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Old 09-02-2015, 02:11 PM   #11
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if you are driving P rated tires on the tow vehicle, then try pumping up to 42# rear and 38# front and see if that helps... next tire buy if it is soon, look into LT rated tires which have thicker and stiffer sidewalls and will not give that soft feel...
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Old 09-02-2015, 02:25 PM   #12
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Lt tires don't exist for a santa fe, we are talking mid sized SUV not a truck. I would go with the WDH or first try moving your weight around. it sounds like you tried to move the weight away from the hitch and this , too lite a tongue, can cause the trailer to bounce more than it should.
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Old 09-02-2015, 04:58 PM   #13
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We just returned from a 4,000 km trip down east including the "mountains" of Vermont. I am towing a 2008 Palomino Stampede S17 (3100 lbs with my gear and running empty tanks) with a 2014 V6 Dodge Grand Caravan. My TV weight limit is 3,600 lbs, similar to your Santa Fe. I installed a weight distributing hitch and inflated all tires on the trailer and TV to the max. The trailer and TV worked well together and we were comfortable the whole trip with max. speed of 100 km/hr (62 mph). We did not use 6th gear on the automatic, and once and a while manually downshifted going up steep hills if the transmission started to search. I agree with those who suggest a WDH, and with taking some weight from the "ends" and putting it closer to the hitch. If I take up too many links on my WDH chains it moves too much weight to the front of the TV.. and a "floaty" feeling results.
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Old 09-02-2015, 05:28 PM   #14
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I tow an a-frame (2014 Rockwood A122) with a 2008 Hyundai Entourage (their re-badged Kia minivan). 3.5L, 250 HP V-6 with 5 speed tranny, front wheel drive. Rated tow is 3500lbs, no other numbers available (Europe tow capacity is much greater).

When test driving at delivery, there was porpoising of both minivan and camper even at 20-30 MPH. I went back, dealer suggested an E2 Equalizer WDH/anti-sway. He installed for $320. Difference was night and day. Minivan was back to normal smooth ride. No sway or tow problems up to 75 MPH on interstate in crosswinds.

Have since towed from Colorado Springs to Lincoln, NE (540 miles each way) on I-80 in 30+ MPH crosswinds at 65, and through the Rockies to Montrose and Ridgway, CO (6 hours each way). I will never tow with a soft suspension vehicle without WDH/anti-sway again.

I learned what white-knuckle towing was with a 1993 Ford Explorer and 2000 Coleman 12ft box PUP - no WDH or anti-sway. That rig would sway at 62 MPH and up.

My actual tow weight with the A122 is 2720 lbs, add 150 lbs for full water tank - limited storage space helps with holding weight down, and we do pack light. We add 200 lbs of stuff to minivan (food and drink for weekend, clothes, EZ-up, 2 folding chairs, and entrance carpet).

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Old 09-02-2015, 07:21 PM   #15
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I had that floaty feeling when I had too much weight on the rear without a WDH. The front wheels don't have enough weight on them to produce proper steering and control.

Get a WDH if your vehicle will allow it.
Get 12% of the trailer weight on the tongue, then set the WDH to properly throw enough weight forward to the front axel.

Or tie some anvils to the front bumper. (J/K)
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Old 09-02-2015, 07:39 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Movin up View Post
Towing rockwood a frame s122 with a hyundai santa fe. Tow rating is 3500, so should be adequate. We have all we can tow get weight as far back in trailer and as far front in santa fe as possible, but still get a "floatie" feeling. Thinking of getting a truck. Should we be looking at towing capacity of truck, or something to do with tongue weight capabilities. Can you get too big a tow vehicle for such a small trailer?
If I read this correctly, you are loading your stuff as far back in the trailer as possible; I assume to lessen the rear squat on the Sante Fe. This is the wrong approach. Your floatie feel could be because with this method your tongue weight ratio is too low (less than 10%). So, load the trailer so at least 10% is on the tongue, don't even load the Sante Fe oddly. Get a WDH with a sway system and problems over. WW
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Old 09-02-2015, 07:50 PM   #17
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I towed a 3500 lb boat trailer with a 2.7L Santa Fe 4X4. As long as you have a trailer tail high and not exceed towable weight, you should be OK. The Santa Fe does not like a tail heavy trailer. WDH is good, but if you are under 3500, it should do well. Check tire pressures and lean toward max. This is just my humble experience, but experience none the less.
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Old 09-03-2015, 08:58 AM   #18
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Bouncy like that is normal with coil springs. I'm unfamiliar if the Santa Fe has coils or leafs under the back. Coils are used for a more luxury feel when driving unloaded.


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Old 09-03-2015, 09:54 AM   #19
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I guess the first thing to ask the OP was to describe the term "floatie". Where one thinks that means bounce, another sway, and another a light front end of the S-Fe. The light front end was what I was going for, especially since the OP loads the trailer tail heavy, that is begging for disaster; steering would be scary! Too little tongue weight and without WDH or sway control????

I also deduced the reason he loads heavier in the rear of the trailer (as well as front heavy in the SF) was to lessen rear end sag.

So, what is "floatie feel"?

The SF is going to be more prone to sway that a truck due to its spring, tires, etc., but if set up correctly (and driving a reasonable speed) 3500# shouldn't be a problem.

Besides knowing definitions, pictures are worth thousands of words!
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