Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-02-2015, 06:55 PM   #31
Mod free 5er
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Concord, NC
Posts: 24,215
Is it not true that the neutral and ground are tied to the same terminal back at the main breaker box?
__________________

__________________
OldCoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2015, 07:15 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Witch Doctor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Clarksville Va.
Posts: 7,625
You are kinda right they are both tied to the box, and you could use a ground for a neutral from a 50 amp breaker and get 110v I wouldn't recommend it. When I did A/C repair and needed 110 V . I had a 110v receptacle with 2 wires and alligator clamps on them I would hook 1 clamp to 1 lug in the disconnect and the other alligator to the box itself that gave me 110 V to use on roof tops for my equipment that I needed that was 110v. Now a day's the code requires a 110 box at the unit also. But yes it would give you 110v. 1 hot leg and a ground. But as the article says the car plug is most likely a welders config. 3 prong and not a 4 prong RV plug. So really I do not know what he's trying to do?
__________________

__________________
Rockwood #8289 WS 2012
F250 6.0 / Husky 16k
With 4 point leveling system
Witch Doctor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 09:04 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
chrisbailey13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 482
My RV breaker looks similar to the one the OP posted in #6, one thing that is missing from his picture is if there is a Neutral Bar in the breaker box that may not be shown in the picture.


if there is it would alleviate a lot of the speculation that the electrician wired the outlet wrong.


__________________
2014 Georgetown XL 352QS
2013-2017 Days Camped-215
chrisbailey13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 09:19 PM   #34
Mod free 5er
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Concord, NC
Posts: 24,215
Quote:
Originally Posted by gljurczyk View Post
You are kinda right they are both tied to the box, and you could use a ground for a neutral from a 50 amp breaker and get 110v I wouldn't recommend it. When I did A/C repair and needed 110 V . I had a 110v receptacle with 2 wires and alligator clamps on them I would hook 1 clamp to 1 lug in the disconnect and the other alligator to the box itself that gave me 110 V to use on roof tops for my equipment that I needed that was 110v. Now a day's the code requires a 110 box at the unit also. But yes it would give you 110v. 1 hot leg and a ground. But as the article says the car plug is most likely a welders config. 3 prong and not a 4 prong RV plug. So really I do not know what he's trying to do?
I've always had welder's and they have all been wired with 2 hot, a neutral and a ground wire on the receptacle itself even tho the plugs only have 3 lugs. Have always used 8-3 with ground.
__________________
OldCoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 09:49 PM   #35
Mod free 5er
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Concord, NC
Posts: 24,215
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisbailey13 View Post
My RV breaker looks similar to the one the OP posted in #6, one thing that is missing from his picture is if there is a Neutral Bar in the breaker box that may not be shown in the picture.


if there is it would alleviate a lot of the speculation that the electrician wired the outlet wrong.
Have seen a lot of home 100A & 200A boxes where certified electricians have connected the neutral and ground to the same lug/terminal in the main box. The electrician could have if there were a ground wire, done the same in this incident, but evidently did not run a ground wire.
__________________
OldCoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 10:04 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
fast murray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: SD
Posts: 439
What size is the wire going to that 50 amp breaker. It should be #8 but its tough to tell in the picture.
__________________
2004 Wildcat 28BH
2012 Ram 2500 CCSB 6.7CTD
fast murray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 10:09 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
fast murray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: SD
Posts: 439
Quote:
Originally Posted by johntaylor View Post
The power delivered to your house is 220V 2-phase
Just for fun, residential power is typically 240 volt 1 phase. There is no 2 phase power, only single phase and three phase.
__________________
2004 Wildcat 28BH
2012 Ram 2500 CCSB 6.7CTD
fast murray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 10:37 PM   #38
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by fast murray View Post
Just for fun, residential power is typically 240 volt 1 phase. There is no 2 phase power, only single phase and three phase.
Not so. The voltages in the 2 hot wires are 180 degrees out of phase. That makes it a 2-phase supply, and that's how you get 240V between the 2 hot wires. If the 2 hot wires were in phase, making it a 1-phase supply, you would have 0V between the hot wires. As you say, there is also 3-phase power; the 3 hot wires there are 120 degrees out of phase.
__________________
johntaylor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 10:44 PM   #39
Senior Member
 
B and B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wilmot Twp, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 8,604
Two Phase power does not exist. Either single phase like most homes or a 50 amp RV or 3 phase not found in RV

From Wilipedia..

Two-phase electrical power was an early 20th-century polyphase alternating current electric power distribution system. Two circuits were used, with voltage phases differing by one-quarter of a cycle, 90. Usually circuits used four wires, two for each phase. Less frequently, three wires were used, with a common wire with a larger-diameter conductor. Some early two-phase generators had two complete rotor and field assemblies, with windings physically offset to provide two-phase power. The generators at Niagara Falls installed in 1895 were the largest generators in the world at that time and were two-phase electric machines. As of 21st century, two-phase power was superseded with three phases and is not used in the industry. There remains, however, a two-phase commercial distribution system in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; many buildings in city center are permanently wired for two-phase[citation needed] and PECO (the local electric utility company) has continued the service.
__________________
B and B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2015, 10:55 PM   #40
TGR
Senior Member
 
TGR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisbailey13 View Post
My RV breaker looks similar to the one the OP posted in #6, one thing that is missing from his picture is if there is a Neutral Bar in the breaker box that may not be shown in the picture.


if there is it would alleviate a lot of the speculation that the electrician wired the outlet wrong.

It looks like the view of the neutral/ground busbar in post #6 is partially obscured by the circuit breakers. However the busbar is visible in the slots without circuit breakers. The two white neutral wires are wired to the neutral/ground busbar and so are the two green wires.

Fast murrray is correct, residential homes are supplied by split-phase power, not 2-phase power.
__________________

__________________
2015 Wildcat 282 RKX
2011 F350 Lariat, 6.7 L. Diesel, 8 ft., SRW, Reese R20
TGR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
50 amp, electrical

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:08 PM.