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Old 07-02-2019, 10:40 AM   #1
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Tire pressure on TV

I upgraded my tires from load range E to F. They are Toyo Open Country AT 35x12.5x20, they make range E and F. Do I follow the door sticker for tire pressure or pump them up to 80psi like the tire says? I was thinking I'd leave the fronts at sticker pressure and pump the rears up to 80psi when towing for max load capability, then put them back to sticker with no trailer. Is this the correct way to do it?
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Old 07-02-2019, 10:52 AM   #2
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I would use a LOAD inflation table from the tire manufacture as to what air pressure to use with what loads that your aftermarket tires would support.

I am using 70 PSI on my rear tires and 55 PSI on my front tires since I am using Nitto Dura Grappler tires, LT285/70R/17 126S on my truck. When I am not towing all tires are at 55 PSI. The 70 PSI in the rear tires will support a load of 3415 LBS and if I ran them at 80 PSI this would support a load of 3750 LBS. The 55 PSI will support a load of 2890 pounds each.
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Old 07-02-2019, 10:55 AM   #3
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Very interested in answers to this. I had exact same situation. Talked to tire dealer and got his opinion.... Completely different from what others have posted as opinion, whi is pump em up to the cold pressure stated on tire. My tire dealer suggested 40 PSI. ...Tires say 80PSI on em.... Door sticker says 36 PSI but those wer the factory installed tires. ???? Lets see....
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Old 07-02-2019, 11:05 AM   #4
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Simple. The door sticker applies to a particular tire size, load range, and weight. You changed the tire specs. Sticker no longer applies. Use a psi between that shown on a load range chart for your new tire and the actual weight on the tire, and the cold max psi on the tire. Easy.
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Old 07-02-2019, 11:06 AM   #5
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Door sticker psi is a compromise between occupant comfort and handling for "normal" driving. For towing, you can raise the pressure all the way up to max. sidewall psi. Will depend on the particular TV you have and what you're towing.

We just got a GMC Sierra 2500HD and the sticker says to inflate the rears to 80 psi and fronts to 65. We previously had an F250 for 7 years and I always ran the rears at 80 and fronts at 75 (can't remember what was on the sticker but was less than this). I did that after experimenting with different pressures and found that gave me better handling and sway reduction, which to me is much more important that ride comfort. I keep the tires pumped up over the camping season and drop it over the winter.

You will get opinions all over the place and some will insist on staying with the sticker amount or going by load inflation tables...
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Old 07-02-2019, 11:10 AM   #6
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I think if I ran 80psi on all 4 all of the time, it would be a very rough ride. That's why I was thinking of just bumping the rears up to 80psi when towing, then lowering them to sticker for driving. The tires are rated for 3640lbs at 80psi and my rim manufacturer said the rims are good for 3640lbs.
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Old 07-02-2019, 11:27 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by gbaldwin View Post
Very interested in answers to this. I had exact same situation. Talked to tire dealer and got his opinion.... Completely different from what others have posted as opinion, whi is pump em up to the cold pressure stated on tire. My tire dealer suggested 40 PSI. ...Tires say 80PSI on em.... Door sticker says 36 PSI but those wer the factory installed tires. ???? Lets see....

Unfortunately many tire dealers and their employees rely on the old "Extractamus Ex Wazoo" method for determining tire pressures when upsizing.

These same dealers probably don't have, or can't find, a load inflation table for the tire they just sold.

Go to the manufacturer's website and obtain the load/inflation table for the tires purchased. Find the size then follow across the line to the weight shown as max load on the vehicle sticker. Go to the top of that column and see what pressure is recommended. This will give you a pressure that the tire will perform well at when loaded with the max weight for the vehicle. From there pressures can be adjusted upwards, usually on the rear axle, to reduce any sway.

Running an upsized tire at the max pressure molded into the sidewall can not only yield a rough ride, it can reduce the life of the tire by inducing excessive tread wear. Also reduces the tire "footprint" so traction on slippery roads can be reduced.


Once again, the pressure molded on the sidewall of a tire is only the MAXIMUM pressure for that tire with the tire loaded to it's maximum weight.

The only time it may be the correct pressure is when the tire is loaded to it's max, where the manufacturer only put the minimum load range tire on the vehicle for it's design weight.
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Old 07-02-2019, 11:33 AM   #8
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I think if I ran 80psi on all 4 all of the time, it would be a very rough ride. That's why I was thinking of just bumping the rears up to 80psi when towing, then lowering them to sticker for driving. The tires are rated for 3640lbs at 80psi and my rim manufacturer said the rims are good for 3640lbs.
Personally I don't find 80 psi to be harsh at all even for hours of driving a day, neither does DW. Depends somewhat on the tires too. Just got new GY Wrangler tires that have a stiffer kevlar side belt and can definitely feel the road more compared to our old Michelin LTX. We also have Bilsteins too. I prefer the handling to be crisp and predictable, kinda like a sports car.
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Old 07-02-2019, 12:13 PM   #9
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Recent oil change place reduced my presssure as stated on the door sticker(with factory tires) to 36 PSI. thos upgraded Toyo tire road noise ws unbearable.
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Old 07-02-2019, 12:17 PM   #10
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Recent oil change place reduced my presssure as stated on the door sticker(with factory tires) to 36 PSI. thos upgraded Toyo tire road noise ws unbearable.
Don't you hate that? When I have to use one of the oil change places, I tell them to NOT touch the tires and the air filter. They seem to always screw up the pressures, and never get the air filter back in correctly. I just don't understand. Saves me some aggravation
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Old 07-02-2019, 12:18 PM   #11
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The Toyo Open Country AT's aren't that noisy. The MT and RT's were pretty load though. Had them on my other truck.
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Old 07-02-2019, 12:26 PM   #12
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Always ran 70 front and 80 rear on my f350. Guess I'll be experimenting on the new dually.
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Old 07-02-2019, 12:39 PM   #13
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The door sticker for tire pressure Only applies to the OEM tires that were on there when it left the factory. Another tire manufacturer of the same size may have other pressure and load parameters. Go with the new tire inflation levels. A tire with higher towing capacity than your truck does not change the capacity or increase your load capacity beyond what the truck was designed for or stated on the placard. In fact it's illegal 'IF' Barney Fife pull you over for a strip search! Carrying over the load limit of any component.
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Old 07-02-2019, 01:46 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by myredracer View Post
Personally I don't find 80 psi to be harsh at all even for hours of driving a day, neither does DW. Depends somewhat on the tires too. Just got new GY Wrangler tires that have a stiffer kevlar side belt and can definitely feel the road more compared to our old Michelin LTX. We also have Bilsteins too. I prefer the handling to be crisp and predictable, kinda like a sports car.
There's more to it than just PSI. What type of roads are travelled on (I could ride all day on fresh blacktop with ridiculous PSI in the tires), what vehicle, what size (especially how narrow) is the tire, what diameter is the wheel? GM for example is typically softer riding to begin with, and in the past they've used smaller, narrower tires on smaller rims. A narrower tire needs more PSI typically to provide the same support. A smaller rim provides a better ride. Our Ram has fairly big wide tires from factory and doesn't need anywhere near 80 PSI. All that does is create a harsh ride unnecessarily, it causes the tire to ride in the middle of the tread creating uneven wear and reducing traction. Load and inflation table and actual weights is what should be used.
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Old 07-02-2019, 08:02 PM   #15
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We run the tires on our 2008 Silverado 2500 HD Diesel at 60 psi fronts, 79 psi rears. Have done so since bought new. We have recently turned over 100K miles, mostly towing, including several cross-country trips with a 30-foot TT and lately a 35-foot Cardinal 5th wheel. Ride quality while not towing is not an issue as we rarely take long trips without towing. Recently replaced all four TV tires with Michelin LT 245/75R 16 tires. We expect at least 50-60K miles from these new tires.
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Old 07-02-2019, 11:50 PM   #16
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Ok so I have a question. I have always wondered about this. Do you air up the tires to max psi when cold or do you stay a little lower since you wiull be towing on them and the pressure will increase with the heat? If this is a dumb question, i'm sorry, but I have always wondered this.
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Old 07-03-2019, 12:18 AM   #17
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The recommended tire pressures as published on various sources, including OEM vehicle manuals and stickers on door sills, are based on tire pressures when measured at average temperatures while the vehicle is at rest. That is always our starting point. From time to time, if we are driving in extreme heat compared to our starting point, or at very high elevations, I will stop and adjust tire pressures a bit lower. I make note of those adjustments, and always bring tire pressures up to factory recommended pressures before starting back out on the road the next day. We have never experienced a tire problem in 45+ years of RV-ing that could be traced to "over-inflation". We hope our luck holds for at least another 45+ years!!
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:28 AM   #18
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Ok so I have a question. I have always wondered about this. Do you air up the tires to max psi when cold or do you stay a little lower since you wiull be towing on them and the pressure will increase with the heat? If this is a dumb question, i'm sorry, but I have always wondered this.
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:51 AM   #19
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My door says 55 front and 80 rear. Once when not towing I dropped to 40 front and 35 rear. The ride was much improved. This is on a GMC HD2500 with load range E tires. If it was my daily driver I would do it again but it's a lot of bother when I seldom use the truck other than towing.
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Old 07-03-2019, 08:54 AM   #20
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Ok so I have a question. I have always wondered about this. Do you air up the tires to max psi when cold or do you stay a little lower since you wiull be towing on them and the pressure will increase with the heat? If this is a dumb question, i'm sorry, but I have always wondered this.
You only adjust the tire pressure cold. I usually do it in the morning, hopefully before the sun shines on them but that's not always possible. Do not bleed off pressure because you think it's too high after driving or sitting in the sun, that's factored in.
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