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Old 06-18-2013, 12:02 AM   #11
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I used to haul a steel 2 horse bumper pull. It was thoroughbred size and no dressing room. It had a gvwr of 5000 lbs so very similar to yours. I towed it with a ford ranger, dodge Durango and eventually a Nissan armada. I usually only had 1 horse but sometimes 2 in it. I didn't have any issues towing it. The only time I would get even a little sway was if my horse got lazy and literally sat on the butt bar. I never used wdh or.sway control. I very rarely ever saw a 2 horse trailer with it. The ones that did had a dressing room. You can try asking on a horse forum if you want. The one I know of is NC Horse News - Part 1. They have a section called the square you can try.

Another option and perhaps the best one is to go weigh everything. Load your truck and trailer up (with horses) and go weigh it at a local scale. You want a weight of the truck without the trailer hooked up (weigh each truck axle individually) and a weight hooked up(trailer on one pad and each truck axle individually). This is a little trickier for you as you can't unhook a trailer with horses in it. It will require 2 trips for you. Make sure you have a full tank of fuel both times. How much weight has been off loaded from the fro.t axle and onto the rear axle? This will also give you an idea of how much weight the trailer is adding to the truck. The best way to determine your tongue weight is a sherline scale but they are not cheap. Once you have an idea of your tongue weight then you can better proceed. Things to know are what is your hitch rated for (both load bearing and eith wdh). This should be stamped on your hitch somewhere. Also what is recommended by your tv manufacturer for that weight ? If you need a wdh, a good one is Reese dual cam bu. t not sure what size barsyou will need or how low that hitch goes. As for being concerned about hooking up. Your barn muscles can handle it. The hitch head is about 50 lbs. The easy way to snap up bars is to use the tongue Jack to raise the trailer up thereby raising the rear of the truck up and releasing the pressure. I can hand close mine doing this. You will get it. Oh and 1 more thing, make sure you have a good transmission cooler on the truck. I destroyed my Durango towing without one. Good luck.
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Old 06-21-2013, 03:37 PM   #12
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You seem to be asking about what WDH to get, but also stating that you are willing to accept less than 10% TW on the ball. While a friction sway controller (or the friction sway control from an Equil-i-zer, or the cam system of a dual-cam) will help control sway, you will still feel it, and more importantly, your horse(s) will feel it. Do horses get nausea? Probably.

The fact is that you need to get 10% on the ball to be stable. I hear you saying that most horse owners don't do that, just like most horse trailers don't have power-jacks, etc, etc. But you are not most people. You don't have a 3/4-ton truck, and you don't have a gooseneck. Not having a lot of weight behind the axles is not what helps against sway. You need more TW.

You have room in that front cargo area. You should use that area, and simply secure the load properly so your animals are not in danger. I used to have a popup camper with a front storage truck. These were designed tongue-light, under the assumption that the trunk would actually be used. Otherwise, the rig would not be stable. You have the same situation.

I'm not trying to be a jerk. Please take this as my honest recommendation to you, both for your safety, and for the comfort of your horse(s).

Good luck!
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Old 06-22-2013, 12:12 PM   #13
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The Andersen hitch is probably your best solution.

Two way sway control built into the ball mount. No bars to snap up. No holes to drill. No parts to grease. No sway brace to remove when backing up. Hitch head (with ball), shank, chains, trailer brackets, and hardware come in a box that weighs 60 lbs. It's lite weight, quiet, and cleaner than any other WD hitch.

Andersen hitch is a little soft on weight distribution for a heavy (800+ lbs) tongue weight, but, you don't have a really heavy tongue.
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Old 06-22-2013, 12:41 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrakeman View Post
You seem to be asking about what WDH to get, but also stating that you are willing to accept less than 10% TW on the ball. While a friction sway controller (or the friction sway control from an Equil-i-zer, or the cam system of a dual-cam) will help control sway, you will still feel it, and more importantly, your horse(s) will feel it. Do horses get nausea? Probably.

The fact is that you need to get 10% on the ball to be stable. I hear you saying that most horse owners don't do that, just like most horse trailers don't have power-jacks, etc, etc. But you are not most people. You don't have a 3/4-ton truck, and you don't have a gooseneck. Not having a lot of weight behind the axles is not what helps against sway. You need more TW.

You have room in that front cargo area. You should use that area, and simply secure the load properly so your animals are not in danger. I used to have a popup camper with a front storage truck. These were designed tongue-light, under the assumption that the trunk would actually be used. Otherwise, the rig would not be stable. You have the same situation.

I'm not trying to be a jerk. Please take this as my honest recommendation to you, both for your safety, and for the comfort of your horse(s).

Good luck!
I just don't think they need the 10% because there is nothing behind the wheels. That is just my opinion and nothing scientific. Look up horse trailers and see.
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Old 06-22-2013, 02:41 PM   #15
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You do not need to put something in front of the horse. Horse trailers are designed differently then camping trailers and therefore designed to have a different tongue weight than that of camping trailers. I really think you will get better more appropriate answers from a horse forum.
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