Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-13-2015, 08:07 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
wbdavey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Oswego, NY
Posts: 287
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilcin View Post
I am sorry, I am confused about how you determined the hitch weight.

If I were to go back to the scales with just my tow vehicle and weigh it once, front axle weighs 4000lbs and rear axle weighs 4000lbs. Now I weigh it again only this time I put a cargo basket that is attached to my hitch receiver and put 500lbs of rock in it. Now, wouldn't I simply subtract 1st pass from the 2nd pass to determine how much weight went to each axle?
Isn't this why we weigh with the spring bars and then without the spring boards????
Bilchin - in your example with the cargo basket and 500 lbs of rocks you would probably find less weight on the front axles and more than 500 lbs added to the rear. But in this example you know what the rear axle weight is with nothing in the basket (that's the truck alone weight). Neither of your first two passes across the scale give you that info. You have to weigh the truck alone.
__________________

__________________
2015 Rockwood Ultra Lite 2604 WS. Rear LR, large street side slide with small wardrobe slide in BR.
2014 Ram 1500 Eco Diesel Laramie Quad Cab.
wbdavey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 08:08 PM   #22
Canadian Member
 
itat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Eastern GTA, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,899
Yes, you would take the difference between the 2 passes. But you'll note that both passes are without the bars in place i.e. no weight distribution effect. When you put the WDH bars in place it takes some of the tongue weight off the truck and transfers it to the trailer. It also redistributes some tongue weight to the front axle of the TV.
__________________

__________________
2011 Rockwood Signature Ultra Lite 8293SS, 12K Equal-i-zer WDH
2016 Ford F-250 XLT SuperCrew, 6.2L, 4x4, 6'9" bed, 3.73, w/ snow plow & camper pkgs.
2010 Rockwood Roo 23SS (2012 - 2014)
2009 Ford F-150 XLT SuperCrew, 5.4L, 5'6" bed (2012 - 2016)

itat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 08:18 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Bilcin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Philadelphia PA
Posts: 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by itat View Post
Yes, you would take the difference between the 2 passes. But you'll note that both passes are without the bars in place i.e. no weight distribution effect. When you put the WDH bars in place it takes some of the tongue weight off the truck and transfers it to the trailer. It also redistributes some tongue weight to the front axle of the TV.
Ok, think I got it.......I was confusing the tongue weight with the spring bars on as that being the weight in the rear axle of the TV, instead, the tongue weight with the spring bars on is distributed over both vehicles and when we weigh both with the spring bars it shows where the tongue weight is distributed? Right????
__________________
Bill & Cindy McKenna
Philadelphia PA
2015 Palomino Puma 32DBKS
2005 Ford Excursion 6 liter Turbo Diesel
Bilcin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 08:25 PM   #24
Canadian Member
 
itat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Eastern GTA, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,899
I think you've got it now. Doing the 3 passes as you did, you can calculate everything you want to know. Ependydad's website does the same thing as my spreadsheet.
__________________
2011 Rockwood Signature Ultra Lite 8293SS, 12K Equal-i-zer WDH
2016 Ford F-250 XLT SuperCrew, 6.2L, 4x4, 6'9" bed, 3.73, w/ snow plow & camper pkgs.
2010 Rockwood Roo 23SS (2012 - 2014)
2009 Ford F-150 XLT SuperCrew, 5.4L, 5'6" bed (2012 - 2016)

itat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 08:31 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Bilcin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Philadelphia PA
Posts: 385
Quote:
Originally Posted by itat View Post
I think you've got it now. Doing the 3 passes as you did, you can calculate everything you want to know. Ependydad's website does the same thing as my spreadsheet.
Thanks, everyone on here YOU ROCK!!!!!
__________________
Bill & Cindy McKenna
Philadelphia PA
2015 Palomino Puma 32DBKS
2005 Ford Excursion 6 liter Turbo Diesel
Bilcin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 08:35 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Bilcin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Philadelphia PA
Posts: 385
Spoke to soon.
Once you get the tongue weight, the only way to change it is adding or removing weight off of the trailer. Meaning, adjusting the WDH will only transfer the weight not lighten the tongue weight. Correct?
__________________
Bill & Cindy McKenna
Philadelphia PA
2015 Palomino Puma 32DBKS
2005 Ford Excursion 6 liter Turbo Diesel
Bilcin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2015, 08:37 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by ependydad View Post
My site should help you with the math:
Towing Planner - towing capability calculators

Thanks................very nice...........but I'm still right at the top cause of my payload!!!!!
__________________
2016 Rockwood ROO 233S


2013 Ford F150 3.5 ECO SCREW
TT233S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2015, 12:42 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Alabama
Posts: 189
Bilcin,

You are correct. Tongue weight does not change without physically rearranging cargo in the trailer or removing items forward of the trailer axles, especially near the tongue. You still have that tongue weight on the hitch regardless of how it's distributed. Think of it this way, the hitch is the central collection point for all the tongue weight so it then re-distributes it across the fulcrum. The tongue weight is still on the hitch. You also have to calculate your spring bars and hitch into the equation as well as anything in the bed of the truck behind the drive axle as hitch weight. The sum of this equation is compared to the gross tongue hitch rating, which is 1100 lbs in this case.

This is why many half ton haulers such as myself have to be limited on carrying cargo in the bed of the truck, because of the maximum tongue weight rating. My oem hitch max is 500 lbs without wd or 1050 lbs with wd. My tongue weighs 940 lbs and my hitch components weigh 95. The sum of that equals 1035 lbs. Now add another 15 lbs of gear in the bed behind the drive axle and my hitch weight comes to 1050 lbs. It's at the max even though it gets distributed. I cannot change this number by reconfiguring the hitch or spring bar tension.

Hope this explanation helps explain the concept of hitch weight and tongue weight. The very best measurement of calculating tongue weight is to use a scale directly on the tongue at the towing height of the coupler, either level or slightly pitch down. Of course on level ground. You can do this in expensively with a bathroom scale measuring 300 lbs with some boards. This has been explained several times in other posts and you can get very reliable readings on various cargo loading in your trailer. Good luck. Another great resource is equalizer website by progress mfg. Free download on how to properly configure a hitch and concepts of terms.
__________________
2014 Windjammer 3025W Diamond 34.5 ft 8300 lbs.
2010 F150 SC XLT 4x4 5.4L, 3.55 gears 20" rims
12 k Equalizer WDH, Firestone Airbags, HD Bilsteins
TST 507RV TPMS
Zolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2015, 02:16 AM   #29
Senior Member
 
Crockett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 833
I would think items in the bed would be independant of tongue weight and acceptable as long as gvwr was not exceeded.
__________________
Crockett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2015, 09:33 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Alabama
Posts: 189
as I understand the term "tongue weight" it refers to the maximum amount of weight that can be distributed on the hitch and must include cargo behind the drive axle. Even if you do not exceed the GVWR to GAWR or GCWR you can overload the tongue weight rating of a hitch by exceeding this value; All of the reputable companies that I have read about say this has to be factored in. When considering the load on your hitch.....I wish it were different myself.

Consider this excerpt from etrailer:

"A weight-distribution hitch will have two weight ratings - the gross trailer weight and the tongue weight. In choosing a system, therefore, you must determine the following:

Gross Trailer Weight (GTW) refers to the weight of the fully loaded trailer in its actual towing condition.
GTW is measured by placing the fully loaded trailer on a vehicle scale.
Rating of weight-distribution system must match or exceed your GTW.
Tongue Weight (TW) refers to the tongue weight of your trailer and the weight of the cargo that sits behind the rear axle of your vehicle.
Trailer TW is measured using a tongue weight scale
Typically, about 10 to 15 percent of GTW
Weight of cargo behind the rear axle can be measured using a commercial scale
Weigh vehicle without cargo
Weigh vehicle with cargo loaded
Subtract initial weight from weight of loaded vehicle

Tongue Weight (for weight distribution) = trailer tongue weight + vehicle cargo load behind rear axle

The TW rating is the most important factor in determining which size weight-distribution system you should use. If the bars of the system you choose are rated too high for your setup, they will create a rigid ride, which can result in a bouncing trailer. If, on the other hand, the bars are not rated high enough, the system will be unable to properly distribute the weight, rendering it virtually useless." (Etrailer.com)
__________________

__________________
2014 Windjammer 3025W Diamond 34.5 ft 8300 lbs.
2010 F150 SC XLT 4x4 5.4L, 3.55 gears 20" rims
12 k Equalizer WDH, Firestone Airbags, HD Bilsteins
TST 507RV TPMS
Zolin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
scales

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:42 PM.