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Old 03-04-2015, 02:44 PM   #1
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Questions on new hitch setup

I know there has been a lot changed in the last few years about how much drop in the front axle with properly adjusted WD setup. My setup seems to ride much better with a drop in the front over unhitched height. I particularly notice this in ride quality and the steering feel. Anyone else breaking the rules?

I have not had a chance to weigh since the first hitch setup, Im not sure how much weight is moving where. I had to add a couple of washers after the initial dealer install once I had food, passengers and tool bag. Above is where it sits now Loaded.
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Old 03-04-2015, 03:32 PM   #2
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I have a 1/8" drop in fender height with the WDH vs. no trailer, and that is a 60 lb. increase on the front axle. That seems to work good for me. With that, both axles are under 90% of the maximum axle ratings.
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Old 03-09-2015, 04:48 PM   #3
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From my perspective:
A. At a minimum, you should return enough weight such that the front ride height is back to the same as unhitched. This means you at least have stock-like stability (same front loading). You don't need to reweigh the vehicle to check this.

B. At the maximum, you should only transfer weight (drop the front ride height) to the point you hit the front GAWR of the vehicle. Obviously, you should never exceed any ratings. This can only be verified completely by weights.

C. The amount of front drop should never exceed the amount of rear drop. That more of a sanity check so you don't unload the rear and jackknife the rig in slippery conditions.

So, if you are running 1/8" lower in the front (vs unhitched), just be sure you aren't exceeding front GAWR. 1/8" isn't much. I'd be more concerned if it were 1/2". Also depends on class of vehicle. F150? Be careful. F350, probably not an issue.
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Old 03-12-2015, 08:24 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrakeman View Post
From my perspective:
A. At a minimum, you should return enough weight such that the front ride height is back to the same as unhitched. This means you at least have stock-like stability (same front loading). You don't need to reweigh the vehicle to check this.

B. At the maximum, you should only transfer weight (drop the front ride height) to the point you hit the front GAWR of the vehicle. Obviously, you should never exceed any ratings. This can only be verified completely by weights.

C. The amount of front drop should never exceed the amount of rear drop. That more of a sanity check so you don't unload the rear and jackknife the rig in slippery conditions.

So, if you are running 1/8" lower in the front (vs unhitched), just be sure you aren't exceeding front GAWR. 1/8" isn't much. I'd be more concerned if it were 1/2". Also depends on class of vehicle. F150? Be careful. F350, probably not an issue.
all good info. But keep in mind that just because it may be a 3/4 or 1ton truck doesnt mean that the front end can handle much weight. A gas jobbie maybe, and newer trucks not quite so bad with everything being plastic and tinfoil, but alot of 3/4 and 1ton diesels dont have alot of headroom on the front axle.

For example, a new diesel ram 3500 has a 5500lb GAWR on the front, and the curb weight is ~4500lbs. Between passengers, beer and other trinkets, you dont really have alot of room to transfer more weight to the front axle.

If it were a gas jobbie, youve got a little more room, but still not 'alot', you'd be looking at a 5200lb axle with a ~3700lb curb weight.

This is even worse when you start talking 'older' trucks, so much as a moderately sized plow would put the front axle overweight
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Old 03-24-2015, 11:38 AM   #5
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Got a chance to weigh in on the way back from a trip this weekend. This is loaded, water tank, black grey. 3/4 freshwater.

Freshwater tank is just forward of the front axle, black tank sits in the rear, grey sits over the rear axle. Trailer is of course fully loaded, minus a bit of food for 2 nights.

Tow vehicle is loaded with 2 adults 1 kid, 1 dog, Tools, gear, firewood; Just over tank of fuel. The only thing that is missing would be a gennie and 5 gallons of fuel. Other than that I think I’m as loaded as I will get.

The Trailer weights threw me off a bit, together 5500, separate 2900 and 2800.

I’m under GVWR by a few hundred (6400) Individual axle weights look good (GAWF 3600 GAWR 3800)

TV Only
F – 2650
R – 2550

TV Hitched No bars
F – 2400
R – 3550

TV hitched with bars
F – 2750
R – 3100

TT hitched with bars
Both axles 5500

F – 2900
R – 2800
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Old 03-24-2015, 01:24 PM   #6
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What is your tow vehicle ?? The reason I ask, is my ~700 lb. tongue weight unloads the front end of my truck about 300 lbs. You are showing a 750 lb. tongue weight, but only unloading your front end only 250 lbs.

My initial thoughts are your setup looks pretty good. Taking out 1 washer may not give you enough weight distributing.
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Old 03-24-2015, 02:21 PM   #7
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Gen 1 Durango.

Maybe short wheel base, or perhaps short rear overhang behind axels? I did have 20 lbs in my air bags, I run them to stiffen up the back.. I did not deflate them when I weighed without the bars.

I did blow them up after I put the bars back on to see if they changed any weight distribution. I went to 70lbs and the weight on the TV was unchanged. Lifted the back about an inch maybe more..
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Old 03-24-2015, 02:54 PM   #8
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Short rear overhang probably is the reason. As you observed, air bags have nothing to do with weight distributing figures.

Double check the figures on your receiver hitch to make sure it is up the task of handing a 750 lb. tongue weight. There should be a sticker on the hitch stating weight carrying capacity, and weight distributing capacity.
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Old 03-25-2015, 11:36 AM   #9
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Does the 2750lbs (front engaged), include the driver and front passenger in the truck?
If yes, and you are still not exceeding the front GAWR, looks good!
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Old 03-25-2015, 11:41 AM   #10
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ykdave,
Agree. My point is that you need to be sure you are not exceeding the front GAWR. That includes an F350. I have to believe that the average diesel F350 has more available front axle capacity than the average F150. But either way, it needs to be checked.
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