Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-15-2019, 08:50 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 8
WDH &/vs Sway bars

It's been a few years since I've towed, and I am not super savvy on concept to begin with - so I asked the dealer and left even more confused.

TV - 2017 Santa Fe with 5000 capacity (have to check the tongue weight limits before I buy anything)
Geopro 16BH - my desired camper

So - I was confused about the WDH and have learned that it is the part connected to the trailer (as opposed to part of the harness bolted to the vehicle), ok good. Dealer describing WDH and how it looks/connects etc and I ask about sway bars - he tells me, No, with this camper and set up you don't want sway bars.... WHAT???? My questions:

1. Can you have both WDH & Sway bars
2. Is there ever a scenario where you wouldn't want sway bars
__________________

LeonineThor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 08:58 AM   #2
Rookie
 
Mrprovy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Selden, NY
Posts: 179
I'm brand new to towing TT's and don't know much about the topic. But, after researching a few different options for the same TT with my '06 Chevy Trailblazer (I6, truck frame), I decided I'm going to use the Andersen WDH (which claims anti-sway). I'll be picking up my 16BH on 10/12 and driving it 10-12 hours home; I'll post up how the drive goes with this hitch.
__________________

__________________
2006 Chevy Trailblazer
2020 Geo Pro 16BHG (soon)
Mrprovy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 09:33 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
007matman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 1,510
A Santa Fe has a pretty short wheelbase. I'd add one.

The only time you would need to be concerned about disconnecting would be if you have one of the friction type andi-sway devices that are sold along with a traditional chain style WDH. With those you'll need to disconnect them when reversing.

If it were me buying a new hitch I'd go with one of the Trunion style hitches with integraded sway control.

Fastway E2, Equal-i-zer 4-way, Andersen (even though it's not a trunnion-style hitch) would work well for your application.
007matman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 09:36 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
GalsofEscape's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Catonsville Maryland
Posts: 1,454
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeonineThor View Post

My questions:

1. Can you have both WDH & Sway bars
2. Is there ever a scenario where you wouldn't want sway bars

my WDH has antisway built in - so no need for separate antisway bars. I use the 4 point equalizer.
__________________
HTT: "EscapeII" 2016 Shamrock 23WS (current)
PUP: "Escape" 2010 Rockwood HW 277 (gone)
TV: "Bruce" 2011 Dodge Durango V8 Hemi Crew
Just us gals (me, Sis and our daughters)
We spend alot of money to go sit in the woods
GalsofEscape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 09:48 AM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by 007matman View Post
A Santa Fe has a pretty short wheelbase. I'd add one.
Thank you for your response - please clarify what you would add? the sway bars along with a WDH?

I see I may have the option of one system containing both.
LeonineThor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 09:50 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
SeaDog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,023
WDH and Sway control are two different subjects. You can tow with or without either. the advantage of the WDH is you can transfer some of the lounge weight to the front axle of the tow rig. the sway system is for controlling sway some rigs need it some don't not all trailers sway when going down the road.

Answers. Yes you can have both I use both on my rig. I have no sway control on my car hauler no need for it.
__________________
Retired Navy
Jake my sidekick (yellow Lab)
2017 RAM 2500 CC 4X4 Cummins Diesel
2016 Flagstaff 26 FKWS
AF&AM & El Korah Shrine of Idaho
SeaDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 09:58 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
007matman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 1,510
I'd go with one that has the sway control built in. I mentioned a few.
007matman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 10:00 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Hills of Northwestern PA
Posts: 696
Many WDH today have anti-sway engineered in and do not need a separate anti-sway bar. Old style friction adjustable anti-sway bars need to be disconnected when backing on tight turns to prevent damage. New WDH with built in anti-sway do not. My Husky Centerline TS is the modern type where the load bars also have anti-sway. That are solid bars that ride on a TT frame bracket.
You definitely need a WDH with that tow vehicle. Both for a smoother ride and anti-sway. Don't want the tail wagging the dog, it's downright dangerous.
My initial tow vehicle for my 4K# TT was a 2008 Ford Explorer with factory tow package. It NEEDED a WDH. HUGE improvement in towing. Made the rig feel like one long solid vehicle. Still using the same WDH with my new F150 although it isn't required. It still smooths out the towing ride feel but the anti-sway effect when towing with side winds is my main reason to continue using the WDH.
__________________
2019 Cherokee Wolf Pup 16BHS
2019 Ford F-150 S-Crew 5.5 bed V8 w/tow package
Husky Centerline TS WDH 400-600# spring bars
2018 16 days camped, 2019 9 days so far.
Boomerweps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 10:25 AM   #9
Sham183
 
mopwr4me2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 611
YouTube is your friend!

On another note with your vehicle I would use a WDH you Probably have a 500# max tongue weight. with the TT you have chose you will probably be pretty close to your max or maybe even over your max tongue weight. You also have other weights to consider as well so Just something to keep in mind.

Most WDH now have everything integrated into them. Look into ones like Blue Ox sway pro which I have or equalizer, Anderson, husky and many other brands out there. Google them and do some research on how they work. Most manufacturers have videos and explain very well how their hitch works. You will get tons of different opinions on which brand to go with on here so just be aware. Everyone has the one they like best. Just make sure you know your numbers for both TV and TT and get the hitch that fits your combo. Hope this helps a little.
mopwr4me2003 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 01:14 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
SailorSam20500's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 2,691
My understanding is a bit different from a couple of the prior posts.


WDH. The reason for this capability is to return load to the TV front wheels. When hitching up, weight is only added to the rear axle, possibly overloading it. Additionally you are removing load from the front wheels. Reduced load up front can severely impact steer-ability and braking. Realize that well over half of your stopping power is in the front brakes, if the wheels aren't solidly on the ground they will slide. WDHs return load to the front axle and wheels reducing load on the rear axle. Additionally, some of the load is redirected to the trailer axle(s).


Sway management is in two categories. Sway control and sway elimination. For reasons related to physics and geometry, sway elimination is available only with a Propride or Hensley hitch. Main downside to these to hitches is their price. They work by moving the pivot point of the rig close to the TV rear axle. Physics states that a rig with apivot at or very close to the rear axle cannot sway.

Sway control hitches come in two types, integrated and add-on. The trunion style and those with a separate friction bar. Both styles use friction in one form or another to dissipate sway energy. There are many folks who state they have never experienced sway with these hitches. I believe that they have but it has been at a low enough level such that they didn't really feel it in the TV. It is interesting to read posts from people who have used both types.

The big three hitches seem to be priced about $800 and have many happy users. Friction bars absorb the sway be forcing two metal surfaces to slide past each other. This can cause a significant amount of noise. Also some of these hitches require disconnection of the friction points before backing up when turning. Otherwise you may bend the friction bars destroying them.
Which hitch is "best" for you depends on your ranking of price, convenience, and tolerance of sway. It seems to me that the various hitches in each category only have minor differences and within the category, all will perform very close to equally.
__________________
Al
Save the Earth. Itís the only known planet with Beer.
S.E. Mich.
Flagstaff 26FKWS / 2019 F-150 3.5 EcoBoost SCrew
SailorSam20500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 04:01 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
rlh1957's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Southeast
Posts: 1,047
WDH Weight Distribution and Anti Sway are two different animals, but most often combined in one device.
WD helps distribute more of the trailer weight off of just the tongue and rear tow vehicle axle and move it forward... better control, tire wear, better ride. Towing Over 5000 lbs. is always recommended to have a WDH, Weight Distribution Hitch. The Anti Sway system can be incorporated as part of the hitch or using bars as well. Lots of you tube videos on all of the WDH/Anti-Sway systems. Everyone has their opinion, experiences and favorites. Some have had experience with more that one type. Cost is between $600 to around $2000.
My opinion is do your research and Don't tow without something in place.
__________________
2018 Forest River Rockwood Roo
24WS

2019 Ford SD F-350 SRW Lariat
Tow & Gooseneck Prep
FX4 Off Road (4X4)
rlh1957 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 07:11 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Villagerjjm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 400
Equalizer hitches are 4 point anti sway and load equalizing. E2 Equalizer hitches are 2 point anti sway and load distributing.
Villagerjjm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2019, 07:17 AM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 39
Seriously look at the Andersen hitch. It's lightweight, simple to install/hookup/unhook. It does weight distribution and sway without the bulky bars and extra sway control to hookup. And for a smaller trailer, it will work very well. And the price is very competitive.
jboczek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2019, 01:00 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Northern CA
Posts: 362
In response to 007Matman's comment, I have used friction type anti sway devises since 1974. I have never disconnected it when backing up. That's a fallacy. Also, even thought my truck has anti sway equipment built in, I still use the friction device, They work fine together, My trailer is a 32' Wildwood right now.
JimMorrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2019, 01:25 PM   #15
Site Team
 
dcheatwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,096
Some modern weight distribution hitches have sway control function without adding the anti sway bars.
__________________
2018 Forester 3011 DS

dcheatwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2019, 01:27 PM   #16
Site Team
 
dcheatwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,096
Well worded
Quote:
Originally Posted by SailorSam20500 View Post
My understanding is a bit different from a couple of the prior posts.


WDH. The reason for this capability is to return load to the TV front wheels. When hitching up, weight is only added to the rear axle, possibly overloading it. Additionally you are removing load from the front wheels. Reduced load up front can severely impact steer-ability and braking. Realize that well over half of your stopping power is in the front brakes, if the wheels aren't solidly on the ground they will slide. WDHs return load to the front axle and wheels reducing load on the rear axle. Additionally, some of the load is redirected to the trailer axle(s).


Sway management is in two categories. Sway control and sway elimination. For reasons related to physics and geometry, sway elimination is available only with a Propride or Hensley hitch. Main downside to these to hitches is their price. They work by moving the pivot point of the rig close to the TV rear axle. Physics states that a rig with apivot at or very close to the rear axle cannot sway.

Sway control hitches come in two types, integrated and add-on. The trunion style and those with a separate friction bar. Both styles use friction in one form or another to dissipate sway energy. There are many folks who state they have never experienced sway with these hitches. I believe that they have but it has been at a low enough level such that they didn't really feel it in the TV. It is interesting to read posts from people who have used both types.

The big three hitches seem to be priced about $800 and have many happy users. Friction bars absorb the sway be forcing two metal surfaces to slide past each other. This can cause a significant amount of noise. Also some of these hitches require disconnection of the friction points before backing up when turning. Otherwise you may bend the friction bars destroying them.
Which hitch is "best" for you depends on your ranking of price, convenience, and tolerance of sway. It seems to me that the various hitches in each category only have minor differences and within the category, all will perform very close to equally.
__________________
2018 Forester 3011 DS

dcheatwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2019, 02:09 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 348
I have never disconnected my friction bar away control when backing. I also don't jack knife my trailer when backing.
I run a husky WDH and sway bar.
MtBiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2019, 10:55 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 794
SailorSam 20500 speaks the truth. We have towed nearly everything from a "baby" pop-up, tent trailer to a luxury fifth-wheel; and weight distribution and anti-sway have been a part of every rig set-up we have ever had, for more than 45 years. We have had great success with the Equalizer, 4-point WDH with built-in anti-sway bars. Easy to install and calibrate for the weight of your trailer and capability of your Tow Vehicle. On an earlier, lighter weight TT, we previously used a WDH hitch with a separate anti-sway damper. Both gave us good service, but the separate anti-sway damper had to be removed when backing into tight spaces. Not so with the Equalizer.

Anti-sway would be significantly more important if your TT is a single-axle unit. Dual Axle TT's are less prone to sway problems than smaller, single axle units, especially when 18-wheelers pass you at 75 MPH.
Jakie-Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2019, 09:08 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 8
Thank you all!

Thank you all for the input. I appreciate the specific names/brands being mentioned, and I have been watching YouTube like a crazy lady. I certainly feel like I'll be able to have an informed conversation when I get serious about making a purchase.
LeonineThor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2019, 06:07 PM   #20
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Western WA
Posts: 4
Using WDH on Unibody

I've heard from several people in the towing industry that using a WDH on a unibody vehicle is NOT recommended. Anyone have any thoughts on that? Looking to tow my new trailer with a 2016 Jeep Cherokee with factory towing package and it's a unibody.
__________________

JrJordan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
sway

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:54 AM.


×