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Old 05-14-2012, 09:51 AM   #81
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Originally Posted by gvanmeter View Post
I have a 2006 F-150, Super Cab 4x4 with 5.4L. My friend has the F-250 with the exact same engine, same tranny, same gears. 3.73.
Why can he pull more- per sticker and charts and graphs?----
I have an 2006, F150, Super Cab, 4x4, 4 speed auto, 5.4L, 3.73 gears, rated to tow 9300 lbs., with a GCWR of 15,000 lbs. My DD and SIL have that very cab/bed configuration and running gear in a 2004 F350. His maximum tow rating is 7100 lbs., with a GCWR of 13,500 lbs. The 2004 F150 stats are the same for my 2006.

Why would a 1 ton truck have lower figures than a 1/2 ton truck ?? I think Ford was encouraging F250 and 350 buyer to go with the V10 and diesel engines. Those are rated at 12,500 and 13,000 tow ratings.

Would I rather pull my 5500 lb. camper with that F350 than my truck....absolutely, even though the safety margin is smaller.

How about a 5th wheel ?? I would not hesitate to pull a 7100 lb. 5th wheel with that F350, but would not hook that puppy up to my F150. Too much stress on the frame and rear axle.
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Old 05-14-2012, 09:56 AM   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hob View Post
Herk,

I wish you hadn't put this line out here, "If your frame can't handle that, it will work harden from flexing and crack." Now Lippert will have another excuse for the reason so many trailer frames they make are cracking and breaking. They don't need any help. They just need to make frames for 5th wheels that hold up.

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This is not "new news" if you have ever unfolded a paperclip and started flexing it (even a little though that will take longer) eventually, somewhere along the wire, the flexing will get the metal hard enough to snap.

You will get no warning. One second everything is just fine and the next you will have two pieces of wire in your hands.

The idea is to use just enough of and alloy of metal for the intended use of that model of vehicle (or camper). How much and what kind of metal determines how much flexing for a given weight and condition before failure.

Repetitions (flexes) also matter as well. Overloaded will require many less flexes before failure; at proper gross weight, the number of trips at that weight is the planned life span.

When a truck manufacturer tests a truck's frame they test it to failure.
They put it in a big bending jig and stress it at it's planned operating weight for a number of repetitions or until it fails.

If it lasts the planned operational life; they stamp that Frame Weight Rating on the drawing and the design is approved for manufacture.

You exceed GVWR at the expense of longevity and safety.
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Old 05-14-2012, 10:20 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by TTNewbees View Post
Think herk is referring to TV frame, not trailer...... How does a TV frame affect a lippert trailer from? But like my name say I am green.
If you ever look at the pinbox on an Ultralight camper while on an uneven road that connection between the pinbox and the frame overhang moves around quite a bit.

If you are a typical camper you most likely have nothing to fear. If you overload the camper frequently or spend a lot of time on back roads, you might consider a thorough weld and frame inspection where the 5th wheel hitch connects to the frame every three years or so.
Just my opinion though.

An over stressed flex failure to the camper looks like this.
Note everything around it looks just fine.

A pickup's frame failure will look similar.
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