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Old 04-24-2013, 12:09 AM   #1
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Staying within trucks specs vs. exceeding them - from thread hijack

Who is a pulling a 36qbok with a3/4 ton truck? i currently have a 09 gmc 2500 hd cc short bed 4x4 with duramax Allison combo. I want to gets a new 36qbok but I am thinking my truck will be maxed out on payload. I don't want to get a new truck because the one I have is almost paid for and only 40k miles on it.

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ependydad edit:

I've moved this portion of the discussion/debate into it's own thread in order to isolate the discussion of staying with specs vs. knowingly exceeding them. I've *copied* some posts from the original thread (seen here).

I apologize in advance if my edits appear to be biased in anyway. That was NOT my intention.
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:50 AM   #2
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Engine & Tranny are capable, unfortunately the truck's weight limitations are not enough for that camper.
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:50 AM   #3
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The 36QBOK is basically the same trailer as my 355BHQ. It was too much for my 1 ton SRW. My payload was gone before I even put my family in the truck.
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Old 04-24-2013, 08:17 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by bob34787 View Post
from what I see with a hitch weight of 1825 plus the hitch you are not going to be happy. I am sure you can pull it but I do not think you have enough truck.
The hitch weight on mine weighed in at 2,300 pounds wet and that was *without* any propane (sigh- apparently (sheepish grin)) and that was the first trip of this season before we were able to accumulate crap as the year goes on. It was with minimal water in the gray and black tanks since I was winterized (I don't always dump between trips if I'm going again soon). And, my air compressor wasn't in the basement storage like it usually is (it was further back in the doorway). No firewood or anything.

All told- I surely believe that my pin weight number is going to so nothing but go up.

Brandon- take your family, some stuff representative of your traveling goodies, hitch and go get your truck weighed. It'll tell you what your actual payload is. As you probably read in my weighing thread, my advertised vs. actual payload was a good 1,200 pound difference when we were ready to go.

Also, look for member bjlowe, he's pulling a 36qbok with less truck than I have (man- that sounds insulting but surely isn't meant to). I just don't know if it's a 3/4-ton truck or 1-ton Megacab.
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Old 04-24-2013, 09:07 AM   #5
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This whole payload thing has been debated to death. I have researched this to no end. The only FACTUAL information I can come up with is that legally you cannot exceed the load rating for the tires. According to what I've read from actual LEO's, the sticker on the door is nothing more than a recommendation(Do you get arrested or go to jail or worry about having your rear sued if you change tire size or wheel size or tire pressures-get the picture?). There are literally thousands upon thousands of trucks being used in agriculture applications (and RVing) that routinely have a significant load over what the sticker says. There is no way that a company can post a sticker on the door and that is THE safe limit of what you can haul without knowing what you are hauling, where you are hauling, the climate you are hauling in, your driving experience, the type of load, and probably lots of other things I can't think of right now. The weight police will cry foul if you exceed the RECOMMENDATIONS by an ounce. And they'll give you all kinds of scary scenarios of why not to. I wouldn't recommend seriously overloading your truck to the point of something breaking(which would be a SIGNIFICANT amount over capacity), but a truck with a GVWR of 10,000 will not know the difference if you load it to 11,000. JMHO that I have developed after YEARS of real world experience in towing/hauling and seeing others tow/haul. The weight police can now begin arguing my points.

Just another thought- My in-laws have a Honda minivan with almost the same payload capacity as my parents 1/2 ton Ford pickup- if this doesn't clearly demonstrate the fact that payload capacities are a LONG way from being an amount that will actually break a truck or make it unsafe, I don't know what will.
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Old 04-24-2013, 09:25 AM   #6
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The weight police will cry foul if you exceed the RECOMMENDATIONS by an ounce.
Per the 2012 Ram 3500 Owners manual, they are ratings and specifically state they are not to be exceeded. For me, my truck and my towing - I will not exceed them - regardless of your "YEARS of real world experience in towing/hauling and seeing others tow/haul".

My goal is not to tell someone what to do, but to educate them on how to determine if their RV is going to be within the specs and ratings (again, not "recommendations") of their particular tow vehicle. Then, once educated, if they choose to overload - far be it from me to tell them no. I'll just try to avoid being near them and/or you on the highway if I see a scenario that appears to be grossly overloaded.

I will not debate this, either- except for where you can find official documentation from the truck/vehicle manufacturers that they're "recommendations". If you have written proof of than, I'm all "ears".

Sorry popcorn lovers.
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Old 04-24-2013, 10:02 AM   #7
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I will take some of that popcorn! I am just sharing my opinion and ultimately the decision comes back to the responsibility of the OP who is looking for input. My decision came primarily from one factor. I travel with my DW, 2 kids and a dog, their safety is my number one priority and I have removed an element of risk by towing my 36QBOK with a 350 DRW.

Anyone got butter and some white cheddar seasoning?
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Old 04-24-2013, 10:06 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by dustman_stx View Post
This whole payload thing has been debated to death. I have researched this to no end. The only FACTUAL information I can come up with is that legally you cannot exceed the load rating for the tires. According to what I've read from actual LEO's, the sticker on the door is nothing more than a recommendation(Do you get arrested or go to jail or worry about having your rear sued if you change tire size or wheel size or tire pressures-get the picture?). There are literally thousands upon thousands of trucks being used in agriculture applications (and RVing) that routinely have a significant load over what the sticker says. There is no way that a company can post a sticker on the door and that is THE safe limit of what you can haul without knowing what you are hauling, where you are hauling, the climate you are hauling in, your driving experience, the type of load, and probably lots of other things I can't think of right now. The weight police will cry foul if you exceed the RECOMMENDATIONS by an ounce. And they'll give you all kinds of scary scenarios of why not to. I wouldn't recommend seriously overloading your truck to the point of something breaking(which would be a SIGNIFICANT amount over capacity), but a truck with a GVWR of 10,000 will not know the difference if you load it to 11,000. JMHO that I have developed after YEARS of real world experience in towing/hauling and seeing others tow/haul. The weight police can now begin arguing my points.

Just another thought- My in-laws have a Honda minivan with almost the same payload capacity as my parents 1/2 ton Ford pickup- if this doesn't clearly demonstrate the fact that payload capacities are a LONG way from being an amount that will actually break a truck or make it unsafe, I don't know what will.
When researching this prior to buying our trailer, this was one of my main concerns. Went out to the local highway scales and asked the ones that enforce it here in Alberta.

The LEO stated that "as a general practice, we don't look at the sticker on the door. We look at what the tires are rated for, multiple by 2 (for SRW) and then subract truck weight at rear axle. This gives us pin allowance"

When I bought the trailer, I took what the trailer label stated the hitch weight was and calculated that I was indeed under the LEO's definition. I'm under the label on the door of the truck too, but there is definitely a difference between the two.

Again, this is what was told to me as it applies to Alberta. The LEO also said that this method would be applicable to BC as well (but I'm not sure about SK or the US)

I still want room using either calculation as I don't want to overload the truck. I would say that if you're anywhere close on the limits of door label / tires, look into something bigger truck wise....

J.
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Old 04-24-2013, 11:14 AM   #9
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This does bring up an interesting thought in my mind. Think there could be some good, calm discussion on it. The big fifths with dual rear slides, ok, 2nd bath, etc. have more weight behind the axle than some, which can cause the pw to be lighter than one would expect. I had looked at two other fivers just days Before putting money down on our tbok. The heritage glen 346 & 356(i think). The bigger of the two had a much lighter pin weight due to the large rear bunkhouse and full 2nd bath at the rear of the unit. Based on its numbers, id be better off with the 356, even though its heavier and longer.
Thoughts? -- not trying to stir up a hornets nest, but interesting at least to me.
One thing I'll note. I do believe that folks with years and years of towing experience can trump those of us that only in the last couple years have towed much weight. I've towed construction trailers all over the US, and many were double the vehicles ratings. Not safe, yet i never had any troubles.
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Old 04-24-2013, 11:16 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by jtstromsburg View Post
This does bring up an interesting thought in my mind. Think there could be some good, calm discussion on it. The big fifths with dual rear slides, ok, 2nd bath, etc. have more weight behind the axle than some, which can cause the pw to be lighter than one would expect. I had looked at two other fivers just days Before putting money down on our tbok. The heritage glen 346 & 356(i think). The bigger of the two had a much lighter pin weight due to the large rear bunkhouse and full 2nd bath at the rear of the unit. Based on its numbers, id be better off with the 356, even though its heavier and longer.
Thoughts? -- not trying to stir up a hornets nest, but interesting at least to me.
This is true. Due to my 36QBOK's configuration, my pin weight is only 16.5% of my camper's total weight. This was significantly less than the 20-25% "norm" that is mentioned when planning for weight calculations.
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