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Old 07-07-2014, 04:15 PM   #31
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You guys just kiss and make up, ok.
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Old 07-07-2014, 04:17 PM   #32
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Is there a full moon?
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Old 07-07-2014, 04:31 PM   #33
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Maximum transmission temperature

In the February 2011 issue of Trailer Life magazine RV Clinic in response from a reader about the maximum transmission temperature allowed in a 2009 Chevy Silverado, the Tech Team had this response.

ďGeneral Motorsí in-house towing team expert provided RV Clinic with this statement: The maximum allowable automatic transmission fluid temperature is dictated by the transmission oil itself. The oil begins to degrade significantly above 270 degrees Fahrenheit, so we design vehicles so that in all but the most extreme conditions, the fluid temperature in the transmission sump stays below 270 degrees F.

We allow for up to 285 degrees F in extreme conditions (i.e. towing a trailer with combination loaded at GCWR in Death Valley). But for customer usage anywhere else in the country, even at GCWR, transmission sump temperature should stay well below 270 degrees F. Above this point, certain internal components, such as seals, begin to disintegrate rather quickly. Although newer synthetic fluids can withstand higher temperatures we still recommend this (270F) as a maximum temperature.
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:06 PM   #34
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OK, for you regurgitating nay-sayers, I did my own test on a 2013 F150. Attached is a flow diagram for this truck so that the filming sequence makes sense. I will admit that since I had my transmission shop, engineering has changed. The output from the trans enters the BOTTOM of the radiator first, exits the top and then goes to the aux cooler.

As you can see, the temperature coming OUT of the radiator is hotter than the temperature entering. I did my first video after about a 10 minute drive and the out temperatures were about 10 degrees higher than my final video which occurred after the radiator cooled during the 15 minutes it took to do 3 videos.

So the bottom line is that while 20 to 30 years ago "the temperatures were NEVER higher", modern technology has voided that premise.

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Old 07-08-2014, 04:12 PM   #35
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Have to admit Joshua, that does seem counter-intuitive.
It would be an oxymoron for a transmission "cooler" to make the fluid "hotter;" no?
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:07 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herk7769 View Post
Have to admit Joshua, that does seem counter-intuitive.
It would be an oxymoron for a transmission "cooler" to make the fluid "hotter;" no?
That's what is referred to as dual purpose, in cold weather the engine coolant radiator heats the tranny fluid but under a load when the tranny is working hard and develops it's own heat (above TV thermostat temp) the coolant helps cool it down some.

Of course Toyota does things differently so I'll throw this in the mud pot, my 2013 Tundra tranny fluid does not go through the coolant radiator, it only goes through it's own cooler so yes times change and engineers change how things change, you gotta watch them engineering types there always sc***ng with something.
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:39 PM   #37
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My F250 doesn't put the fluid through the radiator at all either. It doesn't even flow through the tranny cooler until it is at 165 degrees. Then the T-stat opens up to allow a 10% flow into the tranny cooler. At 186.6 degrees the T-stat opens wide and allows a 100% flow. This is what I have read on how it works (from and unnamed person) and it does according to what I have seen. When my Scangauge hits 187, and I'm not pulling up a mountain, the fluid temp starts dropping like a rock usually down to about 173. Then it starts to slowly climb again. I have seen this at least a dozen times.


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Old 07-08-2014, 05:58 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuajim View Post
OK, for you regurgitating nay-sayers, I did my own test on a 2013 F150. Attached is a flow diagram for this truck so that the filming sequence makes sense. I will admit that since I had my transmission shop, engineering has changed. The output from the trans enters the BOTTOM of the radiator first, exits the top and then goes to the aux cooler.

As you can see, the temperature coming OUT of the radiator is hotter than the temperature entering. I did my first video after about a 10 minute drive and the out temperatures were about 10 degrees higher than my final video which occurred after the radiator cooled during the 15 minutes it took to do 3 videos.

So the bottom line is that while 20 to 30 years ago "the temperatures were NEVER higher", modern technology has voided that premise.

QED
Interesting video, how did you get that advertisement in the video.
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Old 07-08-2014, 06:56 PM   #39
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Have to admit Joshua, that does seem counter-intuitive.
It would be an oxymoron for a transmission "cooler" to make the fluid "hotter;" no?
The IBPs I have been looking at calls it a heat exchanger. Makes better sense than trans cooler then.
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