Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-11-2017, 11:46 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 9
Need help with numbers

Hello everyone, I am new to towing anything really and to owning a travel trailer. I am trying to make sense of all the numbers and wondering with someone can help me out a little bit.

I currently own a 2016 tundra crewman, 4x4 with a tow package and a 2018 windjammer 3029w; the listed hitch weight is 1067 lbs and a dry weight of 7772 lbs. I am now a full timer and am parked pretty much in one spot with the occasional rv park moves. I’ve tried looking at towing numbers and figuring things out but alas. I’m pretty sure I might be very close or over what the tundra can do. Because of this, I am thinking of upgrading to a Ford F-250 xlt (gas), crew cab 4x4 with the camper package, would I be better off with this vehicle with decent room to spare for weight? There are so many towing numbers I’m not sure what to look at exactly.

Sorry so long
__________________

__________________
methos987 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2017, 01:56 AM   #2
Moderators' Assistant
 
bikendan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Camano Island, Washington
Posts: 13,289
You need to post the Tundra's axle weight capacities and payload capacity from the driver's door.
Also, do you know what the rear end ratio is?

You should be better off with the F250 though.
__________________

__________________
Dan-Retired Firefighter/EMT
Shawn-Musician/Entrepreneur/Wine Expert
and Zoe the Wonder Dog(R.I.P.)
2016 PrimeTime TracerAIR 255, pushing a 2014 Ford F150 4x4 3.5 Ecoboost w/Max Tow Package
Equalizer WDH and Prodigy BC
bikendan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2017, 02:22 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Quincy, WA
Posts: 90
Your hitch weight is the weight at the hitch point.
You dry weight is the weight of the trailer empty. Add to that 8lbs per gallon of water that you have on board + your cargo (clothes, groceries, anything you have added)
Your Tundra is probably a 1/2 ton pickup. ( I am not familiar with the Toyota trucks much) If so, it is a 1000 lb. cargo capacity. Passengers and stuff included.
On the door label there should be a GCWR rating. This would be the combined weight that the truck is rated for. GCWR - truck weight = tow capability.
I do suspect you are over on the Tundra. A F250 or other 3/4 ton truck would be better. A 1 ton would be great.
Towing is just part of the equation. The stopping is in my opinion of higher importance. Long story but out west we have some very steep hills. I have had an experience where it was a "white knuckler" coming down a mountain pass with trailer brakes going out.
I would say a truck that can pull the trailer reasonably but is able to bring the combination to a stop on a steep hill is the best setup.


Take your time learning your setup and have fun camping
__________________
KRedburn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2017, 12:38 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by KRedburn View Post
Your hitch weight is the weight at the hitch point.
You dry weight is the weight of the trailer empty. Add to that 8lbs per gallon of water that you have on board + your cargo (clothes, groceries, anything you have added)
Your Tundra is probably a 1/2 ton pickup. ( I am not familiar with the Toyota trucks much) If so, it is a 1000 lb. cargo capacity. Passengers and stuff included.
On the door label there should be a GCWR rating. This would be the combined weight that the truck is rated for. GCWR - truck weight = tow capability.
I do suspect you are over on the Tundra. A F250 or other 3/4 ton truck would be better. A 1 ton would be great.
Towing is just part of the equation. The stopping is in my opinion of higher importance. Long story but out west we have some very steep hills. I have had an experience where it was a "white knuckler" coming down a mountain pass with trailer brakes going out.
I would say a truck that can pull the trailer reasonably but is able to bring the combination to a stop on a steep hill is the best setup.


Take your time learning your setup and have fun camping


Not necessarily true that a 1/2 ton has a 1,000 pound capacity...historically, yes, but itís a marketing ploy more than anything nowadays. I used to sell Tundras, so I can say they are very capable trucks, but I donít recall the numbers. Everyone is right on the way to figure it out and I agree with being able to stop is the most important. Personally, Iíd put a Tundra against a F-250 any day...
__________________
boxman117 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2017, 12:47 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Ejs4029's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Denver, NC
Posts: 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxman117 View Post
Not necessarily true that a 1/2 ton has a 1,000 pound capacity...historically, yes, but it’s a marketing ploy more than anything nowadays. I used to sell Tundras, so I can say they are very capable trucks, but I don’t recall the numbers. Everyone is right on the way to figure it out and I agree with being able to stop is the most important. Personally, I’d put a Tundra against a F-250 any day...

So you're saying you would choose a 1/2 ton Tundra over a 3/4 ton Ford F250 for towing the OP Windjammer ? So this is something you would have told a potential customer when you were selling Tundra's ? What is you're rationality based on ?
__________________
2015 Dodge Ram 2500 CTD,CC,SB,4x4

2016 Rockwood 2703 Emerald Edition
Ejs4029 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2017, 12:49 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ejs4029 View Post
So you're saying you would choose a 1/2 ton Tundra over a 3/4 ton Ford F250 for towing the OP Windjammer ? And this is based on ?


Not what I was saying at all...just that I donít know the tonnage on the Tundra and that the tonnage doesnít necessarily relate to literal tonnage in todayís trucks. It does relate to towing expectations based on the build of the truck though.
__________________
boxman117 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2017, 01:13 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Quincy, WA
Posts: 90
not to be picky but the example was a 1/2 ton truck which would be a F100. Most of today's trucks are "heavy half ton" ie F150 which would be rated 1500 lb. cargo
So, truck is rated 1500 lb cargo which would all stuff and tongue weight over the axles. Tow weight with equalizing hitch is altogether different and that is why there is a GCWR rating on the vehicle. That GCWR is where I am referring to that OP may be over the vehicles ratiings.
An F250 will have a higher GCWR than any heavy half ton pickup. A F350 1 ton will have higher GCWR than the F250 etc.

the Tundra is a nice truck as is an F150. But a V8 powered F250 will have better driveability with a 8000 lb trailer.


Just my honest opinion.


I used a F60 Freightliner to pull my 16500 lb fifth wheel dry weight after having a very scary issue on HWY 12 in WA. Long windy 6% down grade and have trailer brakes go out using a F350. Went and got the hauler after that.
__________________
KRedburn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2017, 06:01 PM   #8
Sham183
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 261
Some simple questions for you.

What is the weight of your tundra? Have you taken it to the scale?

What is the weight of the TT loaded like you were going camping?

What is your combined weight of both together hooked up?

Then from that what is the max payload of the tundra and the max combined towing capacity of the tundra?

Without the basic numbers you have nothing to go on. We can throw imaginary numbers all day and confuse you. So get some weights and letís see what you have and then letís talk about the TV and what might be the bast answer for you.

Tim
__________________
mopwr4me2003 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2017, 07:06 PM   #9
Member
 
Fishtexx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 36
My 2008 Tundra 5.7 4x4 door sticker
GVWR - 7100
F GAWR - 4000 at 30 psi
R GAWR - 4150 at 33 psi

That is with the factory tires. OP's numbers should be close.
__________________
Terry and Laurie
2017 Flagstaff 27RLWS
2008 Tundra 5.7 4x4
Fishtexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2017, 07:43 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 6,739
There's no way I'd tow a Windjammer 3029w with a 1/2 ton. I found the following on one website:

GVWR: 9,267
Dry Weight: 7,772
Hitch Weight: 1,067

Dry weight is for suckers - ignore it. It's what the TT weighs with no options and never really weighed that weight. Also, the hitch weight is based on dry weight, so it's also a poor number.

So the first thing is to assume your Tundra's towing capacity should be at least the GVWR or 9267 lbs.

Unless you can actually weigh it, assume the tongue weight is 12-15% of the GVWR. Let's use 12%, that means the TW could be 1112 lbs (maybe more). If you have a weight distribution hitch (WDH), and with this rig you SHOULD have one, add another 75-100 lbs depending on brand. Let's say 75 lb, so now your tongue weight (i.e., hitch weight) is 1112 + 75 = 1187 lbs. (You should make sure your hitch is rated for at least 1187 lbs hitch weight.)

Now look on the door frame of your Tundra. There will be a tire pressure sticker that will also say something like "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed xxx kg or yyy lbs." This number, whatever it is, is your Payload capacity.

Take your payload capacity and subtract the 1187 lbs tongue weight we calculated above. What's left has to cover you, your wife, your kids, your dogs, and anything else you put in the truck.

And most (many?) people like to have 20% margin to towing capacity and payload capacity.

I agree - get a 3/4 ton.
__________________

__________________
1988 Coleman Sequoia - popup (1987-2009) - outlasted 3 Dodge Grand Caravans!
2012 Roo19 - hybrid (2012-2015)

2016 Mini Lite 2503S - tt (2015 - ???)
2011 Traverse LT, 3.6L, FWD
2009 Silverado 1500 Ext Cab, 5.3L, 4x4, 3.73
2016 Silverado 2500HD Dbl Cab, 6.0L 4x4, 4.10
rockfordroo is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:22 PM.