Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-24-2013, 12:28 PM   #21
Phat Phrog Stunt Team
 
AquaMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Tipp City, OH
Posts: 6,477
Here's food for thought. Basic mechanical engineering will state that the weakest link will be the first to fail. Now if you were to tow to the max limits of a tow vehicle and of a trailer, but stay within posted weights, where do you think that weakest link is? Now if given the choice, and you MUST pick one, which would you overload first(by same percentage of gross) and feel more comfortable?
__________________

__________________
2016 Georgetown 364TS
Nights Camped 2017 - 49
AquaMan is offline  
Old 04-24-2013, 12:59 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 141
The way I have it figured a average 3/4 ton truck only has about 1000 lbs of available payload for pin weight or tongue weight on a trailer. So there fore you would never be able to pull much of anything. Gcwr of a truck is much less than the gawr. Where do they get payload figures from? The way I see it a as a farmer we are always overloaded just with a empty gooseneck trailer.
__________________

__________________
Brandon327 is offline  
Old 04-24-2013, 01:22 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
mhuffs9017's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Milford, OH
Posts: 132
Just came from a 3/4 to a 1 ton dually just prior to picking up our 36qbok. I'm glad I made the move because this thing is HEAVY and LONG. Our initial drive had us in 30-40mph crosswinds and I didn't even grip the steering wheel while cruising @ 65mph. I would go with the larger tow vehicle, for your sake, and the sake of others on the road. While these limit postings on the truck are more to cover the manufacturer it makes more sense to follow them in cases where liability could be claimed if an accident were to occur.

Stay safe and have fun. Life doesn't always have to be about pushing the limits.
__________________
2013 F350 DRW 6.7 3.73 - Lariat Ultimate FX4 - Tuxedo Black - 14K GVWR
2013 Sabre 36QBOK
2012 Rinker 246BR - "Off The Grid"
Nights Camped 2013 - Not enough!
mhuffs9017 is offline  
Old 04-24-2013, 02:00 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon327 View Post
The way I have it figured a average 3/4 ton truck only has about 1000 lbs of available payload for pin weight or tongue weight on a trailer. So there fore you would never be able to pull much of anything. Gcwr of a truck is much less than the gawr. Where do they get payload figures from? The way I see it a as a farmer we are always overloaded just with a empty gooseneck trailer.
Precisely. And if the farm trucks you know of are like the ones I know of, they have spent a lot of time overloaded and many have lots of miles. The may I am familiar with have never had mechanical failures due to weight, either. Most farmers know how to place a load on a trailer and they know how to adjust their driving according to the load and conditions. That's what adds up to safe towing. Not just staying under what the sticker says.

Just to clarify, I'm not saying you should tow a 15,000 pound camper with a 3000 pound pin weight cross country full timing using a 3/4 ton truck. What I am saying is that in no way, shape, form, or fashion is the payload the maximum amount that a truck can actually carry and be safe. There are just way too many variables to even truly give an accurate number of what a truck can safely haul.
__________________
dustman_stx is offline  
Old 04-24-2013, 03:02 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by ependydad View Post
Given that same newbie - couldn't we make the same argument that they're safeR staying within spec than sending them out in an overloaded situation?
I responded to this earlier and have reconsidered. I suppose you do have a point that, YES, a newbie would be safer with smaller load, but how far do you take that? If they have 2000 pounds of payload would they be safer with that amount than 2500? I'll go along with that. But wouldn't they be safer with 1500? 1000? So why give them the 2000 manufacturer number blindly? Why not reduce that? Is that the magic number? Wouldn't someone with no towing experience be safer driving a Prius to a cabin? I know I'm going to the extreme here, but I'm just trying to say that the number on the sticker is not the be all, end all, of a truck's capacity.
__________________
dustman_stx is offline  
Old 04-24-2013, 03:29 PM   #26
Camper Less Camping
 
Cajun Po-Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: NW
Posts: 3,642
This discussion (Forum) really needs a auto engineer who designs these trucks to weigh in on the cold hard facts about all this tow capability stuff!

If your out there, please reply! LOL
__________________
2013 Sabre 32RCTS-6 (sold)
Family of 4 whose always on the GEAUX!
Cajun Po-Boy is offline  
Old 04-24-2013, 03:49 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragin Cajun View Post
This discussion (Forum) really needs a auto engineer who designs these trucks to weigh in on the cold hard facts about all this tow capability stuff!

If your out there, please reply! LOL
I agree!!! I'm very curious to see how they arrive at the numbers they get without knowing anything about the type of terrain, road conditions, driver experience, type of load(2000 pounds of liquid in the bed will be nothing like 2000 pounds of Sakrete), weather conditions, etc. that a person will be hauling in.
__________________
dustman_stx is offline  
Old 04-24-2013, 04:13 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,365
Just to confuse the matter a bit more, I've heard the only difference between a F250 and F350 SRW is the size of the spring blocks. Same engine, brakes, frame etc. So if I added airbags to my F250, there should be no difference between what I can carry VS an F350.
__________________
Len & Cheri is offline  
Old 04-24-2013, 04:20 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Len & Cheri View Post
Just to confuse the matter a bit more, I've heard the only difference between a F250 and F350 SRW is the size of the spring blocks. Same engine, brakes, frame etc. So if I added airbags to my F250, there should be no difference between what I can carry VS an F350.
And chew on this concerning payload. The only thing limiting payload would be springs, axles, wheels and tires. Brakes aren't even part of the equation. If you don't think that's true, please explain how the brakes are sufficient to stop a trailer that weighs 4000 pounds with no brakes but somehow can only stop 2000ish (3/4 ton) that is loaded into the truck. Axles are clearly rated high enough to get another 1500 to 2000 pounds of payload on most trucks, as are the tires. Wheels should be able to hold at least as much as tires. The only thing that leaves that would limit most 3/4 ton trucks to a 10K GVWR would be the springs. Overloads or air-bags would solve that. Still wanna know where the GVWR number comes from. I think at least part of it, from research, is to meet registration requirements for certain states.
__________________
dustman_stx is offline  
Old 04-24-2013, 04:29 PM   #30
Member
 
Lynkage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,149
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustman_stx View Post
And chew on this concerning payload. The only thing limiting payload would be springs, axles, wheels and tires. Brakes aren't even part of the equation. If you don't think that's true, please explain how the brakes are sufficient to stop a trailer that weighs 4000 pounds with no brakes but somehow can only stop 2000ish (3/4 ton) that is loaded into the truck. Axles are clearly rated high enough to get another 1500 to 2000 pounds of payload on most trucks, as are the tires. Wheels should be able to hold at least as much as tires. The only thing that leaves that would limit most 3/4 ton trucks to a 10K GVWR would be the springs. Overloads or air-bags would solve that. Still wanna know where the GVWR number comes from. I think at least part of it, from research, is to meet registration requirements for certain states.
So since we are talking hypothetical situations, what happens when the authorities determine you were overweight in a injury accident and then the attorneys get a hold of that info?
__________________

__________________
Shane & Antoinette
2012 Ford F-450 SuperDuty
2013 Crusader 355BHQ
Lynkage is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:28 AM.