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Old 06-16-2019, 05:03 AM   #1
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New - soon to be TT owner

I'm looking into TT's for the first time in my life, and for the last few weeks have been doing a ton of research online, and at a couple of the local RV centers. The one I like the best so far is the Rockwood 2508, but my TV will be a 2013 Dodge Durango 5.7l Hemi. I've read numerous posts on here with people asking if it's a good tow vehicle and seems to be ok if the numbers are right. All looks good to me with the exception of the wheelbase. If not that, then the 2306 will be another good option for me.

I was hoping to get some insight from anyone who's willing to share some knowledge with me. I will be getting the best sway hitch I can (there's probably a better way to say that) and a good brake controller. I'll have my two teenage kids with us, and I always err on the side of caution.

Specs:
Towing capacity: 7200lbs
After Cargo including gas: 6205.5 (estimate)
TT GVWR 5960
Leaving me 265.5 lbs to spare. If I drive it around dry, I have 1741lbs to spare... I dont expect to fill it up before camping, but again, I dont have real world experience to base that on.

This doesn't seem like much, but maybe it's ok?

Also the wheelbase of my vehicle is 120"
Trailer is 24' x 5 = 129.5

So I'm 9.5 inches under... is that a big deal in your opinion? I've read posts of people towing 32' TT's with the Durango ... but that doesn't sound safe. Or maybe I'm just overly cautious?

Any advice/tips will be greatly appreciated!
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Old 06-16-2019, 05:27 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by thoffland View Post
I'm looking into TT's for the first time in my life, and for the last few weeks have been doing a ton of research online, and at a couple of the local RV centers. The one I like the best so far is the Rockwood 2508, but my TV will be a 2013 Dodge Durango 5.7l Hemi. I've read numerous posts on here with people asking if it's a good tow vehicle and seems to be ok if the numbers are right. All looks good to me with the exception of the wheelbase. If not that, then the 2306 will be another good option for me.

I was hoping to get some insight from anyone who's willing to share some knowledge with me. I will be getting the best sway hitch I can (there's probably a better way to say that) and a good brake controller. I'll have my two teenage kids with us, and I always err on the side of caution.

Specs:
Towing capacity: 7200lbs
After Cargo including gas: 6205.5 (estimate)
TT GVWR 5960
Leaving me 265.5 lbs to spare. If I drive it around dry, I have 1741lbs to spare... I dont expect to fill it up before camping, but again, I dont have real world experience to base that on.

This doesn't seem like much, but maybe it's ok?

Also the wheelbase of my vehicle is 120"
Trailer is 24' x 5 = 129.5

So I'm 9.5 inches under... is that a big deal in your opinion? I've read posts of people towing 32' TT's with the Durango ... but that doesn't sound safe. Or maybe I'm just overly cautious?

Any advice/tips will be greatly appreciated!
what's the payload capacity on the driver's door yellow sticker? it say something like "Occupants and cargo should not exceed xxxxlbs". that's more important than towing capacity, especially on a SUV. the 2508 has a fantasy "dry" tongue weight of 660lbs. actual loaded tongue weight could be over 750lbs.

most tow vehicles will run out of payload, before reaching max tow capacity.
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Old 06-16-2019, 07:52 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by bikendan View Post
what's the payload capacity on the driver's door yellow sticker? it say something like "Occupants and cargo should not exceed xxxxlbs". that's more important than towing capacity, especially on a SUV. the 2508 has a fantasy "dry" tongue weight of 660lbs. actual loaded tongue weight could be over 750lbs.

most tow vehicles will run out of payload, before reaching max tow capacity.
Bikendan is right. TV capacity is important too. 4 people, two dogs and tounge weight eat up nearly all of my TV carrying capacity. It should look similar to this.Click image for larger version

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Old 06-16-2019, 07:55 AM   #4
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This might be a better representation. This is why the call it a yellow sticker.
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Old 06-16-2019, 09:57 AM   #5
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New - soon to be TT owner

Just from my own experience and many may agree on this but things add up fast when it comes to weight. The posted weight on the TT are not always accurate. When you start putting things in for supplies and stuff you always have more weight added than what you thought. Just be mindful of all your weights like payload, tongue weight, TV, TT, and combined weights. They all come into play sooner or later. Not saying you canít tow it but just be mindful of it.

On another note with that big of a TT you will feel every push and pull from passing cars, trucks and wind. Just a little white knuckle feeling at times. As long as your set up good you should be ok. You wonít win any races except to the gas station but thatís camping with a TT . Happy camping!
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Old 06-16-2019, 11:40 AM   #6
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You state that you are basing your calculations on TT GVWR - a good way of doing it. Seems few people actually exceed that number. So, you are probably good there.
As noted your issue may be truck payload. If you use 15% of the TT GVWR as a tongue weight guide, that will keep you on the safe side.
I tow my rig which has a stated 29'11 length with my F150 that has a 145" WB. Trailer weighs in at ~7k lbs. I'm using a Propride hitch, pricey - but keeps the trailer under control. Haven't had any "white knuckle" issue with 24k miles of towing using this setup. I find the hitch easy to use, no WD bars to store, and the length it adds allows me to open my tailgate while hitched up. Overall, I'm very happy with the hitch.


Good luck with your decision.
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Old 06-16-2019, 12:41 PM   #7
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assuming your payload capacity checks out... ( I find between 1500-1650# doing search, but each vehicle is unique)... mind you that payload includes all occupant weights, cargo and tongue weight ( probably around 800# for TW alone on the 2508, not the published 660#)... it looks like you will be mighty close to your safe limit there.

Also, seeing as the Durango is an SUV, it may have P-rated tires on it. P-rated tires will be a detriment when it comes to TT sway as the sidewalls will squirm under the weight of towing. An upgrade to LT-rated tires on the Durango will help combat TT sway as much as any WDH will. I towed with a Dodge van for years, and found that an upgrade to LT load range E tires helped the tow experience greatly.

Also consider the country you will be towing in... mountains are more of a challenge than flat-lands.
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Old 06-16-2019, 01:19 PM   #8
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Just a few random points.

WD hitches tend to weigh about 100 lbs themselves. Propride is generally considered to be the top-of-the-line ultimate best. Andersen is the lightest.

Payload & RAWR (rear axle weight rating) are your two main limiting factors. The closer you get to your payload max the more likely you are to exceed the RAWR.

When shopping for trailers, use 15% of the TT's GVWR (there is usually a sticker near the door or in the frame) to calculate the worst case tongue weight.

Personally, I want to be well under all the limits - less stress on the vehicle and more safety margin when things get sideways.

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Old 06-16-2019, 01:27 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by bikendan View Post
what's the payload capacity on the driver's door yellow sticker? it say something like "Occupants and cargo should not exceed xxxxlbs". that's more important than towing capacity, especially on a SUV. the 2508 has a fantasy "dry" tongue weight of 660lbs. actual loaded tongue weight could be over 750lbs.

most tow vehicles will run out of payload, before reaching max tow capacity.
Thanks Bikendan, just checked and 1200lbs is my max. I'd figured 860lbs cargo including my dog. With the hitch weight of 660lbs that puts me at 326lbs over the limit.

From another thread, I found the Coachmen Apex Nano 208BHS which is lighter, and has a hitch weight of 516, but with my current estimates, I'm still over by 182.50lbs

I'm in Phoenix, AZ and driving up to the Mogollon Rim/Flagstaff/Sedona... I don't want to struggle getting up those hills too much and cause too much wear on the truck.

Thanks for the guidance, I didn't think to figure out the cargo weight of the truck, it's something that's never been a concern before. Time to do more shopping!
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Old 06-16-2019, 01:31 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by mopwr4me2003 View Post
Just from my own experience and many may agree on this but things add up fast when it comes to weight. The posted weight on the TT are not always accurate. When you start putting things in for supplies and stuff you always have more weight added than what you thought. Just be mindful of all your weights like payload, tongue weight, TV, TT, and combined weights. They all come into play sooner or later. Not saying you canít tow it but just be mindful of it.

On another note with that big of a TT you will feel every push and pull from passing cars, trucks and wind. Just a little white knuckle feeling at times. As long as your set up good you should be ok. You wonít win any races except to the gas station but thatís camping with a TT . Happy camping!
Thanks! It looks like I'll need to shop around for something smaller/lighter based on my payload capacity. Or maybe I'll wait and just get a more capable TV.
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Old 06-16-2019, 01:42 PM   #11
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Just a few random points.

WD hitches tend to weigh about 100 lbs themselves. Propride is generally considered to be the top-of-the-line ultimate best. Andersen is the lightest.

Payload & RAWR (rear axle weight rating) are your two main limiting factors. The closer you get to your payload max the more likely you are to exceed the RAWR.

When shopping for trailers, use 15% of the TT's GVWR (there is usually a sticker near the door or in the frame) to calculate the worst case tongue weight.

Personally, I want to be well under all the limits - less stress on the vehicle and more safety margin when things get sideways.



Agreed, I'd like to have more wiggle room relating to the numbers, but that may mean less wiggle room in the TT for now.

I won't skimp on safety, but the Rockwoods/Flagstaffs really seem to have the best finishes and options of the TT's I've seen so far in the price range. Guess I need to keep searching and find something that I can tow comfortably that will also fit the family.
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Old 06-16-2019, 01:42 PM   #12
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Thanks! It looks like I'll need to shop around for something smaller/lighter based on my payload capacity. Or maybe I'll wait and just get a more capable TV.


There are TT out there you can tow but if you are looking at mountain terrain just remember you have a giant sail behind. I tow a shamrock 183 hybrid model with a traverse and here in Wisconsin we are flat to hilly but upgrading our TV is in the very near future. You honestly would be limited with a large TT like you mentioned. I would look at all options but a new TV would be your best option. But keep in mind even with a new TV like a Chevy 1500 or Ford F-150 or dodge 1500 you could still have a low payload although the newer ones are getting better. So just look at the numbers close and see where you fall. There is something out there for you just make a informed decision and take your time.
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Old 06-16-2019, 01:43 PM   #13
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I would look at the Roo/Shamrock hybrid 183... 3 tip-out queen size bunks, plus another bed OR dining table. At about 5,000# maxxed out it might be within your range and still have adequate bunk space for you and the two boys.
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Old 06-16-2019, 01:50 PM   #14
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I would look at the Roo/Shamrock hybrid 183... 3 tip-out queen size bunks, plus another bed OR dining table. At about 5,000# maxxed out it might be within your range and still have adequate bunk space for you and the two boys.
Thanks! I've looked at similar hybrids, and the wife wont do it. She doesn't really like camping, and while something like that would be fine for me, she wants the solid walls.

I think I just need to convince her that we need a better towing vehicle!
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Old 06-16-2019, 02:35 PM   #15
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Thanks! I've looked at similar hybrids, and the wife wont do it. She doesn't really like camping, and while something like that would be fine for me, she wants the solid walls.
take the cost of the entire investment you will need to make in trailer, acessories and bigger (newer) TV, and divide by $150 or $200... which is probably the average cost of a night for four at a motel...

Answer is probably in the region of 200-300 nights... in real comfort with real walls for the sake of the wife. That is probably 10-15 years worth of camping for most people still working.

my 2cents worth...

Good Luck
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Old 06-16-2019, 03:14 PM   #16
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Most women really like the idea of their own bathroom and own beds and bedding. Not fun dealing with others bedbugs and gross stuff.
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Old 06-16-2019, 03:51 PM   #17
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Doing the latter will give you a lot more options now and in the when, not if, you go bigger. Look at a 3/4 ton and you will be good for a long time. 😁
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Old 06-16-2019, 08:41 PM   #18
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X2 for the 3/4 ton TV. Would also add the Hensley Arrow to your consideration for anti-sway.....it truly eliminates trailer sway. It also is pricey - but worth every penny - and is very heavy. Happy camping!
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Old 06-16-2019, 09:22 PM   #19
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[QUOTE=CurtPutnam;2119500]Just a few random points.

WD hitches tend to weigh about 100 lbs themselves. Propride is generally considered to be the top-of-the-line ultimate best. Andersen is the lightest.

Payload & RAWR (rear axle weight rating) are your two main limiting factors. The closer you get to your payload max the more likely you are to exceed the RAWR.

When shopping for trailers, use 15% of the TT's GVWR (there is usually a sticker near the door or in the frame) to calculate the worst case tongue weight.

Personally, I want to be well under all the limits - less stress on the vehicle and more safety margin when things get sideways.

[/QUOTE

I weighed the head and bars from my Blue OX and it's 60lbs. How does everyone keep coming up with 100+ lbs for WDH ???
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Old 06-16-2019, 09:47 PM   #20
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[/QUOTE

I weighed the head and bars from my Blue OX and it's 60lbs. How does everyone keep coming up with 100+ lbs for WDH ???[/QUOTE]



I have the same hitch and it is 65 lbs. but honestly some hitches are close to 100 and itís not a bad rule of thumb when it comes to weight. Iím not saying you are implying this but If you are that close that 40 lbs will put you over then you probably should look at a new TV or lighter TT.
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