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Old 04-11-2016, 05:46 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by carmex View Post
We're hoping to get our order placed for a new 364TS today. Our plan is to start full-timing this fall for anywhere between 1 and 3 years. We are a small family (only 3 of us) and plan to do some modifications to turn the bunkhouse into an office for me to work. I'm curious why you feel the 364 might not be a good fit for full-timers. I too feel like it's one of the best bang for the buck out there and want to make sure I'm not missing anything that would be a problem using this thing full time.



Thanks!

No, please don't misunderstand. I am not saying the 364 is not for full timers. I am not a full timer so I can't speak to the full time experience, but it appears that many full timers say that diesel pushers work better for them. I guess because they put a lot of miles on their coach? My comments were more based on how pleasurable my 364 is to drive and I couldn't justify another 150k on top of what we spent for a "better" driving experience than what is already a pretty decent ride. I'd rather buy TWO 364's and have one on each coast to travel each half of the country ..............with money to spare!
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Old 04-11-2016, 05:49 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Melvinson404 View Post
No, please don't misunderstand. I am not saying the 364 is not for full timers. I am not a full timer so I can't speak to the full time experience, but it appears that many full timers say that diesel pushers work better for them. I guess because they put a lot of miles on their coach? My comments were more based on how pleasurable my 364 is to drive and I couldn't justify another 150k on top of what we spent for a "better" driving experience than what is already a pretty decent ride. I'd rather buy TWO 364's and have one on each coast to travel each half of the country ..............with money to spare!
Lol...
yes I'm of the same mindset. Can't personally justify the extra expense. Plus I'm hoping to handle a lot of the maintenance myself, and that becomes harder on a diesel. Not to mention this is just our favorite floor plan, DP or otherwise. Glad to hear there aren't any show-stoppers.
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Old 04-11-2016, 09:23 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by SKnight View Post
It will help. How much is debatable and only you can be the judge.

If you want to find exactly what tire pressure each axle likes, you need a tire crayon available at any parts store, a flat parking lot, and an afternoon.

Fill your tires to their max pressure as indicated on the sidewall. Don't worry about recommendations for now and no disaster will befall you.

Go to your flat parking lot, then use the crayon to draw a three inch wide stripe all the way side to side across the tread block. Do this on all the tires. Then hop in, and drive forward about 20 feet. You want the tires to turn at least twice. Try to watch the valve stem and stop with it at the same place you started so you can see your marks.

Then look at your crayon marks. Chances are the center will be gone, but not the sides. The high pressure causes the center to bulge slightly. Drop the pressure five psi, fill in where the crayon was rubbed off, and drive forward again. Check, color the block back in, and repeat dropping the pressure each time. As you get close you can drop less pressure at a time.

Once the crayon block is evenly rubbed off, that is your pressure the tire likes under that load. Don't drop below minimum recommended pressure.

What this does is establish even pressure across the tread block, which is what the inflation charts do if you know your actual weights.

The next morning when the tires are cold check the pressures, but it shouldn't vary much since odds are they won't be too hot driving to then playing in a parking lot. Reset the pressure to your new number established in the parking lot, and give it a try.
I love accuracy. Your methodology also explains how properly loading a tire INCREASES tread life when running lower pressure.

Thanks!
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Old 04-11-2016, 09:31 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by carmex View Post
We're hoping to get our order placed for a new 364TS today. Our plan is to start full-timing this fall for anywhere between 1 and 3 years. We are a small family (only 3 of us) and plan to do some modifications to turn the bunkhouse into an office for me to work. I'm curious why you feel the 364 might not be a good fit for full-timers. I too feel like it's one of the best bang for the buck out there and want to make sure I'm not missing anything that would be a problem using this thing full time.

Thanks!

Welcome to the 364 club. It seems to be extremely popular with a new group of previously ignored motorhome buyers: Families!

The only reasons i could think of for a 364 not being suitable are:

1) You gave up critical pantry space for that 2nd full bathroom

2) DPs might be more comfortable for extensive driving.

3) The 364 has an inexcusably small fresh water tank, making it hard to boon dock.

That being said, the reason it may work better for you is because of that 2nd full bathroom, it is what moved us from a 351DS. Many people have also conceded that the 2016 transmission and tweaks has considerably improved the ride. This comes from owners of the older 5 speed based coaches and a few former DP owners that have moved back to gassers due to expense of maintaining DPs.

Happy trails!
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Old 04-11-2016, 09:36 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Vince and Charlette View Post
On my 2015 GT 364, I've spent $3,200 on heavy duty Roadmaster front and rear anti-sway bars, steering stabilizer and rear Tracbar. All of this combined netted a moderate improvement. I'm going for he Sumos next since I've heard some good things about them. But then, every type/brand of modification has its staunch advocates. On each thing I've purchased, I was influenced by more than one person saying this is the one mods that does it all. So, be careful who you listen to. On the other hand, I have to admit that the more trips I take (14K in the last 12 months), the better I am at handling my GT. So, experience helps.
I need to apologize for forgetting to answer you in another thread that I lost track of. I am in Quebec which is rather far from you but I will be going south via Washington in July and am flexible in dates so maybe our paths can cross.

I really think you need to try a 22.5" equipped 364TS. I understand about the magic pill that everyone claims will make a huge difference but proof is in the pudding.

PM me your plans and we will see if we can make something happen.
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