Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-16-2016, 08:07 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
Blackrock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: SE Arizona's Gila Vally
Posts: 689
The Bison are carry Brucelosis which can infect the local livestock. I don't remember all the particulars of the disease I just know there was a big push to eradicate it in the beef herds in the 50's ad 60's.
__________________

__________________
2016 RAM 1500 - 2016 Keystone Laredo 265SRK
The road goes on forever and the party never ends.
Blackrock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 08:10 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 6,724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oaklevel View Post
I'm sure you heard about the guy that hit the deer as it crossed the road.............. it was all the deer's fault because the deer did not cross the road at the deer crossing signs..........

Reminds me of the lady who called the state Dept of Transportation and asked them to move the deer crossing sign. She didn't think it was a very good place for the deer to cross, as she'd seen many of them laying by the side of the road.
__________________

__________________
1988 Coleman Sequoia - popup (1987-2009) - outlasted 3 Dodge Grand Caravans!
2012 Roo19 - hybrid (2012-2015)

2016 Mini Lite 2503S - tt (2015 - ???)
2011 Traverse LT, 3.6L, FWD
2009 Silverado 1500 Ext Cab, 5.3L, 4x4, 3.73
2016 Silverado 2500HD Dbl Cab, 6.0L 4x4, 4.10
rockfordroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 08:10 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
RedLdr1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 1,217
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldCoot View Post
Remember, he's a Yankee and they make up their own rules as they go to fit whatever they want.
Well at least he is a very well informed Yankee...

Read these articles and you will know what he is talking about...

Capture, Slaughter of Yellowstone Bison Roil Big Sky Country

And from the NPS:

Why don't you just let the bison roam freely outside Yellowstone National Park?
  • The State of Montana allows some bison to migrate outside Yellowstone National Park and occupy suitable winter range near the park boundary—and tolerance on additional range may occur in the future. However, mass migrations of many hundreds of bison out of the park have, at times, upset state and local governments and many private landowners and cattle operators.
  • If bison were allowed to increase in abundance and disperse unimpeded into cattle-occupied areas of Montana, it is likely those bison would be lethally removed by state employees or during regulated hunts. Also, the state may retract tolerance for bison in Montana in some areas because the agriculture department has superseding management authority due to chronic brucellosis infection in Yellowstone bison.
  • Thus, management practices such as hunting, hazing, capture, and culling are necessary at times to limit the abundance and distribution of bison and allow people (including federal and state managers) time to learn to live with, and manage, bison.
You can read it all Here on the NPS website.


Bottom line is if they leave the park they can be harvested, culled, hunted, whatever you want to call it...
__________________
Wayne and Christine
2018 Sunseeker FT TS2390
Chassis: Ford Transit 350HD, 3.7L Gas, Six speed automatic

RedLdr1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 08:22 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
northstar1960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: in my new 29hfsxlr
Posts: 1,658
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLdr1 View Post
Well at least he is a very well informed Yankee...

Read these articles and you will know what he is talking about...

Capture, Slaughter of Yellowstone Bison Roil Big Sky Country

And from the NPS:

Why don't you just let the bison roam freely outside Yellowstone National Park?
  • The State of Montana allows some bison to migrate outside Yellowstone National Park and occupy suitable winter range near the park boundary—and tolerance on additional range may occur in the future. However, mass migrations of many hundreds of bison out of the park have, at times, upset state and local governments and many private landowners and cattle operators.
  • If bison were allowed to increase in abundance and disperse unimpeded into cattle-occupied areas of Montana, it is likely those bison would be lethally removed by state employees or during regulated hunts. Also, the state may retract tolerance for bison in Montana in some areas because the agriculture department has superseding management authority due to chronic brucellosis infection in Yellowstone bison.
  • Thus, management practices such as hunting, hazing, capture, and culling are necessary at times to limit the abundance and distribution of bison and allow people (including federal and state managers) time to learn to live with, and manage, bison.
You can read it all Here on the NPS website.


Bottom line is if they leave the park they can be harvested, culled, hunted, whatever you want to call it...

That's a far cry from not allowed to leave . yes protected in the park but i know montana has had and wish to have bison hunts outside the park .all good need to keep the population in check the wolves have helped keep bison , elk and deer in check almost to much so . Yellowstone is not the only place with bison you have custer park in south dakota for one
__________________
northstar1960 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 08:25 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
High Country's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Arizona
Posts: 119
#1 injury at the Grand Canyon here in Arizona:

Tourists bitten by squirrels who are trying to feed them.

Because:

Tourists are stupid

The bears don't like the taste of tourists and...

The elk are too busy to pay attention to them.

__________________
High Country is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 08:33 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
RedLdr1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 1,217
Quote:
Originally Posted by northstar1960 View Post
Yellowstone is not the only place with bison you have custer park in south dakota for one
You also have the National Bison Range near Moiese, Montana west of Glacier National Park. It is well worth a visit. For some reason when I lived in Montana they would not allow transfers between it and Yellowstone...
__________________
Wayne and Christine
2018 Sunseeker FT TS2390
Chassis: Ford Transit 350HD, 3.7L Gas, Six speed automatic

RedLdr1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 08:41 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
toslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oakman View Post
Stories like this tick me off. Yellowstone NP reported today that the calf had to be euthanized because the bison herd rejected it.

There are just too many people that have no clue about nature.
the herd didn't reject it, it started coming up to people in cars.

regardless, you can't fix stupid
__________________
haven a blast
toslow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 08:43 PM   #38
Senior Member
 
Wobbles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Southern, IL
Posts: 2,596
Back to the OP's topic of bad human interactions with nature.

IMHO, it's due to the people that came to this land and civilized it. Most of the big predators were wiped out. Consequently, we have a lot of people among us that would not naturally be here.
__________________
Bob & Michelle
2016 Ford F-250 Lariat 4x4
2017 Flagstaff Super Lite 526RLWS
Wobbles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 09:01 PM   #39
Senior Member
 
High Country's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Arizona
Posts: 119
Custer State Park in South Dakota does have a large bison herd, but every year they do a round up of the "excess" animals that are then butchered and the meat sold in the local stores.

Without predators or hunting there is nothing to keep them from over populating the park. If you have ever been through there in the winter and have seen them pushing though several feet of snow to find something to eat you realize that over population would threaten the life of the herd itself.
__________________
High Country is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 07:44 AM   #40
Senior Member
 
Oakman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Jefferson County, MO
Posts: 5,201
Why the calf was put down.

BILLINGS -
Frustration boiled online across the nation over the weekend and into Monday.
How could two tourists possibly think it was okay to pick up a bison calf weighing less than 100 pounds, place it in the back of a Toyota Sequoia, and drive to the ranger station in Yellowstone National Park?
Signs, brochures, common sense usually lends visitors remembering the golden rule in national parks -- "If you care, leave them there."
To recap if you missed it, a father and son thought they were sparing a baby bison from the cold, placed it in the SUV, transported it to the ranger station to inform officials of their good deed.
It's not known how hard the ranger's jaw hit the floor of the station, but the tourists didn't escape without someone taking a photo of the head-scratching situation.
Karen Richardson's photo of the incident took off online, immediately going viral with comments admonishing the tourists from a unidentified country.
On Monday, news came down the bison calf could not be successfully reintroduced to the wild and was subsequently euthanized.
"Interference by people can cause mothers to reject their offspring," YNP officials stated in a press release. "In this case, park rangers tried repeatedly to reunite the newborn bison calf with the herd. These efforts failed. The bison calf was later euthanized because it was abandoned and causing a dangerous situation by continually approaching people and cars along the roadway."
Many still questioned why the bison couldn't be moved to a conservation center or elsewhere.
Montana Fish Wildlife and Park's Communication, Education Director Bob Gibson says there is one big reason that may pose a risk for other wildlife.
"It has first to do with disease," Gibson said. "There are diseases in the park that are not elsewhere that we don't want to move that animal and do that. Even when buffalo are transferred from the park off to the tribes, those animals are vetted for disease a lot first. Just to pick up an animal and go over and plunk it down into another herd is asking for trouble. Second, there is no reason to believe that if that little calf was rejected by its original herd that it would not be rejected by the herd you plugged it into another one of the reservations or somewhere else or a conservation center."
Gibson said it's rare to be able to relocate an animal with hooves. Bears and some birds are exceptions, but even then can be difficult to move.
YNP added: "In order to ship the calf out of the park, it would have had to go through months of quarantine to be monitored for brucellosis. No approved quarantine facilities exist at this time, and we don't have the capacity to care for a calf that's too young to forage on its own. Nor is it the mission of the National Park Service to rescue animals: our goal is to maintain the ecological processes of Yellowstone. Even though humans were involved in this case, it is not uncommon for bison, especially young mothers, to lose or abandon their calves. Those animals typically die of starvation or predation."
None of which would need to be considered if tourists learned the golden rule for wildlife.
We reached out to Yellowstone National Park officials to get a better understanding of the ticket handed out to the tourists.
Since it is a federal crime, the tourists will likely face the park's federal magistrate for further punishment.
__________________

__________________


Bob and Joyce
2013 CC Silverback 29RL
2010 Ford F250 XL Crew Cab 6.4 liter diesel
ATU Local 788
Oakman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:39 AM.