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Old 04-24-2015, 01:37 PM   #11
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No doubt you have P tires and should inflate them to the max of 44# when towing or switch to 4 LT tires as well as dropping 4 links instead of 3.
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Old 04-24-2015, 01:42 PM   #12
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I'll add...I was towing a 4,200 lbs trailer with a Pathfinder V6 (6,000 max towing) to a basic V8 Silverado 1500 (9,600 max towing) the difference was night and day.
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Old 04-24-2015, 02:10 PM   #13
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Sway control

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Originally Posted by Pam wise View Post
I have a 2006 Envoy XL to pull my 2011 Rockwood Roo 183. It's an I6 with 3.73 gear ratio and a towing capacity of 5800 lbs. The hybrid's loaded weight is rated at approx. 4600 lbs. so I feel like I should be in a safe towing range. However, while towing, I feel like I'm floating on the road and really feel the wind and especially when a big truck goes by. What is the problem? weight of the tow vehicle? I have a weight distribution hitch and adjusted the links which have helped somewhat. If I need a different SUV, what features do I need to pay attention to? Seems like it's not all about engine size but weight of vehicle.
I also recommend you find out how much weight you are actually pulling and you really need to add a sway control device. Before you head out on the next trip, go to a local truck stop with scales and weigh the TV (tow vehicle). You need it to be full of fuel, and loaded with about the same amount of weight and people you normally carry camping. The truck stop will give you a piece of paper with the weight for your records. Next time you are hooked up and head out, stop in the truck stop with scales again and weigh the TV, then the entire rig, and then just the trailer. The people running the scales will assist you in doing this, no worries. You will be able to determine how much Gross Vehicle Weight you actually have and if you are really under the limits. Using the previous weight ticket for the TV, you can determine how much weight is on the hitch also with a little subtraction. My bet is that you have too much weight on the hitch which will make the front of your TV drift or "float" along. Adjusting the hitch will help if you are not overweight.
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Old 04-24-2015, 02:33 PM   #14
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Bingo!

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Originally Posted by D_B Travelers View Post
I also recommend you find out how much weight you are actually pulling and you really need to add a sway control device. Before you head out on the next trip, go to a local truck stop with scales and weigh the TV (tow vehicle). You need it to be full of fuel, and loaded with about the same amount of weight and people you normally carry camping. The truck stop will give you a piece of paper with the weight for your records. Next time you are hooked up and head out, stop in the truck stop with scales again and weigh the TV, then the entire rig, and then just the trailer. The people running the scales will assist you in doing this, no worries. You will be able to determine how much Gross Vehicle Weight you actually have and if you are really under the limits. Using the previous weight ticket for the TV, you can determine how much weight is on the hitch also with a little subtraction. My bet is that you have too much weight on the hitch which will make the front of your TV drift or "float" along. Adjusting the hitch will help if you are not overweight.
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Old 04-24-2015, 02:56 PM   #15
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You are correct in your assumption that a tow vehicle's capacity is much more than the engine. An old adage for RV's is "You can never have too much tow vehicle".
Certainly you should consider tongue weight, GVWR, engine capacity, gearing, suspension and tires, but as you may of discovered vehicle size may also contribute.
You also need to consider the roads you usually travel or plan to travel. Out west you'll find mountains and wind, which are two things that greatly effect towing.
It also depends on how often the vehicle is used to tow your RV. If it's five days a year it's tough to justify a newer bigger vehicle just for towing.
In my opinion, if you're going to tow most anything you should consider at least a 3/4 ton pickup. It may seem like overkill, but when you're pulling a hill, attempting to pass, bucking a head wind or cross wind or any of the many other things we encounter, you'll be thankful for size and capacity.
We bought a four door 3/4 4x4 gas engined pickup for towing, and were amazed at how often we use it for non-towing or non-RVing. A four door pickup is a very versatile vehicle.

No quite sure I agree with your statement "if you're going to tow most anything you should consider at least a 3/4 ton pickup". That is quite a bit of capacity for a small HTT. But I respect your opinion.

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Old 04-24-2015, 03:21 PM   #16
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If your hitch set up is right you really should have LT tires .If the shocks are factory or have over 50k on them its time for new gas shocks.
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Old 04-24-2015, 04:30 PM   #17
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Roo 183 (new models anyway) is 3653 dry, and 4820 GVWR. So the 4600 could have been the GVWR in 2011 (?) and/or it could be the actual loaded weight if you really load this thing a lot! Most with a small hybrid would only be 600-800 over dry.

1. Make sure loaded properly, with at least 10% on ball, preferably 12-13%.
2. Measure front wheel well height before attaching trailer.
3. Measure fww height again after attaching trailer and engaging WDH.

a. If front wheel well height has been returned to original height, then you just have an inherent stability issue. Add a friction sway controller.
b. If front wwh is still higher than original, you need to lift the WDH bars more, and/or tilt the WD head back further, until front wwh is back to stock height.
c. After adjusting WDH properly, if trailer is no longer level (tongue high), disassemble the head from the drawbar, and lower 1 position (typically 1.25" between holes). You will then need to take wheel well adjustments again, and be sure you have returned to stock.
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Old 04-24-2015, 04:38 PM   #18
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I am towing a 183 myself, and before that a 21BH. You will feel truccks and wind. Perfectly normal. I did upgrade my tires from 225/75R16 to 245/70R16XL and run 50psi in the back and 45 in the front. If 95% of my driving wasn't commuting, I would have gotten LT tires. I also keep my speed to 60 or below. I also have air bags. I noticed last year when I lost my air bags due to not checking them all winter, the tow wasn't as stable. I don't use much air, maybe 15psi max, just to level out the Jeep.
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Old 04-24-2015, 04:47 PM   #19
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Getting used to towing

Pam_wise, as others have pointed out you will get more acquainted with the characteristics of your TV and trailer the more you tow. When we picked up our 35' trailer the first time and headed out on the highway we were terrified right down from the dealership when we hit a series of humps in the road that made everything porpoise up and down. We thought we were going to be on edge everywhere we went until we realized it was just that section of road and not something common. Still, you will soon know what "normal" is when towing and become an old hand at this fun hobby. Just follow the advise on adjusting hitch weight and get a sway bar asap. Enjoy!
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Old 04-24-2015, 04:55 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinmaker View Post
No quite sure I agree with your statement "if you're going to tow most anything you should consider at least a 3/4 ton pickup". That is quite a bit of capacity for a small HTT. But I respect your opinion.

Vin.
I agree. It all depends on what you are pulling. And what the TV us capable of towing.
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