas and diesels some with larger gears and more HP then a eco.. I would bet a few dollars that any large hills say 6% and you will be on the redline, because it take HP to keep the speed and the eco is making peak @5k not 2800, put on a load cell dyno and you will see, or try to climb 4-6% with a 7000# camper and maintain 65mph. I believe it is a great engine but it also has its limitations that is why Ford sells the SD with the diesel..
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:03 PM   #5
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I have pull steep hill 6% with my truck and trailer 4th gear and can easily do it I am a truck driver have pulled super b (30 wheels 138000 lbs) all over Canada 40% in British Columbia so I know what I am talking about the Ecoboost isn't a diesel but it is amazing
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:48 PM   #6
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I would bet a few dollars that any large hills say 6% and you will be on the redline, because it take HP to keep the speed
That's a common misconception. It is torque, not horsepower, that is important when pulling. My diesel doesn't have much for horsepower, but lots of torque.
So, look again at the chart on your post. See that torque curve?
And rather than speculate, listen to those who pull with an EcoBoost. Every one is more than happy. Nuff said.
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:34 PM   #7
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That's a common misconception. It is torque, not horsepower, that is important when pulling.
no it is not... as much as I want to believe, it is not TQ
TQ*RPM/5252=HP

Just look at the equation and work with it and you tell me which is more important.

TQ is twisting force but NO WORK IS BEING DONE. it gets you moving but that is it...

Once you incorporate the RPM component you are then doing work over a period of time.

You don't go faster from A to B with more twisting force. You go faster from A to B by doing MORE WORK.

Why do you think all ET calculators use HP as the primary variable to determine ET and MPH?

I though your way once but I was schooled and now I know otherwise..
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Old 03-18-2013, 03:19 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by jevanb View Post
no it is not... as much as I want to believe, it is not TQ
TQ*RPM/5252=HP

Just look at the equation and work with it and you tell me which is more important.

TQ is twisting force but NO WORK IS BEING DONE. it gets you moving but that is it...

Once you incorporate the RPM component you are then doing work over a period of time.

You don't go faster from A to B with more twisting force. You go faster from A to B by doing MORE WORK.

Why do you think all ET calculators use HP as the primary variable to determine ET and MPH?

I though your way once but I was schooled and now I know otherwise..
well sort of- but not exactly.

Maybe this will help.

To move XXXX lbs of weight (assuming static resistance) will take YYY horsepower at QQ speed.

Now think about the HP and TQ curve charts for every engine you have ever seen. they are obviously not constant.

So you need not only a specific amount of HP at a specific speed, but a specific engine RPM to develop that specific HP to maintain that specific speed.

TQ is better expressed in the engines ability to get (quickly) to that specific RPM. In any situation, the more TQ you have, the more quickly you can get to the needed engine RPM to develop the needed HP.

In the real world, the amount of HP will vary greatly from second to second as a factor of resistance. The amount of engine torque determines how quickly your engine can get to the specific level of RPM needed for that momentary instance. As it is constantly changing, the quicker the engine can change to accommodate that load, the more responsive it feels.

That is torque, not hp.

Truth is, you can move huge amounts of weight with very little hp, but as the resistance builds the amount of hp changes very quickly. in order to bring that hp online that quickly, you need an awful lot of torque.
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Old 03-18-2013, 05:07 PM   #9
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no it is not... as much as I want to believe, it is not TQ
TQ*RPM/5252=HP


I though your way once but I was schooled and now I know otherwise..
If it is a simple linear relationship, how come the torque and HP curves are not related in a linear fashion?
As for the EcoBoost, since it develops maximum torque at 3000 rpm, increasing the rpm does not increase the pulling power. And that is why it doesn't have to downshift and rev the snot out of the engine, as will other gas engines with a torque curve that does not rise as quickly.
Oh and by the way, please refrain from making inflamatory comments. Thanks a bunch.
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Old 03-18-2013, 06:38 PM   #10
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Try this, it helps explain it in simple terms.

Torque potential is translated to real-world applications through the vehicle's transmission and axles, specifically the axle differentials. The way these units are geared determines how the horsepower is translated to torque.
To understand this, think of the difference between and race car and a tractor. The race car develops an enormous amount of horsepower, but the torque is used for speed through gearing. There's not a lot of work needed, in a relative sense, to push a race car forward, so less work is accomplished, leaving more power for speed.
A tractor, on the other hand, may have the same size engine producing the same amount of horsepower. That horsepower is harnessed for doing work through gearing. The tractor can't reach high speeds, but it can pull and push huge amounts of weight.
Next time you see a vehicle advertised on television, think about what it means when they talk about horsepower and torque. There's a relationship between the two -- they can't exist without each other, but they stand for very different aspects of making a car or truck work.
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