Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-18-2018, 10:27 PM   #31
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 76
Iím surprised no one recommend a Hensley arrow or pro pride 3 hitch. They are way more pricey than regular wdh / sway hitches but far superior because they eliminate sway before it can begin unlike sway control types. The wdh is also built in and use screw jacks which are as simple as it gets. I think most people donít even know they exist. I didnít until I had a few close calls then decided to do some serious research to figure out sway. Imagine not even knowing a semi is passing you at 75mph, serious cross winds do nothing and not having to stress about having a heavy load at the back of your trailer( like my toy hauler). Anyways check them out

https://www.hensleymfg.com/

https://www.propridehitch.com/

I have the Hensley but the propride is just as good in my opinion. Others wdhís will probably do the job but for me it was a no brainer and I canít put a price on my familyís safety. And I donít have any affiliation with them, just an owner.
__________________

deepseadan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2018, 07:26 AM   #32
Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by emaruu View Post
At the CAT scales I learned that my Andersen WDH was able to get me back to 20 pounds from my unloaded front axles. I was convinced then and it was new to me. Having gone a couple thousand miles with it in the past month, I'm even more convinced I picked the right one. I'm pulling a Roo 21SS with a Jeep Grand Cherokee V8 w/tow pkg. Cross winds still are a booger, but without a 20mph from my starboard side I pull straight. It's easy to hook up and I carry the hitch one-handed.
Im new to towing a TT but did buy the Andersen. Im pulling GeoPro 19fbs with a f150 Screw. Loaded TT is close to 4000 with tounge around 700-750. (Dual tanks and batteries, plus hitch mounted bike rack). Ill second or likely 5th by now that the Andersen does a good job with overall TT management. Only thing i experience with passing trucks is a slight nudge as the bow wave of air passes by, but never any distinct reaction from the TT. As set up, my truck rear is approx 1.5" lower than unloaded, front is no more than 1/4" higher than unloaded (truck sits level) and the TT is abt 1" nose down over its 20ft length. I've towed over 2k miles at this point and all handles nicely. What I'm never sure of however is just how tight to adjust the chain tension. Im typically 5-6 visible threads behind the nuts which is typically 2-3 threads beyond hand tight. Adj like that, the chains are rigid. I could like stand on one with little deflection. Not sure if this is the optimal adjustment, but it seems to work. How did you figure out what was right for you? Are you using more or less tension?
__________________

lamokadave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2018, 07:54 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
marinerjoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Posts: 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by lamokadave View Post
How did you figure out what was right for you? Are you using more or less tension?

I tightened mine until the truck and trailer were level, or pretty darn close. Saying Iíve got 9 threads showing is immaterial because my brackets are likely a different distance from the ball than yours. I get next to no deflection on my chains.

Joe
__________________
Joe
Current: 2018 Flagstaff MicroLite 21FBRS
Past: 2005 Flagstaff Classic 625D
TV: 2016 Ford F-150 3.5 EcoBoost

marinerjoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2018, 08:04 AM   #34
Junior Member
 
emaruu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Elk River, MN
Posts: 13
Agreed about thread count differences. I went to a scale and actually adjusted between weighs a few times. Relatively inexpensive way to KNOW my weight and distribution effect. And, as my son would say about hand-tight: whose hand? But I use the tongue jack to lift, do my threads, then lower it back down. I rarely get out the tools now.

My advice for ANY weight distribution hitch is to go to a scale that isn't busy and pay for a few re-weighs. It's entertaining as well as educational.
Quote:
Originally Posted by marinerjoe View Post
I tightened mine until the truck and trailer were level, or pretty darn close. Saying Iíve got 9 threads showing is immaterial because my brackets are likely a different distance from the ball than yours. I get next to no deflection on my chains.

Joe
__________________
2016 Roo 21SS | 2011 Jeep GC Overland V8
Stuff: Andersen WDH, Furrion ObsCam, SurgeGuard 34930
On the way: WeBoost RV, WiFi Booster, more outlets, adventures
Previous: 2002 Starcraft Constellation Orion (pop-up) pulled by 2008 Honda Odyssey; many tents
emaruu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2018, 02:30 PM   #35
Rockwood Mini Lite 1902
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2
We have a 1902 Mini Lite towed by a Ridgeline. We used to have a chain style WDH with a friction anti-sway bar, but still had noticeable sway when we met big trucks. We just switched to an Equ-i-lizer 4-way and have absolutely no problems with sway. Our dealership’s (it actually sells Anderson) mechanic told us that Equ-i-lizer 4-way is the Cadillac and that the Anderson design is proven prone.
__________________
Have a great day!
Bill
-----
Rockwood Mini Lite 1902
Honda Ridgeline
Alberta, Canada
wicook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2018, 08:50 AM   #36
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 13
I have been using Andersen WD for several years now and find it the best solution. I live in Texas so wind is always a factor along with 80 miles-an-hour Interstate. I have no issue with crosswinds or big trucks blasting past me. By far Andersen is the easiest setup and takedown WD.
wylie31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2018, 01:54 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
thebrakeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canton, Michigan
Posts: 1,266
For a 1/2-ton truck, I'd want a WDH when TW exceeds 500 lbs. Your owner's manual will probably tell you when it's recommended and/or required. WDH is needed when there is enough TW, such that the OEM/owner should be concerned about the amount of weight being removed from the front wheels.


A small hybrid like that will only weigh about 800 lbs over dry weight, so around 4450 lbs. 12.5% of that should be on the ball, or 556 lbs (could be more or less).


Your need for a WDH is borderline. Would you benefit from it? Sure. And if you get something that has integrated sway control, all the better. In fact, if you don't get a WDH, I would recommend a $50 friction sway controller from Harbor Freight.
__________________
thebrakeman ('70), DW ('71), DD ('99), DD ('01), DD ('05)
2004 Surveyor SV261T (UltraLite Bunkhouse Hybrid)
2006 Mercury Mountaineer V8 AWD Premier
Equal-i-zer WDH (10k), Prodigy Brake Controller
thebrakeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2018, 07:56 PM   #38
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 7
Eqal-i-zer!

I currently have an F150 pulling a 24' hybrid. I have pulled 4 trailers with my Equalizer WD hitch from 24' to 34'. Once set up properly, you won't know the camper is there (except in high winds of course). Don't let the dealer set it up for you, they have never done it right fro me. Call Equalizer's tech support. They are fantastic. They will stay on the phone with you as long as it takes.
__________________

MentallyRetired is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
first time, hitch, weight, weight distribution hitch

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Forest River, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:40 AM.