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Old 08-26-2013, 02:46 PM   #1
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Selecting House battery replacements

I know this subject has been talked around but I feel it is one that can't be bypassed and should be on everyones minds year round.

The standard 12 volt Class 27 batteries that are installed in Georgetowns are basic batteries. Life expectance varies on climate, use and maintenance.

Now the Class 27 size are basically the same
They all have 6 cells
They are lead acid type

They all are made by a few manufacturers
The biggest being Johnson Controls who make them for
Walmart
Sams Club
Costco
Interstate

The differences are price and amperages.
The reason why is the Retailers label and the thickness of the actual cell plates.
The heavier the battery the thicker the plates which in turn makes a longer living battery that can handle and hold voltage longer.


We can also talk compare sealed AGM deep cycle batteries.


This should be really exciting




What is the main difference between a starting and a deep cycle battery?
1. A starting battery is designed for the purpose of starting the engine... thats it!
2. A marine/RV deep cycle battery is designed to have the capability of many deep discharges.
3. The deep cycle battery can handle hundreds of full discharges where a starting battery is usually in the 20-50 range.
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Old 08-26-2013, 03:01 PM   #2
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I will start this off with

Sears who sell Diehard Batteries

They have 3 models and all 3 batteries are exactly the same price of $108 plus old battery exchange.

They are lead acid and are the same physical size.

Now here is the difference

Model 33027, 750 Cold Cranking Amps with 135 amps reserve, 50 lbs

Model 50727, 825 Cold Cranking Amps with 140 amps reserve, 49.5 lbs

Model 50527, 750 Cold Cranking Amps with 140 amps reserve, 48 lbs

As you can see they all are close but not sure which I would pick.. Do you?
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Old 08-26-2013, 03:18 PM   #3
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Tips to make your batteries last longer

Here are some great battery tips I found that can help all of us.

Top 7 Tips for Saving your RV Batteries

Did you know that almost 85 percent of all 12-volt batteries manufactured in the United States will die before they should?
The two most common causes for RV battery failure are undercharging and overcharging. Undercharging is a result of batteries being repeatedly discharged and not fully recharged between cycles. If a battery is not recharged the sulfate material that attaches to the discharged portions of the plates begins to harden into crystals. Over time, this sulfate cannot be converted back into active plate material and the battery is ruined. This also occurs when a battery remains discharged for an extended period of time. Sulfation is the number one cause of battery failure.


The second leading cause of battery failure is overcharging. Overcharging batteries results in severe water loss and plate corrosion. This is especially true when it comes to RV batteries. The RV converter has a built-in battery charger. Most owners are under the impression that if you leave the RV plugged in when it is being stored, the converter will keep the batteries topped off.


The problem is many converter chargers provide a constant charge of about 13.5 volts, which is too high for fully charged batteries, and the electrolyte is boiled off. The result is an early death for the batteries. The good news is both of these problems are avoidable.


Here are my Top 7 quick tips to help prevent your RV batteries from becoming a statistic.


1. Sulfation will occur when a battery’s state of charge drops below 80 percent, or 12.4 volts. Recharging a battery at an 80 percent state of charge will prevent sulfation. Using a battery charger, maintainer and conditioner like the Battery Minder will prevent sulfation, too.


2. Never let a battery discharge below 10.5 volts.


3. Reducing the battery’s depth of discharge will increase the life of the battery. A battery discharged to 50 percent every day (50 percent capacity remaining) will last twice as long as it would if it’s cycled to 80 percent (20 percent capacity remaining).


4. RVs have parasitic loads that will discharge the battery over time. Some, but not all, of these loads are LP-gas leak detectors, the TV antenna power booster, clocks, stereos and appliance circuit boards. If your RV is equipped with a battery disconnect switch, make sure it is in the OFF position when you’re not using the RV or when it is in storage. Batteries in storage will self discharge.
It’s not uncommon for a battery to discharge up to 10 percent a month. Check and recharge batteries in storage as required.


5. Hot temperatures and overcharging kill batteries. During hot weather or during high usage check the batteries frequently. Checking the electrolyte levels and adding distilled water as required can save your lead acid batteries.


6. Properly charging your batteries needs to be done in stages. A bulk charge should be performed to return the battery to 90 percent of a full charge in the first few hours. An absorption charge is used for the remaining 10 percent, and then a float charge to keep the battery fully charged.


7. Batteries should only be watered after charging, unless the plates are exposed prior to charging. If the plates are exposed, add just enough water to cover the plates. To get a quick picture of the battery’s condition, use a digital voltmeter. A fully charged battery should read about 12.7 volts. A battery reading of 12.4 volts or less should be charged to prevent sulfation. The battery should only be tested after resting for 12 hours. Resting means it has not been charged, or had a load placed on it over a 12-hour time period.

The sad news is most RV batteries only last two to three years. Through some routine maintenance and following some of these quick tips, you can double the life of your RV batteries.
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Old 08-26-2013, 03:25 PM   #4
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Had my two batteries go on my old rig while in the process of looking for a new(er) rig, now our Georgetown. The Interstate's that were in the old rig were about six years old only. Replacement cost was $180 each! Bought two at Wal Mart for $70 each and I am sure they will last at least as long as the expensive Interstates, though I never did get any use out of them before trading the old rig in.
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Old 08-26-2013, 03:32 PM   #5
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On another point, back in my boating days tooling around Lake Erie (0 to 5 foot waves in minutes) and there was a lot more at stake compared to RV'ing, all I used in my boat were Sears Diehards.
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Old 08-26-2013, 04:39 PM   #6
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I like my new 6 volt golf cart batteries hooked in series. They are taller , heavier and more expensive than the twelves but I am told they will last a lot longer.
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Old 08-26-2013, 05:52 PM   #7
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Iggy

Thanks for your informative response
I do have a question
I have a Progressive dynamic model pd9270 on my motorhome. When I store my coach I unplug the converter and then plug it into an extension cord so I will be keeping the coach batteries charged up. Is this okay or am I doing any damage to the coach batteries if they are stored this way for 4 to 6 weeks at a time.
The converter says it has an automatic boost mode, normal mode, storage mode and an equalizer mode.
Thanks
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Old 08-26-2013, 06:00 PM   #8
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I love you guys and your wisdom... however, what I need is a simple kick in the butt, point me in a direction and statement... "This is the one that you need!" I'm okay with that! ;-)
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Old 08-26-2013, 06:05 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrapperman View Post
Iggy
Thanks for your informative response
I do have a question
I have a Progressive dynamic model pd9270 on my motorhome. When I store my coach I unplug the converter and then plug it into an extension cord so I will be keeping the coach batteries charged up. Is this okay or am I doing any damage to the coach batteries if they are stored this way for 4 to 6 weeks at a time.
The converter says it has an automatic boost mode, normal mode, storage mode and an equalizer mode.
Thanks
I'm no expert but I also shutdown my battery power when stored.
I also have Progressive Dynamics PD9270 which is a smart battery charger. It is a great battery charger and battery conditioner.
It will exercise your battery properly when just plugged in and don't use.
Leave it plugged in but check fluid levels before and after long storage.
Fill with distilled water from grocery store.


Here is what they say from their website.

INTELI-POWER 9200 Series Operation
Progressive Dynamics 9200 Series Electronic Power Converters have several features that differ from other electronic power converters presently marketed to the RV industry. Reliability data over the past eight years on over 400,000 units in the field have proven that these design features increase our reliability and provide the following additional customer benefits.

1. ELECTRONIC CURRENT LIMITING – This safety feature will rapidly reduce the converter output in case of an electrical short or overload condition. This rapid shutdown, similar to a circuit breaker in your house, prevents possible RV wiring and converter damage. The converter automatically returns to normal operation when the short or overload is corrected.

2. VARIABLE SPEED INTELLIGENT COOLING FAN – Solid state temperature sensing and control system automatically monitors converter temperature and activates the fan at speed required. Very slow, quiet speeds are used when demand is low, such as during sleeping hours. Some competitive converters use Electro-mechanical devices to provide temperature sensing and fan control. Electro-mechanical sensors are more subject to failure and may stick in the closed mode causing the fan to operate all the time, resulting in an irritating noise. They can also fail to close during high temperature conditions and prevent the fan from operating. This failure may cause over heating and possible converter failure.

3. AUTOMATIC THERMAL PROTECTION – This safety feature will reduce converter output in the unlikely event of a fan failure and prevent damage to the converter. This safety feature will also activate if the area where the converter is mounted is too small, has inadequate ventilation, or is accidentally covered by the customer. Please refer to the installation instructions for information regarding spacing and ventilation requirements.

4. LOW VOLTAGE PROTECTION – The Progressive Dynamics 9200 Series Converters will operate at low AC line voltages without damage. This feature is especially important in RV campgrounds where AC line voltage can be as low as 90 volts. Low AC line voltages may damage competitive converters. Low Line Voltage Protection will automatically shut converter down if input voltage is insufficient. This also protects your 12-volt appliances from damaging low voltage irregularities. The converter will automatically return to normal operation when adequate line voltage is available.

5. HIGH VOLTAGE PROTECTION – All converters incorporate our patented High Voltage Shutdown circuitry. This feature automatically shuts the converter down to protect sensitive electronics in the event of high voltage transients on the AC power line, or if the RV generator regulator should momentarily fail. The converter will automatically return to normal operation when the high voltage transient is corrected.

6. REVERSE BATTERY PROTECTION – Our patented Reverse Battery circuitry prevents converter damage and unnecessary warranty calls in the event the customer or dealer accidentally connects the battery in reverse. Simple replacement of the fuse(s) located on the front of the converter restores the unit to normal operation. Some competitive converters can be damaged and require replacement if the battery leads are accidentally reversed.
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Old 08-26-2013, 06:17 PM   #10
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Thanks Iggy

You seem to have some great tips.
For now I will keep it plugged in and monitor the batteries. We use our coach at least once a month. If I find myself keeping it in storage for more than 2 months I'll unplug it and disconnect the batteries.
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