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Old 10-11-2018, 03:45 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by bikendan View Post
The driver's weight is NOT a part of the Payload Capacity equation, it's a part of the Towing Capacity equation.

Payload Capacity considers the driver as one of the Occupants. It only exempts the weight of the full fuel tank.
Towing Capacity exempts the weight of the full tank AND a 150lb driver.
That's why the payload sticker says "Occupants and cargo should not exceed xxxxlbs".
rlh, you need to focus about the trailer's pin weight. The trailer's weight is secondary to that.
You'll always run out of payload capacity WAY before getting close to towing capacity.

By the way, we also found a Open Range that's perfect for us, if we ever decide to go bigger.
As an example for us when we looked at 5th wheels that our 2006 Ram 2500 with the 5.9L diesel could handle, we looked at the following:

Rockwood 8280WS PIN weight (we rounded up to 1,400LBS)
Fully Loaded (we rounded up to 10,000LBS)
based on the manufacture's provided information
Ram 2500 Towing capacity 12,900
Load capacity 2,495 (we rounded down for safety to 2,400)

As you see, deducting the pin from the load gave us 1,000 LBS. If you deduct the weight of the 5th wheel hitch, another 100 LBS, we have 900 to spare.

And with a fully loaded trailer, we have 2,900 LBS of wiggle room.

It is our opinion that it is best to have some wiggle room then to run up to and over the capacities of the TV.
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Old 10-11-2018, 09:10 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by duby325 View Post

As you see, deducting the pin from the load gave us 1,000 LBS. If you deduct the weight of the 5th wheel hitch, another 100 LBS...
Unless you have an Anderson hitch, most of the 5th-wheel hitches that I know of are closer to 300 pounds.
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Old 10-11-2018, 09:58 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by JohnD10 View Post
Unless you have an Anderson hitch, most of the 5th-wheel hitches that I know of are closer to 300 pounds.
Don't know what fifth wheel hitches you are looking at, but most standard fiver hitches are right at 100#. My old 15k is even less.

https://www.towuniverse.com/Reese-16...kaAiMzEALw_wcB


Now if you are talking auto slider hitches, yep,some of those are pretty heavy.
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Old 10-11-2018, 10:24 AM   #34
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Base F250 vs base F350 will show some differences between springs, shocks, and axles. When people add towing packages and the camper and/or snow plow options to the F250, these difference nearly evaporate. Spring rates, helper springs, and blocks all become identical when the F250 is set up to tow. Some disagreement about whether the F250 has one fewer leaf in the rear.

Years ago, there may have been some frame differences. That is no longer the case.

F250s that are set up to tow and have camper/snow option will be almost indistinguishable from an F350 ... and end up only about $700 cheaper.

With gas engines, I think the F250 has a slightly different transmission (6R100 vs 6R140). With diesel, both get the 6R140.

A large part of the difference is just the sticker -- F250s are de-rated. Not terribly dissimilar to the various de-ratings you can get on the F350 and other 1-tons. There are some cases where it makes sense for a buyer to want a 1-ton rated to 10,000, 11,400, or full 11,500 GVWR ratings. Same truck in those cases with different stickers.

For truck-specific questions like this, I highly recommend going to one of myriad Ford forums. Likewise, if people in the Ford Truck forum started asking a bunch of Forest River questions, I'd probably point them over here.
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Old 10-11-2018, 10:25 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by NMWildcat View Post
Don't know what fifth wheel hitches you are looking at, but most standard fiver hitches are right at 100#. My old 15k is even less.

https://www.towuniverse.com/Reese-16...kaAiMzEALw_wcB


Now if you are talking auto slider hitches, yep,some of those are pretty heavy.
My Reese 16K slider, according to their website, weighs 281 pounds.

Add the mounting rails and other hardware...
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Old 10-11-2018, 10:30 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnD10 View Post
My Reese 16K slider, according to their website, weighs 281 pounds.

Add the mounting rails and other hardware...
So by saying 'most' fifth wheel hitches you know of are 300#, you are talking about yours......

I can say most seasoned fifth wheel pullers I know dont use sliders, they use standard fifth wheel hitches. 100#.

But this is like all these weight discussions with all the calculations using numbers that are really a compromise between engineers, lawyers, and marketing. It's a swag. If we all followed all the weight 'rules', especially the silly CC weight, we would all be pulling popups with semi tractors
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Old 10-11-2018, 01:01 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by JohnD10 View Post
Unless you have an Anderson hitch, most of the 5th-wheel hitches that I know of are closer to 300 pounds.
We have the Reese Pro series 16K mounted. I've been looking for the specs online as our RV dealership installed it, to see what the total weight is. All I can say anecdotally, based on my observation being 59 year old, out of shape guy, it does not seem to be much over 100 LBS if I am able to remove it myself. As it is mounted in my truck, there are 4 pins holding it place to the bed. I am able to remove these pins to remove the full assembly to provide space in the bed if needed.

Mind you, it is much easier to have another party help me remove the hitch.
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Old 10-11-2018, 03:33 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duby325 View Post
As an example for us when we looked at 5th wheels that our 2006 Ram 2500 with the 5.9L diesel could handle, we looked at the following:

Rockwood 8280WS PIN weight (we rounded up to 1,400LBS)
Fully Loaded (we rounded up to 10,000LBS)
based on the manufacture's provided information
Ram 2500 Towing capacity 12,900
Load capacity 2,495 (we rounded down for safety to 2,400)

As you see, deducting the pin from the load gave us 1,000 LBS. If you deduct the weight of the 5th wheel hitch, another 100 LBS, we have 900 to spare.

And with a fully loaded trailer, we have 2,900 LBS of wiggle room.

It is our opinion that it is best to have some wiggle room then to run up to and over the capacities of the TV.
Maybe Im confused, but if the 5er estimated weight is 10,000 LBS, then the pin weight, loaded will probably be closer to 2000 lbs.


Add the 5er hitch, and passenger weight, and you'll probably be above cargo capacity.


You can't take dry pin weight and assume no change for a fully loaded trailer.


Maybe Im not reading what you're saying right.


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Old 10-11-2018, 06:11 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by JohnD10 View Post
Unless you have an Anderson hitch, most of the 5th-wheel hitches that I know of are closer to 300 pounds.
My B&W Patriot 16K rail version is 147 lbs.
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Old 10-16-2018, 07:59 AM   #40
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I have a 2016 F-250 SD XLT with the 6.7L Diesel pulling a Forest River Wolfpack 325 Pack13 5th Wheel and used this document for my tow rating info. Hope this helps.

https://www.fleet.ford.com/resources...2016_LoRes.pdf
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