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Old 12-13-2019, 01:24 AM   #1
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Is 28,000 miles on used 2015 unit excessive?

Never owned a Motorhome before so this question may seem elementary

I hate to purchase new for a first time motorhome purchase (hate that big depreciation hit too) so been hunting for several months for the floorplan we like. Found it. The thing is the mileage. This is a gasser V-10. Own and owned 2 V-10’s in F250 & F350 and got 340,000 miles on first truck and at 240,000 on current truck—-no problems but we are talking a motorhome...

The unit appears to have been taken care of but that could be the dealership doing a great clean on the unit.

Would 28,000 miles be a big concern for this Georgetown?
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Old 12-13-2019, 06:37 AM   #2
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I have a 2015 GT and just turning 48K miles. As long as the unit was maintained (oil changes, etc,) I would not be concerned. Does the dealer have any service records?
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Old 12-13-2019, 07:59 AM   #3
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I would say the average mileage for a MH actually being used for regular weekends and one long trip a year is between 4-6k miles. So it sounds like the miles are right there. As long as it's in good shape and well taken care of I see no issues with the miles.
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Old 12-13-2019, 10:25 AM   #4
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My 2012 has 73,000 miles and regular oil and filter changes and we are rolling with no issues with the drive train.
Expect at least another 30,000 miles before I sell or die.
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Old 12-13-2019, 02:52 PM   #5
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That mileage is no concern whatsoever. It would be nice to see what maintenance/service has been done. Minimum would be oil, lube and filter.
Unless you’re near the mountains, the brakes should be well within limits.
Check if there’s been any routine service done on the generator. They can bog down if not serviced and run properly.
Once again, the tires are getting close to, if not at their age limit. RARELY do people wear out their tires from mileage....it’s age wear and/or sun if not covered properly.
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Old 12-13-2019, 03:41 PM   #6
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I agree I have a 2017 that has almost 20,000 miles on it and looks and runs like new. I hope to get 150,000 miles on it if I live that long! Everyone I spoke to about the triton V10 says it is a workhorse and runs great with few problems. The one thing to think about and others tell me, is that starting in 2016 they went to a 6 speed transmission and that has lowered the engine noise a lot. Not like a diesel but my rpms hardly get above 2500 and I hear a lot at 3500-4000 rpms but they say the V10 takes it in stride and doesn’t hurt the engine. Good Luck also Full Body Paint is nice if you can get it. It doesn’t fade and weather as much they say?
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Old 12-13-2019, 04:55 PM   #7
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It's not even near broke in yet.
Do a oil change with your favorite oil, use the best oil filter (Mobil One Filter) have the belts, hoses checked, change out the radiator fluid, new battery (chassis) Do a transmission service done and away you go! That is as close to a bullet proof engine as you will find. Use top tier premium gas (Shell)
Might seem excessive but PM is everything..............by doing the above you know right where you're starting at and won't miss a thing.
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Old 12-13-2019, 06:48 PM   #8
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Agree with the others. My 2015 has 60k on it and not one drive train related issue in 5 years. I expect to well exceed 100k before I'm done... and it may outlive me!
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Old 12-13-2019, 08:34 PM   #9
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Mine is a 2015 Chev., with 26,000 miles on it 28,000 miles is a little over 5,000 miles a year. Are you kidding it's just breaking in.





















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Old 12-14-2019, 12:31 AM   #10
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Thanks everyone. I’ve been a firm believer of preventative maintenance. Like I said I’ve got tons of miles out of the v-10 tow vehicles. Kenandterry did bring up the tire concern and I agree that they may be at the time to consider changing. Gonna do a full inspection on Tuesday.
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Old 12-14-2019, 08:50 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wannabe123 View Post
Thanks everyone. I’ve been a firm believer of preventative maintenance. Like I said I’ve got tons of miles out of the v-10 tow vehicles. Kenandterry did bring up the tire concern and I agree that they may be at the time to consider changing. Gonna do a full inspection on Tuesday.
The tires could be older than your motorhome.
Do you know how to read the “manufacture date” found on tires?

Read here......

https://www.tirebuyer.com/education/...-of-your-tires
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Old 12-14-2019, 12:10 PM   #12
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It's my belief that a vehicle that has some miles on it is better than one that's just sat for 5 years. 28,000 miles is just under 6,000 miles per year and if oil changes have been performed at regular intervals it's really a "low mileage" vehicle.

Sounds like the previous owner got out and traveled and the easiest miles are highway miles.


If I were looking to buy a unit like this I'd plan on a complete "fluid change" from radiator to differential and everything between (including power steering fluid). Tires and brakes may also be an upcoming expense. Take these into consideration when evaluating the "price to good deal ratio".
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Old 12-14-2019, 12:34 PM   #13
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Quote:
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It's my belief that a vehicle that has some miles on it is better than one that's just sat for 5 years. 28,000 miles is just under 6,000 miles per year and if oil changes have been performed at regular intervals it's really a "low mileage" vehicle.

Sounds like the previous owner got out and traveled and the easiest miles are highway miles.


If I were looking to buy a unit like this I'd plan on a complete "fluid change" from radiator to differential and everything between (including power steering fluid). Tires and brakes may also be an upcoming expense. Take these into consideration when evaluating the "price to good deal ratio".
I agree. We bought our 2014 last year with 7,500 miles showing. Figuring the coach went from the MFG, to Louisiana, then Oregon, and finally to the Central Valley, all locations dealerships, the original owner didn't put any miles on the coach. That said, we were buying a 4 year old coach with virtually no miles. I had the dealership do a complete service on all fluids and new tires all the way around. I was still a bit nervous the first few thousand miles! But, 11,000 miles later, no surprises!
Don't worry about that mileage, enjoy!
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Old 12-16-2019, 06:38 PM   #14
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What’s The Ford V-10 Life Expectancy?

What’s The Ford V-10 Life Expectancy?
May 24, 2019

If you are in the market for a used heavy-duty Ford you have probably wondered just how long you can expect the V10 engine to last. That’s because Ford installed this engine as part of its modular engine lineup from 1999 to 2010 in its Super Duty trucks. What’s more, most of these trucks are priced much lower than a comparable diesel truck.
But is it worth the investment, or will you better off ponying up for the diesel equivalent? To help you find out, we have researched everything there is to know about the Ford V10, so you can know just how many miles you can expect to get out of it.
In short, what we found is that the Ford V10 has a stellar reputation for reliability. Assuming the engine has been well cared for throughout its life, you can expect it to last at least 200,000 miles before needing to perform any major repairs. That means the big V10 shouldn’t scare you away, unless 10 mpg on a good day frightens you, that is.
But there is a lot more to consider when it comes to the Ford V10 engine. Is it the right engine for you, or should you stick to the diesels and V8s you’re used to? Keep reading as we discuss the ins and outs of this big, unusual power plant.
What Is The Ford V10 All About?
First introduced for the 1997 model year, the Ford V10 was initially used in E-series vans and the motorhomes based off of them. To create this engine, Ford simply added two cylinders to the modular, 5.4-liter V8 that was introduced at the same time.
The flexible modular engine family had already been around since 1991, so by this point, we can assume that Ford knew the ins and outs of this powerplant. Other engines in this line include the 4.6-, 5.0- and 5.4-liter V8s
The initial version of the V10, a 2-valve unit, was used until 2005. After debuting in Ford’s van lineup, they made their way into the F250 through F550, as well as the Excursion SUV. This engine produced between 305 and 310 horsepower and 420 to 425 lb-ft of torque.
In 2005, a new version of the V10 was introduced. Using 3 valves, the new and improved V10 saw a power bump and was installed in a new family of vehicles. Making a maximum of 365 horsepower and 460 lb-ft of torque, this engine was strong enough to be used in the F750 as well as the Blue Bird school bus.
V10 Reliability
We know that, as part of the Ford modular engine family, the V10 has some solid engineering roots. And the fact that Ford decided to use this engine in so many different industrial-strength vehicles should tell us something about its durability. After all, commercial buyers won’t put up with weak or fidgety engines in the vehicles they use to make a living.
After checking out the common issues and owner reports on various Ford forums, it appears that the V10 is a very reliable engine as well. In fact, it is quite hard to find anyone voicing any major concerns about the robustness of their Ford V10.
So How Many Miles Can You Expect From A V10?
It can be hard to determine just how long an engine will last you. There is no registry of engines and their lifespans, so all we can really go off are owner and mechanic reports of their experiences with the V10. Sure, it’s not an exact science, but this method usually works pretty well. Owners are often quick to warn others when they have had bad experiences with a certain vehicle or engine.
Checking the various Ford truck forums online, there are countless reports of problem-free V10 experiences, as well as engines lasting well over 200,000 miles. One owner even reports having 439,000 miles on their V10, with very few problems along the way. That’s diesel engine territory!
If you have a well-maintained V10 in your possession, I see no reason you shouldn’t expect at least 200,000 miles out of it, as long as you continue caring for it by the book. That means regular oil changes and everything else as prescribed in your owner’s manual – fuel filters, transmission fluid, everything.
A Warning About Longevity Numbers
As we discuss the life expectancy of this engine, keep in mind that no two used vehicles are the same. Owners treat their vehicles very differently, from the levels of use and abuse to the maintenance schedule. A high-mileage engine that has been maintained religiously could very well serve you better and for longer than a lower-mileage truck with a poor maintenance history.
That means there is no one solid answer to the question of how long the Ford V10 engine lasts. Still, all trucks are not created equal. Some are just more reliable than others. Nearly every diesel engine out there, for example, has a stellar reputation for
Other Issues With The V10
Okay, so these engines can last a long time, but will there be tons of little issues along the way? According to most owners, the answer is “no.” In fact, aside from a couple of minor repairs, very few V10 owners have had to deal with anything but routine maintenance. Still, let’s go over some of the concerns with the Ford V10.
Fuel Economy
Okay, no one expects to get Prius-like mileage out of their pickups, especially heavy duty ones. But the Ford V10 has a reputation for getting even worse mileage than just about anything else out there. Compared to diesel trucks, the V10 sucks down fuel like it’s going out of style.
Checking out owner-reported fuel economy on fuelly.com, most of these trucks are averaging between 8 and 10 mpg. That’s low, but what can you expect from the diesel engines? After all, these are big, heavy trucks that are more often than not towing and hauling huge loads.
Well, according to the (much more numerous) owner reports, pretty much all of the diesel engines, including the venerable 7.3-liter, get 3 to 6 more miles per gallon than the V10. That’s a huge difference when we are talking about fuel economy numbers this low.
Rough Idle
One of the most common complaints about the V10 is a rough idle. For anyone who has experienced this issue, it sure can be annoying. The good news is that the fix is often a simple and cheap one.
If you happen to find an otherwise great V10-engined truck that suffers from this issue, first check the PCV hose. Often, these hoses will develop a crack over time that leads to the rough idle. And there are plenty of videos online showing you how to fix this issue yourself.
Exhaust Problems
Other than the idle, the other main concern regarding Ford V10 reliability is the exhaust system. Many owners report that their manifold studs rust out and fail, leading to an exhaust leak. You can easily find repair kits online for less than $30 that should remedy the problem.
Clearly, you would rather have an issue with a relatively inexpensive exhaust than an engine. Still, this is something to have checked on your vehicle before purchasing, just so you know what to expect down the road.
Advantages Of The V10
Just as there are downsides to this engine, there are also some positive things to consider.
Price
Perhaps because of the poor fuel economy or maybe it’s because people don’t know how reliable these engines are, but V10 Fords sell for thousands less than diesel pickups. And because many shoppers will only consider a diesel, they are relatively easy to find on the used market.
Gas Power
If you would rather stick to a familiar gas engine than a diesel, but still want plenty of power for towing, the V10 is a great option. From 2005 to 2010, the Super Duty V10 offered 362 horsepower and 457 lb-ft of torque. Sure, it’s not modern diesel-levels of torque, but that’s a lot of power for a gas engine. Even the 2018 F-350’s 6.2-liter gas V8 engine can’t match that torque!

Conclusion
Now that we know all about how amazingly reliable the V10 is, I hope that you know everything you need about making this purchase. According to all of my research, there is really no reason not to go for it. That is, unless the rather appalling gas mileage figures scare you away.
But that really is the only major concern with these engines, and I suspect anyone shopping for a V10-powered RV isn’t too terribly concerned with fuel economy in the first place.
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Old 12-16-2019, 07:13 PM   #15
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Awesome review Iggy.
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Old 12-16-2019, 08:21 PM   #16
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Iggy always has great reviews!
Always information that is good to know or at least good to hear again.
We are so lucky to have Iggy and other very very knowledgeable
people on these forums. Thanks Again!
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