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Old 08-02-2014, 08:05 PM   #21
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Thanks all. I'll see what my dealer figures out. I'm not optimistic!!


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Old 08-03-2014, 07:30 AM   #22
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Thanks all. I'll see what my dealer figures out. I'm not optimistic!!
At what point does someone say, "The GFCI is reporting exactly what it is suppose to report. You have a ground fault; a current leakage. The fault can be anything after the GFCI."

Numerous reasons can cause this. But the one fact that exists with little doubt. You have an electrical fault. A fault that is located by disconnecting things until the fault terminates.

For example, a wiring problem in the RV might not cause this trip until something inside the RV consumers current through that wire. Only one of many reasons for that clearly existing fault.

BTW, it demonstrates so many will make recommendations without understanding basic electrical concepts such as what a GFCI reports.
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Old 08-03-2014, 09:42 AM   #23
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At what point does someone say, "The GFCI is reporting exactly what it is suppose to report. You have a ground fault; a current leakage. The fault can be anything after the GFCI."

Numerous reasons can cause this. But the one fact that exists with little doubt. You have an electrical fault. A fault that is located by disconnecting things until the fault terminates.

For example, a wiring problem in the RV might not cause this trip until something inside the RV consumers current through that wire. Only one of many reasons for that clearly existing fault.

BTW, it demonstrates so many will make recommendations without understanding basic electrical concepts such as what a GFCI reports.

Totally agree. As I previously indicated, I turned off all breakers, including the main. As soon as I turned the main back on, it tripped the GFI! So I assume nothing beyond the panel is the cause.


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Old 08-03-2014, 09:49 AM   #24
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Totally agree. As I previously indicated, I turned off all breakers, including the main. As soon as I turned the main back on, it tripped the GFI! So I assume nothing beyond the panel is the cause.
So where is the electrical conductor that connects the hot or neutral wire to safety ground or to earth? You have a fault. The defect need only conduct 0.005 amps. But GFCI says that fault (and potential human safety issue) exists. Often inspection is an only effective solution.

For example, is the safety ground and neutral wire connected together in the panel? Those must not connect until they meet back at the pole. Or in your case, back at the house main panel.

A screw might not have been removed to separate safety ground and neutral. A continuity (ohm) meter might be used to verify a disconnected RV means no connection between safety ground, hot, and neutral wires.

0.005 amps means a fault might be as much as 10,000 ohm.
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Old 08-03-2014, 11:02 AM   #25
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Any chance your 50 amp cable could have gotten any moisture in it? Dripping from the a/c or washing the vehicle? I had a similar problem with my gfci in the coach. The main gfci was in the kitchen and I had 2 standard outlets piggybacked off of the gfci. 1st was in the bathroom and the 2nd was in the storage bay that was forward of the rear wheel. It was mounted on the rear wall with the wires going through it into the wheel well area. We had driven through a rain storm and the tire kicked up the rain and forced the moisture through the cable insulation into the back of the outlet housing. It was a few days after we had driven through the rain that I trouble shot why the gfci was kicking out. When I remove the back of the outlet in the storage bay I could just see slight dampness in the outlet. I disconnected it and was able to reset the gfci. Knowing this was the problem I reconnected it and decided to leave the back of the outlet off and the storage bay door open to air out. There was absolutely no signs of water intrusion into the bay only dampness on the back of the outlet. I tried to reset the gfci after letting it air dry for an hour and it would not reset. It took about 6 hours of air drying to be able to reset the gfci. My point is that it only takes a small amount of dampness for the gfci to kick out.
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Old 08-03-2014, 11:15 AM   #26
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Any chance your 50 amp cable could have gotten any moisture in it? Dripping from the a/c or washing the vehicle? I had a similar problem with my gfci in the coach. The main gfci was in the kitchen and I had 2 standard outlets piggybacked off of the gfci. 1st was in the bathroom and the 2nd was in the storage bay that was forward of the rear wheel. It was mounted on the rear wall with the wires going through it into the wheel well area. We had driven through a rain storm and the tire kicked up the rain and forced the moisture through the cable insulation into the back of the outlet housing. It was a few days after we had driven through the rain that I trouble shot why the gfci was kicking out. When I remove the back of the outlet in the storage bay I could just see slight dampness in the outlet. I disconnected it and was able to reset the gfci. Knowing this was the problem I reconnected it and decided to leave the back of the outlet off and the storage bay door open to air out. There was absolutely no signs of water intrusion into the bay only dampness on the back of the outlet. I tried to reset the gfci after letting it air dry for an hour and it would not reset. It took about 6 hours of air drying to be able to reset the gfci. My point is that it only takes a small amount of dampness for the gfci to kick out.

I think that may be exactly what happened. However, it isn't my coach GFI that's tripping. It's the 20 amp outlets on shore power.


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Old 08-03-2014, 06:31 PM   #27
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I think that may be exactly what happened. However, it isn't my coach GFI that's tripping.
A five milliamp fault on the cable from coach to 'shore' is completely ignored by any GFCI in the coach. That becomes obvious once 'what a GFCI does' is learned.

GFCI in the house must detect a 5+ milliamp fault in that cable.
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Old 08-03-2014, 07:10 PM   #28
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A five milliamp fault on the cable from coach to 'shore' is completely ignored by any GFCI in the coach. That becomes obvious once 'what a GFCI does' is learned.

GFCI in the house must detect a 5+ milliamp fault in that cable.

I know my 50 amp cable did get wet at the 50 amp to 30 amp adaptor. Makes sense my 50 amp cable may be the culprit??


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Old 08-03-2014, 07:38 PM   #29
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Makes sense my 50 amp cable may be the culprit??
If true, then a GFCI was reporting a defect that should not exist. Those cables should get wet and not leak even 5 milliamps.

We learn from our mistakes. Note many who wanted to cure symptoms rather than identify a potential human safety problem. A GFCI trips because a potential human safety defect exists. I cannot say how many times others have blamed a GFCI instead of a sump pump that had a human safety defect in the pump or on its power cord.
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Old 08-03-2014, 07:50 PM   #30
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[QUOTE=westom;672662]If true, then a GFCI was reporting a defect that should not exist. Those cables should get wet and not leak even 5 milliamps.

So what's my cure? Appreciate all your info. Good stuff!


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