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Old 05-27-2015, 02:16 PM   #1
jcw
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Shore power, inverter and residential refrigerator GT 351ds

I have a 30 Amp hookup where I store my RV. I was wondering which is a best practice:
1. Inverter off and run on AC for refrigerator
2. Plugged in to 30 Amp but inverter on. This would appear to provide protection against power outages. Not sure if it puts more stress on coach batteries.

Thoughts?

By the way, love this forum site. It has been so helpful as I researched and ultimately bought by 2015 GT 351DS
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Old 05-27-2015, 02:33 PM   #2
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Plugged in to shore power.. inverter off. (I'm assuming you have a residential)

With the inverter on.. yes.. it would provide protection against power outages, however, you're batteries probably won't last very long powering a residential fridge. You're more likely to go out to your rig and find the batteries stone cold dead in that situation.

Short outages shouldn't be an issue since your reefer can maintain temperature for several hours. Long term outages.. I'm sure you'll hear about it on the news, at which time you can power up your inverter or make other arrangements (genset).

I still would not keep many perishables in my unattended reefer.
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Old 05-27-2015, 02:35 PM   #3
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Hmm, interesting question... We also have the 351DS (2014 model) with residential fridge and wishing I had 30 amp at my storage location.

Is your concern that the power may go out thus raising your fridge temp and spoiling whatever you left in it? If so, I'd leave the inverter on and that way you've always got power (unless power is out for days and your batteries go dead of course). I always have the inverter on during trips whether plugged in or on shore power, never really thought about any negative impacts of that. Hmmm...

Something to consider is a thermometer that has the high/low record, I saw a digital one on Amazon for less than $20. Might give you piece of mind knowing that jar of mayo never got up to 80 degrees....ewwww.

I guess I'll have to dig in a little more on how the wiring actually works for the inverter/fridge. I was thinking that on shore power/generator the auto-switch would allow it to draw power from there and not the batteries. Power goes out, switch goes back to batteries and inverter takes over. Hopefully someone knows how this REALLY works.

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Old 05-27-2015, 02:57 PM   #4
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Tom, you hit the nail on the head regarding my question. I assume that when plugged into shore power and inverter is on that the residential refrigerator is powered via AC power either from:
1. Inverter fed by coach batteries, which are in turn continuously recharged from shore power
2. From ATS directly, by passing inverter. However, in case of losing shore power, the refrigerator gets AC power from inverter until coach batteries are exhausted. In this case, I assume the 4 coach batteries can keep the refrigerator going for about 2 days?

Joel
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Old 05-27-2015, 03:17 PM   #5
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Joel, I would not assume your res fridge will run for 2 days on inverter/batteries.
I did a test on my Berkshire with 4 six volt batteries and it went about 8 hours until the batteries were down 50%.

We leave ours plugged in, inverter off in storage to keep the fridge cold and battery charged.

Didn't want to take a chance on killing 4 expensive batteries.
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Old 05-27-2015, 03:18 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcw View Post
assume the 4 coach batteries can keep the refrigerator going for about 2 days?

Joel
That would depend on your type and size of battery/ies. However, you don't really want to discharge your batteries below 50% of their rated capacity. The reason for keeping your inverter off is that it continuously draws power from your batteries if you are actually using it or not. Just as there is a constant parasitic draw on your batteries without having anything actually "on".

In the situation of keeping it on while on shore power in anticipation of a possible loose of power, you run the risk of not catching it soon enough and depleteing your battery/ies to a 0% SOC, which is quite harmful to your battery/ies.

If you will have your rig in "storage mode" over long periods of time, it is also very damaging to your batteries to keep them in a constant state of charge. Your run the risk of "cooking" your battery/ies.

In a nutshell.. doing damage to my battery bank is a much greater risk in my book than loosing whatever few tidbits I might choose to leave in my reefer. If it was just between weekend get-a-ways I would be more comfortable leaving it stocked and running, but even then, I would have my batteries disconnected.
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Old 05-27-2015, 03:25 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by The Wandering Irishman View Post
I always have the inverter on during trips whether plugged in or on shore power, never really thought about any negative impacts of that. Hmmm...
The only real concern there is that it is still drawing power off your batteries.. even when there is no actual load on the inverter. Heat, longevity of your inverter can be affected, as well as burning more electricity. If your are in a metered CG you'll end up paying for the additional electricity with no practical benefit.

A lot of folks do just the same. There is no real "do" or "don't"... just personal preference and convenience.
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Old 05-27-2015, 03:53 PM   #8
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Yarome,
I did not realize that keeping the batteries fully charged via shore power was a bad thing.... I have always kept other batteries to boats, for example, fully charged via a trickle charger during winter storage? Are you saying that the RV ATS does not do a proper job keeping batteries properly charged over long periods?
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Old 05-27-2015, 03:59 PM   #9
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My unit is going on 5 years old with the original batteries and I leave it plugged in 24/7 365.
I must have done something wrong?

TURBS
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Old 05-27-2015, 04:02 PM   #10
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My unit is going on 5 years old with the original batteries and I leave it plugged in 24/7 365.
I must have done something wrong?
Can you say "Progressive Dynamics charge wizard"? Ohh... that's right.. you CAN!

Completely different animal to a stock converter.
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