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Old 04-21-2018, 10:54 AM   #1
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Tire Pressure Change While Driving

So using your TPMS, how much tire pressure change do you see while driving?

Started at 80 psi but driving across FL panhandle pressure got up 96psi and sounded the alarm. How high is too high? Should I worry.

This was on the rear, fronts picked up 5-8psi on my Ford Chassis Forester. BTW Love my TST TPMS.
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Old 04-21-2018, 10:58 AM   #2
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A properly and cold inflated tire can see a pressure increase of 10 - 15 psi but I don't know the conditions like ambient temperature, tire load and rating.
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Old 04-22-2018, 06:08 AM   #3
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I always use the 20% rule. If your cold psi is 80, then over 96 would set off the alarm.
I had the same problem you're having and it turned out that my tire pressure gauge was off from my TPMS. Now I use the TPMS to set the PSI at the beginning of trips and tires stay within 20%.

Did you notice a temp difference as well?
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Old 04-22-2018, 08:22 AM   #4
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Had the same issue last season on our Forester.

I had used the 20% setting since figuring that would be safest.

They only went to the alarm setting so I’ll probably do a couple pounds over the 20% this season.

Temp was up accordingly etc.

Got the alarm and immediately pulled over to check things. All were fine but was a hot day and we had been running down the highway for a while.
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Old 04-22-2018, 12:17 PM   #5
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Living in Las Vegas I always start out with cold tire pressures at 80 psi. I have seen a rise in both temp and psi of more than 20% very regular with ambient air temps if 110-115 deg F. Always concerns me but not sure there is anything I can do about it.
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Old 04-22-2018, 12:56 PM   #6
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Right side tires run cooler than left side tires .
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Old 04-22-2018, 12:57 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wandering View Post
So using your TPMS, how much tire pressure change do you see while driving?

Started at 80 psi but driving across FL panhandle pressure got up 96psi and sounded the alarm. How high is too high? Should I worry.

This was on the rear, fronts picked up 5-8psi on my Ford Chassis Forester. BTW Love my TST TPMS.
I had the same issue with my 5er, but it was sitting still on pavement after being driven with the sun shining on it and the temp about 75 degrees. Once I started driving it cooled down below the set point, but the side towards the sun was 2-3 degrees higher.
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Old 04-22-2018, 01:14 PM   #8
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Same here but I discovered it depended on the sun position.
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Old 04-22-2018, 01:55 PM   #9
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Red face TST warning settings

I just bought a new TST Color monitor and actually read the instruction manual this time. It says set warnings for 10 degrees minus and 20 degrees plus for low and high. But then it goes on to say set warning for 25 degrees plus if driving in a hot weather area. Explains why my system kept going off last summer in Arizona. I'll leave it for 20 dgrees plus for this years trip to Canada maritime providences.
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Old 04-22-2018, 02:37 PM   #10
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Mine does that too. Temperature factory set at 158°. I set all my tires st 80 lb cold. TST shows different PSIs when cold.
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Old 04-22-2018, 05:15 PM   #11
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Do not have TPMS, but a few years ago while replacing 4-tires on fiver at Naples Good Year dealer, the Manager said that in Florida under hot temperatures 'E' tires should never be inflated to 80 cold and prescribed in the 70 to 75 range which is what they set the new tires at in late November. One might think that he was looking for repeat business, but he knew I was just passing through. So I followed his recommendation thereafter without any problem. When in cooler temperatures always went back to the 80 cold level. New fiver has 'G' tires. My understanding that if the tires are inflated with nitrogen then 80 is fine all the time as heat has lesser impact.
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Old 04-22-2018, 06:24 PM   #12
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My first trip with my TST moniter I set my tires cold at 47-48 lbs. The max on my tires is 50 PSI cold. the pressure ran between 5 to 8 lbs above max. the temps also ran about 5-8 degrees above ambient temp.
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Old 04-23-2018, 04:50 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evoprinting View Post
I always use the 20% rule. If your cold psi is 80, then over 96 would set off the alarm.
I had the same problem you're having and it turned out that my tire pressure gauge was off from my TPMS. Now I use the TPMS to set the PSI at the beginning of trips and tires stay within 20%.

Did you notice a temp difference as well?
I had an old mechanical gauge that was inaccurate. Got a $14 digital Tire Pressure Gauge and all was solved.
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Old 04-23-2018, 06:55 AM   #14
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Great Topic,

So I fill my tires to what is recommended on the tire. Tire PSI will increase when driving, this is Normal, I would be alarmed when your tires rise as much as 20% to 25%. Tires are designed to be able to handle this. You will also see when its cold out your PSI will drop when the tires are cold. Typically you do not want to inflate your tires in real cold or real warm. TST sensors will be accurate to within 1-3PSI.

Temperature Tips:
So when your tires are cold the inside temp. should be very close to ambient air temp. Once you start moving, your tires will begin to warm up, this is normal.
Normal operating condition should be approx. 14% to 22% above ambient air temp. when your tires are hot. At TST we pre-set an alarm at 158 degrees. So for example at 100 degrees F. when your tires are hot they should read somewhere between 114 and 122 degrees, which is well below the pre-set alarm at 158 degrees F. Most tires start to reach a catastrophic failure point somewhere between 189 degrees and 214 degrees F. What a lot of people do not realize is approx. 1/3 of tire failures due to heat come from a bearing or hanging brake caliper, these type of conditions can transfer heat from the axle to the tire, causing tire temp to spike and ultimately if not corrected causes the tire to fail.

Feel free to contact me anytime at 210-420-0132 or PM me.

Thanks, and looking forward to seeing many of you at the FROG Rally this year!

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Old 04-23-2018, 09:42 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbenson1234 View Post
Great Topic,

So I fill my tires to what is recommended on the tire. Tire PSI will increase when driving, this is Normal, I would be alarmed when your tires rise as much as 20% to 25%. Tires are designed to be able to handle this. You will also see when its cold out your PSI will drop when the tires are cold. Typically you do not want to inflate your tires in real cold or real warm. TST sensors will be accurate to within 1-3PSI.

Temperature Tips:
So when your tires are cold the inside temp. should be very close to ambient air temp. Once you start moving, your tires will begin to warm up, this is normal.
Normal operating condition should be approx. 14% to 22% above ambient air temp. when your tires are hot. At TST we pre-set an alarm at 158 degrees. So for example at 100 degrees F. when your tires are hot they should read somewhere between 114 and 122 degrees, which is well below the pre-set alarm at 158 degrees F. Most tires start to reach a catastrophic failure point somewhere between 189 degrees and 214 degrees F. What a lot of people do not realize is approx. 1/3 of tire failures due to heat come from a bearing or hanging brake caliper, these type of conditions can transfer heat from the axle to the tire, causing tire temp to spike and ultimately if not corrected causes the tire to fail.

Feel free to contact me anytime at 210-420-0132 or PM me.

Thanks, and looking forward to seeing many of you at the FROG Rally this year!

Thanks,

Mike Benson
210-420-0132
Great Information! This past weekend I left to go camping and my tires were at 80 when I left, pressure rose to 93 on the trip. Monday morning the temps had dropped 30 degrees and my tires were at 75. I left them alone and they rose to 93 on the way home.

Your post validated my decision to leave them alone on Monday.
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Old 04-25-2018, 04:39 PM   #16
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Pressure increase

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wandering View Post
So using your TPMS, how much tire pressure change do you see while driving?

Started at 80 psi but driving across FL panhandle pressure got up 96psi and sounded the alarm. How high is too high? Should I worry.

This was on the rear, fronts picked up 5-8psi on my Ford Chassis Forester. BTW Love my TST TPMS.
The fronts are about right; the rears are showing signs of being over loaded or starting out under inflated
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Old 04-25-2018, 05:47 PM   #17
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Quote:
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So using your TPMS, how much tire pressure change do you see while driving?
I've noticed that my TPMS (Tireminder) goes up about 5-7 degrees once the tires warm up.
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Old 04-26-2018, 08:32 AM   #18
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I had same problem

I live in Florida and the alarm starting going off shortly into first trip on a hot summer day. I called TST (Great Customer Service) and they suggested increasing the high setting. It solved the problem. BTW I always keep my eye on the monitor and all is well. Guess I'm paranoid
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Old 04-26-2018, 01:39 PM   #19
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TST

Good I’m glad we were able to help!

Let us know if there’s anything else we can do to help you.

Thanks,

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hupmat View Post
I live in Florida and the alarm starting going off shortly into first trip on a hot summer day. I called TST (Great Customer Service) and they suggested increasing the high setting. It solved the problem. BTW I always keep my eye on the monitor and all is well. Guess I'm paranoid
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Old 04-26-2018, 01:40 PM   #20
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