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Old 01-25-2015, 11:15 PM   #21
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As long as you are aware of what youve got, and what you dont have, drive accordingly and youll be fine.

Youve got a decent trans by the sound of it, and cooling. A bit of boost will be a nice thing for a little more snort getting up some hills and efficiency cruising.

Sounds like youve done your share of research and know what your getting into. What you likely already know is that its not a viable solution for extended periods of high load unless the engine is built accordingly.

The only thing that scares me is that you dont like to let that screaming banshee scream. Not so much of an issue with a stock engine (other than they are pretty sluggish down low) but when your ramming a few pounds of boost down its throat with alot more fuel, the faster you spin that sucker the longer and happier life it will live. increasing rpms (you dont need to redline every hill LOL) decreases heat transfer to the pistons-rings-cyl-cooling system. Lugging along at low(ish) rpms at 'high' boost under high load (steep grade) is a surefire way to coat your exhaust system with aluminum!

In all reality, as long as your not driving it like its got a billion HP (use it as an efficiency increase and short term power) i doubt youll every have an issue, high mile engine or not.

If i wasnt such a diesel nut and already have the trucks, a boosted LS would be my next choice
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Old 01-26-2015, 09:39 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by ykdave View Post
As long as you are aware of what youve got, and what you dont have, drive accordingly and youll be fine.

Youve got a decent trans by the sound of it, and cooling. A bit of boost will be a nice thing for a little more snort getting up some hills and efficiency cruising.

Sounds like youve done your share of research and know what your getting into. What you likely already know is that its not a viable solution for extended periods of high load unless the engine is built accordingly.

The only thing that scares me is that you dont like to let that screaming banshee scream. Not so much of an issue with a stock engine (other than they are pretty sluggish down low) but when your ramming a few pounds of boost down its throat with alot more fuel, the faster you spin that sucker the longer and happier life it will live. increasing rpms (you dont need to redline every hill LOL) decreases heat transfer to the pistons-rings-cyl-cooling system. Lugging along at low(ish) rpms at 'high' boost under high load (steep grade) is a surefire way to coat your exhaust system with aluminum!

In all reality, as long as your not driving it like its got a billion HP (use it as an efficiency increase and short term power) i doubt youll every have an issue, high mile engine or not.

If i wasnt such a diesel nut and already have the trucks, a boosted LS would be my next choice
Good observations, and well noted.
I know the LS loves to rev, I'm just not a throttle jockey and don't see the need to rev over 4 grand for long periods. I totally understand your remarks about heat. As I understand it, the LQ4 will handle a low boost of 5-6 lbs. easily. That is what the stock TVS1900 puts out to mate to the LQ4 by design.
Many guys out there are putting a smaller pulley on the supercharger, effectively increasing speed, thus boost to 10-12 lbs and racing these engines. I can see that this would push the envelope quickly.

I'm not pulling the trigger just yet. I want to see how my Black Bear Precision custom tune works first before seriously considering a blower. I love my Heavy Chevy and don't want to hurt it.
My brother is a huge motor head and knows the LS platform as well as anyone. He suggested just a cam and head swap (L92) would really wake this engine up too.

Much to consider, but it is fun.
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Old 01-26-2015, 10:36 AM   #23
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I wonder about the cam and head swap idea. That sounds to me like a strategy to increase horsepower at higher RPM, not torque at lower RPM. You don't need more horsepower or revs; you need torque at the low end.
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Old 01-26-2015, 11:16 AM   #24
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I wonder about the cam and head swap idea. That sounds to me like a strategy to increase horsepower at higher RPM, not torque at lower RPM. You don't need more horsepower or revs; you need torque at the low end.
This was my thought. I think you will actually lose low end torque by using higher flowing heads and a bigger cam. You'll want to be careful about who you get LS advice from as the majority of people modding LS motors are looking for speed and racing performance- very different from what you need. You've already gone to synthetic fluids, you are running looking at a quality supercharger, you plan to keep boost reasonable and you know to run 93 octane. I say go for it.
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Old 01-26-2015, 11:27 AM   #25
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I wonder about the cam and head swap idea. That sounds to me like a strategy to increase horsepower at higher RPM, not torque at lower RPM. You don't need more horsepower or revs; you need torque at the low end.
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This was my thought. I think you will actually lose low end torque by using higher flowing heads and a bigger cam. You'll want to be careful about who you get LS advice from as the majority of people modding LS motors are looking for speed and racing performance- very different from what you need. You've already gone to synthetic fluids, you are running looking at a quality supercharger, you plan to keep boost reasonable and you know to run 93 octane. I say go for it.
You guys are right on the money.
That is why my first choice is a blower.
It's even suggested that by simply changing the stock exhaust (manifolds, etc.) you will lose low end torque - just what I don't want. A lot of guys are putting shorty or long tube headers on and then complain about losing torque. The stock manifolds are said to flow very well and still provide the back pressure that helps create torque. Head, cam and exhaust mods are for street racers IMO.

Great discussion and insightful feedback! I knew I would get some helpful info here.
Keep it coming.
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Old 01-26-2015, 12:12 PM   #26
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Another thing to think about. And I'm not sure of the implications. But, my sense is that you will be using your truck differently than most people who are mounting superchargers. I would guess most guys are "hot rodding"; that is intense, short bursts of power. You will be using less boost and throttle but you will be constantly "into" the boost; perhaps for hours at a time.

I would discuss what this might mean with your speed shop. You might actually be subject to higher heat stress (or buildup) because of your towing needs and the longer periods of boost.

I might liken it to a short hard application of the brakes versus a light but ongoing application of the brakes. The latter is what would take the rotors out and warp them from heat buildup. There might be an analogy there. But I think you will know what I am getting at.
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Old 01-26-2015, 12:20 PM   #27
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The only thing that scares me is that you dont like to let that screaming banshee scream. Not so much of an issue with a stock engine (other than they are pretty sluggish down low) but when your ramming a few pounds of boost down its throat with alot more fuel, the faster you spin that sucker the longer and happier life it will live. increasing rpms (you dont need to redline every hill LOL) decreases heat transfer to the pistons-rings-cyl-cooling system. Lugging along at low(ish) rpms at 'high' boost under high load (steep grade) is a surefire way to coat your exhaust system with aluminum!
I think you are saying perhaps the same thing that I was trying to express. I once had a mechanic tell me that "lugging" an engine with high throttle at low RPM is like taking a welder to the tops of your pistons.

So, not trying to scare you off on your potential project. Just food for thought.
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Old 01-26-2015, 12:24 PM   #28
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Bob is saying what I was trying to say about comparisons to the EcoBoost... and the fact that that engine is designed for this, and yours isn't.
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Old 01-26-2015, 01:31 PM   #29
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You must REALLY dislike diesels.
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Old 01-26-2015, 03:41 PM   #30
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Another thing to think about. And I'm not sure of the implications. But, my sense is that you will be using your truck differently than most people who are mounting superchargers. I would guess most guys are "hot rodding"; that is intense, short bursts of power. You will be using less boost and throttle but you will be constantly "into" the boost; perhaps for hours at a time.

I would discuss what this might mean with your speed shop. You might actually be subject to higher heat stress (or buildup) because of your towing needs and the longer periods of boost.

I might liken it to a short hard application of the brakes versus a light but ongoing application of the brakes. The latter is what would take the rotors out and warp them from heat buildup. There might be an analogy there. But I think you will know what I am getting at.
Right now, this is my only concern, and well stated.

I found the below on Magnusons web site which I found interesting:
When I changed from a Class 1 trailer to a Class 3 trailer, the 5.3 just could not easily pull the load. The Yukon was in 3rd gear at 3K rpm at 70mph on flat road and any incline meant that it was downshifting to 2nd gear at about 4,400 rpm and struggling to maintain speed. This was a recipe for engine disaster. I chose Magnuson for a supercharger because it was the only maker who had a program for towing.... Now, I cruise at 1,800 rpm in 4th gear at 70 mph on flat roads and go up inclines for quite a distance before the transmission shifts to 3rd gear at 3k rpm and I back off the throttle as it will begin accelerating up the hill. I also noticed an increase in gas mileage as I am operating at a much lower rpm. This has also helped my water and transmission oil temperatures to go down noticeably.

This does make sense in the manner that the engine isn't working as hard, and there is much more air actually flowing through the engine.
Another consideration is that fuel mileage is proven to be similar with or without boost, suggesting that you are simply increasing the volume of air moving through the engine. Perhaps the use of high octane fuel also helps keep temps down?

I've also communicated the same concern to Engineering at Magnuson and will share what they say if/when I get a response.

Thanks again for the helpful insights.


EDIT:
I got an immediate response from Magnuson as follows:

"...you wont need to worry about the temperatures getting any higher than they would stock. You wont be at full boost at 2000 RPM unless you are at wide open throttle ...it may go into 1-2 PSI at that RPM going up a grade but normally it will downshift if it needs that extra grunt. We tow a 35' enclosed gooseneck trailer with a car and show supplies all around the US, the power tour, moab, sema ....it has over 90,000 towing miles and going strong its a 2010 2500 hd with the 6.0L"

More food for thought.
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