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Old 09-07-2014, 09:49 AM   #21
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Yes it is a 7.3 diesel with no exhaust brake. Three miles may not see very long for experienced mountain towers but I have been up and down this grade (Saluda grade I26 NC) many times in the car and the car will pick up a lot of speed and require intermitent braking.

My worries are going up are temps and going down safely of course. My truck tends to increase exhaust temps at lower RPMs then at higher under acceleration. I know diesels have very little engine breaking compared to a gas engine so I have concerns on the down hill slide.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:50 AM   #22
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Listen to the experienced and professional drivers; they're correct on towing and braking advice. The only thing I have to add on the "tech" side: not all parking brakes are the same. Some use the disc/rotor and some (as on my Tundra) have a separate drum/shoe parking brake.
May I add this one piece of advice? Be selfish. By that I mean it's your truck, your trailer, your trip, your life. Do what makes you comfortable. If you need to descend a grade at 35 mph to maintain control and peace of mind, do it. If you need to keep the RPMs in a certain range to avoid stressing your truck (and yourself) going up a steep grade then do it.
Having said that, I also advise as another stress reducer to pull over if your poking along causes a back up of any sort. It's courteous and there's no feeling quite like that of having to take a 12% with no one behind you.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:52 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harderd View Post
I know diesels have very little engine breaking compared to a gas engine so I have concerns on the down hill slide.
Actually, it's the opposite. Diesels run a 23:1 (or more) compression ratio so the effect of engine braking is markedly stronger with a diesel.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:53 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by awellis3 View Post
Listen to the experienced and professional drivers; they're correct on towing and braking advice. The only thing I have to add on the "tech" side: not all parking brakes are the same. Some use the disc/rotor and some (as on my Tundra) have a separate drum/shoe parking brake.
May I add this one piece of advice? Be selfish. By that I mean it's your truck, your trailer, your trip, your life. Do what makes you comfortable. If you need to descend a grade at 35 mph to maintain control and peace of mind, do it. If you need to keep the RPMs in a certain range to avoid stressing your truck (and yourself) going up a steep grade then do it.
Having said that, I also advise as another stress reducer to pull over if your poking along causes a back up of any sort. It's courteous and there's no feeling quite like that of having to take a 12% with no one behind you.
Amen! X2
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:54 AM   #25
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I would think that a lower gear/higher RPM would keep exhaust temps lower. You need exhaust flow to carry the heat away.

I live in Delaware, I have to drive a few hours to find a hill
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Old 09-07-2014, 10:07 AM   #26
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I would think that a lower gear/higher RPM would keep exhaust temps lower. You need exhaust flow to carry the heat away.

I live in Delaware, I have to drive a few hours to find a hill

You are correct Dave. Even though the engine is at a higher RPM no fuel is being applied. If your motor and cooling system is in decent shape it shouldn't over heat.


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Old 09-07-2014, 10:24 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by awellis3 View Post
Listen to the experienced and professional drivers; they're correct on towing and braking advice. The only thing I have to add on the "tech" side: not all parking brakes are the same. Some use the disc/rotor and some (as on my Tundra) have a separate drum/shoe parking brake.
May I add this one piece of advice? Be selfish. By that I mean it's your truck, your trailer, your trip, your life. Do what makes you comfortable. If you need to descend a grade at 35 mph to maintain control and peace of mind, do it. If you need to keep the RPMs in a certain range to avoid stressing your truck (and yourself) going up a steep grade then do it.
Having said that, I also advise as another stress reducer to pull over if your poking along causes a back up of any sort. It's courteous and there's no feeling quite like that of having to take a 12% with no one behind you.
Quote:
Originally Posted by awellis3 View Post
Actually, it's the opposite. Diesels run a 23:1 (or more) compression ratio so the effect of engine braking is markedly stronger with a diesel.

Both excellent advice...
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Old 09-07-2014, 10:34 AM   #28
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To OP- how much weight do you have behind you?


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Old 09-07-2014, 11:23 AM   #29
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My dry weight is 13500, so I estimate aroung 15000 - 15500
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Old 09-07-2014, 11:39 AM   #30
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When I was trained for my CDL just over 20 years ago, the federally accepted method for steep downgrades was...


to maintain the same gear/approximate speed you used to climb the hill (steeper=slower for down as well as up)

to only allow your speed to increase by 5mph, then apply "moderate" brake pressure to slow back to your desired speed, repeat
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