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Old 04-15-2015, 08:59 AM   #11
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Neither you nor your truck will ever know the difference in 150lbs. Your rear axle bearings might fail at 424,900 miles instead of 425,000.
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Old 04-15-2015, 09:03 AM   #12
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My current WDH setup with a 720 lb. tongue weight, I am transferring 180 lbs. back to my trailer axles, while adding 360 lbs. to my front axle (60 lbs. over the unhitched weight), and taking off while subtracting 560 lbs. from my rear axle (500 lbs. over unhitched weight).

Running those figures, 25% percent of the trailer tongue weight is going back to the trailer axles.

If you run more figures, that 720 lbs of tongue weight minus the 180 lbs. going back to the trailer axles equal 540 lbs now being carried by the truck. 60 extra lbs. on the front axle and 500 lbs. on the rear axle account for that extra weight (with a 20 lb. discrepancy due to the 20 lb. increments of CAT scales).

For those that want something to put you to sleep late at nite, here is a thread I started with my weights on a previous WDH setup (same truck and trailer, but different WDH setup): Weight Stats

Kudos for the OP being concerned about his weights !!
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Old 04-15-2015, 10:08 AM   #13
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It's correct that some weight is transferred to the trailer axle. However, that is not license to consider the TW lower than when free-standing. Tongue weight is tongue weight. You do not consider your 900 lbs of TW reduced to 600 when you engage WDH.

But regarding the same layout being renamed to a different model. If it's the same model, you should ask why the TW has increased so dramatically. It's possible that the storage compartments used to be up front and are now in the rear. If that's true then the 12.7% dry TW might not changes as drastically because the rear-stored items would offset the battery and LP. If the water heater and/or fresh water tak were moved from front to rear, that would also have a small effect.

12.7% TW in the dry condition is very high. I suspect that is by design, and it won't be as bad as you think.
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Old 04-15-2015, 10:37 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by thebrakeman View Post
It's correct that some weight is transferred to the trailer axle. However, that is not license to consider the TW lower than when free-standing. Tongue weight is tongue weight. You do not consider your 900 lbs of TW reduced to 600 when you engage WDH.
Your "TW" number won't change. But if you calculate it as though all of the TW is going to be riding on the TV, you are wrong. Unless you aren't using a WDH.
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Old 04-15-2015, 10:52 AM   #15
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Ok..im going to step out and try some logic here. Whatever weight comes off the ball is going to the front end and the trailer. It would seem that the ratio of the distances from the rear end to the front and the rear end to the trailer axles would be the proportionate amount of weight distribution. So roughly speaking here, if the distance of the rear axle to the center point of the trailer axles is twice the wheel base of the tow vehicle then 1/3 goes back. Purely speculation here, but that may be the dealers logic and it makes sense to me.
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Old 04-15-2015, 11:03 AM   #16
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Many thanks for all of your inputs.

I know longer need to be living on the edge nor think I am smarter than the experts that make these ratings. I'll need to mull this information over for awhile and recheck my own scale figures from last season with my current rig.

I hadn't planned on RV'ing when I bought my truck so I have what I have - minumum payload capacity for an F150 (standard tow package, Goodyear Rangler tires instead of LT's, 3.31 RR axel). Next time I'll be smarter. Did luck out though - got the Ecoboost engine which does the job.
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Old 04-15-2015, 12:48 PM   #17
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The folks who commented that some of the weight transfers to the trailer axles are indeed correct. You are basically putting a stiff spring between the trailer and TV which both transfers weight to the TV front axle and to the trailer. It can't push down on the truck without also pushing down on the trailer - simple physics.

I tow a much larger trailer Windjammer 3008W, and before that a Prowler 280FKS, with an Equalizer 10000 pound hitch and it works fine. I don't think you'll have a problem.
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Old 04-15-2015, 01:25 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dustman_stx View Post
Your "TW" number won't change. But if you calculate it as though all of the TW is going to be riding on the TV, you are wrong. Unless you aren't using a WDH.
I think we are saying the same thing. Yes, a WDH's job is to transfer all lost front axle weight back onto the front axle. And in the process some weight is also transferred to the trailer axle(s).

I'm simply trying to be sure that someone (random example) with 500/750 (WC/WD) receiver rating does not tow a 900 lb TW trailer, and say they are OK because the WDH calculations say TW was effectively reduced to under 750lbs. In my example, the 750 lbs TW limit references the unhitched trailer's TW.
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Old 04-15-2015, 01:27 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crockett View Post
Ok..im going to step out and try some logic here. Whatever weight comes off the ball is going to the front end and the trailer. It would seem that the ratio of the distances from the rear end to the front and the rear end to the trailer axles would be the proportionate amount of weight distribution. So roughly speaking here, if the distance of the rear axle to the center point of the trailer axles is twice the wheel base of the tow vehicle then 1/3 goes back. Purely speculation here, but that may be the dealers logic and it makes sense to me.
Yes, that's the general idea.
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Old 04-15-2015, 01:36 PM   #20
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I like to think of it this way:
Say you had your trailer hitched without the WDH engaged. WD bars are secured in the head, but not engaged. Now have 2 gorillas, and each one grabbed a WDH bar and lifted, still holding the end of each bar.

At this point, a large torque has been applied to the hitch head, which lifts the coupler, removes a lot of weight from the rear axle, and adds a little bit of weight to the front axle. The difference between these 2 weights is being supported by the gorillas, so all forces balance out. Note that no additional weight has been added or removed from the trailer (yet).

Now have the apes place the ends of the bars on the Equal-I-zer L-brackets (or the snap-up brackets, etc) and let go. The force that they were supporting is now supported by the A-frame. Some of that weight gets transferred to the trailer axles. The remaining weight actually goes into the ball, and that's where the math would get really difficult, since it cycles back thru the system.
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