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Old 10-19-2014, 07:55 PM   #41
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Thanks, that's helpful.
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Old 10-19-2014, 11:15 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by falcnjet View Post
Nope. Not either place. All they have is the basic hitch limit.
Let me ask this - what % increase do you usually get with a WD hitch over the basic hitch?
If the hitch just has a weight carrying limit listed it may not be able to be used as a WDH.

You should check the owners manual and the build sheet for the TV using the VIN.
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Old 10-20-2014, 12:00 AM   #43
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I'm probably using bad terminology here. I do have weight ratings on the hitch. It's an EAZLift Wt. Dist'n hitch with the following ratings: MGTWR=14,000 for weight dist'n, 6,000 for weight carrying; MVHC=1,400 and 600. What I'm concerned about is the TV's 720 lb Tongue Weight limit. The trailer specs say that the "Dry Weight, Hitch" is 740 lbs. I'm wondering whether or not I can still tow the trailer because I am using the wt. dist'n hitch. And if so, how do I know that?
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Old 10-20-2014, 01:13 AM   #44
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You've got several limiting factors. Hitch rating is separate from receiver rating and separate from axle/payload/etc limits. Just guessing, but I'm willing to bet that 720 lb limit is due to the receiver installed on the vehicle. It's probably matched to your tow rating as well. To answer your question in part, you can't increase your TW capacity by putting a larger hitch on. The hitch may handle 1400 lbs, but the rest of the links in the system won't. Again, keep in mind tour actual TW is going to be more than the dry weight. Probably approaching 900 lbs. You could replace the receiver with the next size up, but I'd do some calculating first. It won't do much good to have the hardware if you're way over payliad and axle limits.


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Old 10-20-2014, 09:19 AM   #45
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You've got several limiting factors. Hitch rating is separate from receiver rating and separate from axle/payload/etc limits. Just guessing, but I'm willing to bet that 720 lb limit is due to the receiver installed on the vehicle. It's probably matched to your tow rating as well. To answer your question in part, you can't increase your TW capacity by putting a larger hitch on. The hitch may handle 1400 lbs, but the rest of the links in the system won't. Again, keep in mind tour actual TW is going to be more than the dry weight. Probably approaching 900 lbs. You could replace the receiver with the next size up, but I'd do some calculating first. It won't do much good to have the hardware if you're way over payliad and axle limits.
Bingo! You said it much better than I did!
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Old 10-20-2014, 09:20 AM   #46
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Thanks raspivey. I think I'm getting to the point where I understand. What the TV specs call "Max. Tongue Wt." is the vertical weight limit on the receiver (720#). And I assume that what the TT specs call "Dry wt., hitch" is the vertical weight the empty trailer puts on the hitch ball (740#). Since the hitch rests in the receiver, I assume that puts me over the tongue wt. limit.

What I'm really trying to find out, and what the sales person is trying to convince me of, is whether it's true that when the wt. distribution components are all hooked up, enough weight is transferred off the receiver to the frame to keep me from exceeding the tongue weight limit. I can't find this discussed anywhere and of course I don't want to just trust the salesman.

All other weight limits won't be exceeded. I'm not trying to tow a trailer heavier than the limits of the TV or anything like that. MCWR or the TV's max gross weight and axle weights are not being exceeded. It's just the tongue weight limit that's at issue.

Thanks again.
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Old 10-20-2014, 09:27 AM   #47
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I pull a similar size trailer with my Libby. It can be done.
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Old 10-20-2014, 12:58 PM   #48
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Hi,

I have a 2011 Forest River mini lite 2304. No sliders or extra weight.
Opinions/advice about whether it could be towed with an SUV? If so, which one do you recommend?
Presently have a 2007 Ford F150 long bed. Need to replace it.
Thanks
Certainly! Why not?
We tow our 27' 5200 lbs hybrid (no slides either), with a 7000 lb rated Mountaineer, and love it. It's one of very few vehicles that have this much capability, and can still park it in a standard garage.
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Old 10-20-2014, 04:51 PM   #49
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The max tow rating is almost always with a wd hitch. It's usually lower without.


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Old 10-20-2014, 10:30 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by falcnjet View Post
Thanks raspivey. I think I'm getting to the point where I understand. What the TV specs call "Max. Tongue Wt." is the vertical weight limit on the receiver (720#). And I assume that what the TT specs call "Dry wt., hitch" is the vertical weight the empty trailer puts on the hitch ball (740#). Since the hitch rests in the receiver, I assume that puts me over the tongue wt. limit.

What I'm really trying to find out, and what the sales person is trying to convince me of, is whether it's true that when the wt. distribution components are all hooked up, enough weight is transferred off the receiver to the frame to keep me from exceeding the tongue weight limit. I can't find this discussed anywhere and of course I don't want to just trust the salesman.

All other weight limits won't be exceeded. I'm not trying to tow a trailer heavier than the limits of the TV or anything like that. MCWR or the TV's max gross weight and axle weights are not being exceeded. It's just the tongue weight limit that's at issue.

Thanks again.
I was in a similar situation when deciding on my trailer. Since I was serious about getting the trailer I wanted, I traded in for an appropriate TV, a 3/4 ton truck, instead of going a few hundred pounds outside the boundaries of my Jeep Commander.

I was taught to calculate based on the tongue rating already accounting for a WDH. Seeing as how you're going off the "dry" tongue weight, and it's already over, I wouldn't do it. I'm guessing you're in an SUV due to the modest tongue weight limit so it might be worth trading up for a truck.

A rule of thumb I've learned to get the trailer's loaded tongue weight is to calculate 13% of the GVWR, which is approximately what you'll have over the hitch if your trailer is loaded and balanced appropriately. You'll probably find its closer to 900 loaded, which far exceeds your TV tongue weight. Also important to remember that the weight is going somewhere, and you also must account for the max cargo rating of your TV. The manufacturers spec usually only assumes there's a 150lb driver in the vehicle, but I'm guessing you might want to load it up with some gear, friends and family, which will cut in considerably. So think about that when you're loading 900+ on the hitch.

There are several people in this forum who will tell you that weight limits are arbitrary, a government conspiracy, fake, or not worth following because "the good old days," but personally I like to take the manufacturers word for it and don't mind driving a TV that is appropriate based on manufacturer spec for both the trailer and TV. Others would rather tow a 7,000 lb trailer with a station wagon because grandpappy did it (they also smoked unfiltered cigarettes and didn't use seat belts), so take some of the advice you find here with that context in mind.
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