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Old 04-18-2015, 12:12 AM   #11
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2014 Durango 3.6L with towing package. Rated at 6200 lbs.
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Old 04-18-2015, 08:35 AM   #12
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Yeah, that's a bit much for the V6, but the R/T has the V8 Hemi (7200 lbs).
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Old 04-18-2015, 01:38 PM   #13
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I have a 2011 Durango with the 5.7L hemi and the factory tow package. This is the first year of the new generation Durango's. I tow a Cruise Lite T252RLXL. The weight of my trailer is around 6100 pounds when we are loaded for travel. We very rarely boondock, so I never carry fresh water in my tank and that saves me 500 pounds right there.

Just my swmbo and I in the truck with our dog Clyde. The GVWR on the Durango is rated at 7160 pounds, and we rarely exceed 6000 in it. We do travel fairly light. My tongue weight on the trailer is 600 pounds, so my GVWR on the Durango is still well under the 7160, and the trailer weight of 6100 pounds is also well under the 7400 pound towing capacity of the truck.

The trailer is 31' long, which is a little long for the wheelbase of the truck, but that being said I have experienced very few problems towing it. I have a good WD hitch with dual sway control bars installed. It can feel a little squirrely when being passed by a large truck or in windy conditions, but nothing dangerous.

Overall I am quite happy towing with the Durango. Even towing with the 5.7L we still get decent fuel mileage.

Hope this helps.
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Old 04-18-2015, 01:59 PM   #14
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Wise one once told me that you can TOW a lot (ala the Toyota Tundra towing the space shuttle) - the big problem is STOPPING power....so be wary of towing at the margins, especially wit an SUV
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Old 04-18-2015, 05:04 PM   #15
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I agree with Meep Meep, stopping is important. I am not one of those a-holes you see towing my trailer at 85-90mph on a collision with disaster. Slow and steady, watch what your doing and be aware of your situation. There is always the chance of an accident, but I have had to stop in a hurry a couple of times, and although I probably had to change my britches afterward I was able to get er done.
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Old 04-20-2015, 03:52 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by MeepMeep View Post
Wise one once told me that you can TOW a lot (ala the Toyota Tundra towing the space shuttle) - the big problem is STOPPING power....so be wary of towing at the margins, especially wit an SUV
You can say that about any tow vehicle, even a 1-ton pickup. In all cases, the TV brakes are designed to stop the TV, and the trailer brakes are designed to stop the trailer. Get a good controller like the Tekonsha P2 or P3, in order to take advantage of the full tow ratings.
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Old 04-20-2015, 06:47 PM   #17
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You can say that about any tow vehicle, even a 1-ton pickup. In all cases, the TV brakes are designed to stop the TV, and the trailer brakes are designed to stop the trailer. Get a good controller like the Tekonsha P2 or P3, in order to take advantage of the full tow ratings.
Exactly! The trailer stops the trailer...

As to the Durango, my wife has a 2012 with the 5.7. We've used it to tow our enclosed 25 foot sled trailer weighing close to 5k and the boat we just sold that was 30 foot of boat and trailer weighing around 6k. Both towed like it wasn't back there. We towed the same loads with a Grand Cherokee 5.7 prior to this and can say the Durango feels much more stable in a towing situation. IMHO, it's a fine tow vehicle.
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Old 04-28-2015, 03:48 PM   #18
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You can say that about any tow vehicle, even a 1-ton pickup. In all cases, the TV brakes are designed to stop the TV, and the trailer brakes are designed to stop the trailer. Get a good controller like the Tekonsha P2 or P3, in order to take advantage of the full tow ratings.
I completely agree with the trailer brakes stopping the trailer and the tow vehicle stopping the tow vehicle - until the trailer brakes fail and the tow vehicle has to stop the whole package. It does happen.....why not allow yourself that margin of safety, all things being equal? Just sayin'.....
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Old 04-29-2015, 11:20 AM   #19
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...My tongue weight on the trailer is 600 pounds, so my GVWR on the Durango is still well under the 7160, and the trailer weight of 6100 pounds is also well under the 7400 pound towing capacity of the truck...
...It can feel a little squirrely when being passed by a large truck or in windy conditions, but nothing dangerous...Hope this helps.
With proper TW, and properly set-up WDH, you should not feel squirrelly. I think the wheelbase on my Mounty is shorter than a Durango, and my rig is rock-solid.

I think you feel a bit squirrelly at times because you barely have enough TW (9.8%). Move some things forward, add a 2nd LP tank, etc, to get TW up over 650, and your stability issues should go away completely. You should have at least 700 lbs of TW capacity.

If that doesn't work, be sure you have the WDH set correctly. You want to have the front wheel well height when WDH is engaged to be the same as before the trailer was attached.
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Old 04-29-2015, 11:40 AM   #20
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I completely agree with the trailer brakes stopping the trailer and the tow vehicle stopping the tow vehicle - until the trailer brakes fail and the tow vehicle has to stop the whole package. It does happen.....why not allow yourself that margin of safety, all things being equal? Just sayin'.....
Bringing up arbitrary margins of safety is pointless. Nobody will ever agree on what a good margin is. Fact is, we engineers have already added safety factors into our designs, as well as the test specs we use. The ratings are what the parts and systems have been tested to meet, with safety factors included.

And when it comes to the remote chance of a failed trailer brake system failing:
a. That would not happen without advanced notice. Good controllers have diagnostics to tell you in advance off a problem. If you have a poor ground or a lost connection, you don't leave the house. Some even have audible warnings. Get a problem code, and you pull over and investigate.
b. If you are saying that we must have enough margin to completely protect for a failed brake system, then nobody should tow anything that puts the combined weight greater than the max GVWR of the truck. That would mean my 12,000 GCVWR Mounty could only tow 1400 lbs (6400 GVWR - 5000 curb). Essentially, tow rating = payload capacity. That just not practical, or necessary.

The tow vehicle's brake system could fail, too. That does not mean that we should artificially reduce our GVWR, just in case it happens.
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