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Old 07-05-2014, 08:46 PM   #11
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You Chevy will give you an audible warning if the temp gets to a certain point, the DIC will then instruct you to stop and let the engine idle.
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Old 07-05-2014, 09:22 PM   #12
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That transmission engineer I mentioned will argue this. His teams findings were that the cooler run through the radiator is at a spot in the radiator where the coolant is significantly cooler than the engine temps.... It's at the bottom where the coolant has been as cool as it gets. As a result, there no heating of the transmission fluid from the radiator, ever.
As the former owner/operator of a transmission shop, I believe that you mis-understood your friend. The radiator cooling lines run in the same coolant that the engine runs typically entering at the top of the radiator and exiting at the bottom. In any case, the coolant at the bottom of the radiator after the thermostat opens is never less that about 150 degrees, even on a cool day.

Yes I have cut open radiators that had leaking trans cooler lines to show customers why we had to replace the radiator.

How could that possibly NOT result in heating of the fluid?
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Old 07-05-2014, 10:29 PM   #13
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The truth, as always, is in the middle. Trans coolers are on the output or cold side of the radiator, but still see no less than 150* or so. Yes, your mileage will vary by vehicle and all and I'm sure there's a cooler installed on the inlet or hot side of something.

It's done that way to protect the trans from thermal shock among other things. It makes sure the trans runs under pretty consistent temps no matter what.
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Old 07-05-2014, 10:32 PM   #14
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As the former owner/operator of a transmission shop, I believe that you mis-understood your friend. The radiator cooling lines run in the same coolant that the engine runs typically entering at the top of the radiator and exiting at the bottom. In any case, the coolant at the bottom of the radiator after the thermostat opens is never less that about 150 degrees, even on a cool day.

Yes I have cut open radiators that had leaking trans cooler lines to show customers why we had to replace the radiator.

How could that possibly NOT result in heating of the fluid?
Read the posts from Mark Kovalsky. In his testing for Ford, even in extreme temps, the transmission fluid always was colder coming out of the OTW cooler (radiator cooler) than it was going in.

Larger trans cooler + 3/8" lines, delete radiator cooler or no? - Diesel Forum - TheDieselStop.com

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How do you know that? What measurements have you done? Or are you just assuming that the radiator is hot, so it must heat the ATF?

I will state it again. The radiator cooler NEVER warms the trans fluid. Ever. Period.

I have measured ATF temperatures in and out of the radiator cooler, in ambients as cold as -40įF. I never found a condition where the radiator warmed the ATF. Not even close. The ATF coming out of the radiator cooler was ALWAYS colder than when it went in.
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Old 07-05-2014, 10:53 PM   #15
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I want some of whatever Mark is smoking.
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Old 07-06-2014, 07:33 AM   #16
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Mark retired from Ford in the mid 2000's but I trust anything out of his mouth for trannys built when he was working. Newer Fords may work differently, hard to say. Anything he writes about is Ford only and doesn't apply to other brands.


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Old 07-06-2014, 03:53 PM   #17
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Mark retired from Ford in the mid 2000's but I trust anything out of his mouth for trannys built when he was working.
So what you are expounding is studies that have been done maybe 20, 30 or more years ago. That's about as relevant as a flintlock is to an AR15.

Fluid viscosities have become much thinner, engines run 15, 20 25 degrees hotter, fuel economy considerations have completely changed engineering requirements.

One of the great rules of the internet is that if you keep repeating the same old drivel long enough, it becomes the TRUTH.

Bring me some data from the last 5 years and I will reconsider my position.
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Old 07-06-2014, 07:25 PM   #18
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The mid 2000's includes the tranny in my 2010 F250 so 20-30 years ago is a stretch. Unless you are/were a Ford engineer designing and testing transmissions consider that maybe he knows more than you.


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Old 07-06-2014, 08:32 PM   #19
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The mid 2000's includes the tranny in my 2010 F250 so 20-30 years ago is a stretch. Unless you are/were a Ford engineer designing and testing transmissions consider that maybe he knows more than you.

Ahhh so you KNOW that the test results you keep expounding were done on a 2010 F250...

Hmmm seems quite a stretch for anyone to believe that!
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Old 07-06-2014, 09:06 PM   #20
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Joshuajim , we are still in th early 2000's 2014 is not even 1/4 of he way through. So i'm not sure were you get 20-30 years ago. Since you are not believing an expert can you please tell use how many years you have been designing and testing transmissions.
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