Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-21-2009, 06:01 PM   #11
Vic
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 4
Greetings all,

Just to throw a different opinion in the mix, a tow dolly has some advantages over flat wheel towing. The dolly is a lower overall cost to purchase. There are no extra costs or modifications to the towed vehicle. And any front wheel drive can be loaded and towed easily, sometimes we take a Malibu, sometimes the HHR.

Buying a new car isn't a problem as long as it can be loaded on the dolly. The only downside to a dolly is where to put it when it isn't being used.

Have a GREAT day.
__________________

__________________
Vic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2009, 11:35 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Seal Beach, Ca.
Posts: 171
CRV has auto transmission

I read the owner's manual and it gives some instruction on being pulled by an RV. I don't have the instruction in front of me but basically you are putting it in Neutral. So, now I know the CRV is "tow friendly", what all do I need? Is this still going to cost me about $3500? If so, ouch!

Is this fairly easy to hook up and un hook when you get to your destination? It couldn't be that hard. I see a lot of people come in and out of our RV park doing this.
__________________

__________________
georgetown50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2009, 11:52 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
NWJeeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Enumclaw, WA
Posts: 2,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgetown50 View Post
I read the owner's manual and it gives some instruction on being pulled by an RV. I don't have the instruction in front of me but basically you are putting it in Neutral. So, now I know the CRV is "tow friendly", what all do I need? Is this still going to cost me about $3500? If so, ouch!

Is this fairly easy to hook up and unhook when you get to your destination? It couldn't be that hard. I see a lot of people come in and out of our RV park doing this.
If you are using the Roadmaster system where the towbar stays attached to the TV then all you do is disconnect your safety cables at the CRV, pull 2 pins to disconnect the towbar and pull your wiring plug and your done. Literally only takes a minute or two. Very easy. Depending on the braking system it might be a little more involved though.

The roadmaster self adjusting towbars are awesome and I wouldn't consider any other type. No need to be perfectly positioned behind the TV to hookup.

Here is a link to a PDF instruction file for the Roadmaster 5250 bar. It also shows the bracket that mounts to the front of the toad. Of course these will differ by vehicle but when it is all removed when not in use all you can see on the toad is a couple of small square tubes below the bumper.

Like I said, my friend and I installed this system on his CRV in about an hour. If you don't feel comfortable doing the wiring you can have a shop do it. However all the wiring for the rear lights runs through the trunk area where your spare tire is and is easy to access if your good at that stuff.
__________________
"I can fix it, and if I can't fix it, I can fix it so no one can fix it!"
Ed & Wendy
2009 Georgetown 378TS | 1998 Jeep Wrangler | 1998 Skeeter ZX202C
Nights camped in 2009: 53 | Nights camped in 2010: 55
www.nwjeepn.com
NWJeeper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2009, 02:22 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
TulsaSteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Tulsa
Posts: 309
I agree with NWJeeper. Roadmaster seems to be the best right now. They don't bind and in my opinion that makes them safer.

Regarding tow dollies, I have no issue with them, but I do believe that towing with 4 wheels down has saved my bacon at least a few times.

My stopping distance is significantly shorter with the USGear braking system. I have 10 wheels braking vs. just 6 on the RV. My Saturn literally tugs the RV backwards when I'm braking hard.

You can't imagine how good that feels coming down a steep off ramp.

A way to save some cash and be sure you get exactly what you want is to buy the parts online (no dealer markup, save the sales tax and maybe get free shipping). Then pay a dealer to do the install.

Installing the tow brackets on my Saturn took an afternoon. I was by myself and I'm a bit anal when I work. I just put the car up on a pair of ramps, put some good tunes on the stereo and got to it. No special tools, but I did buy a new drill bit to make things go smoother.

The install of the US Gear system was a longer term project. I'm sure a dealer that does them all the time could knock it out in a few hours, but I took a slower approach. A few hours here and there until I had it dialed in. I also had a failed control module on the US gear system during the install.

Their tech support rocked. The website provided a step by step troubleshooting guide. I did those steps, e-mailed my results to US Gear and they sent a new module free of charge. Easy peasy.

$2500-$3500 isn't cheap, but you can use these parts for many years if you maintain them. So if you plan stay with the RV lifestyle for awhile, you can swap them over as you buy new RVs and/or new toads.
__________________
TulsaSteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2009, 11:36 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
NWJeeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Enumclaw, WA
Posts: 2,617
Steve mentioned having to drill to install the sytem on his Saturn, on the CRV it was a bolt up with no drilling required. Each vehicle is a bit different obviously but I was surprised at how easy it was with the CRV.
__________________
"I can fix it, and if I can't fix it, I can fix it so no one can fix it!"
Ed & Wendy
2009 Georgetown 378TS | 1998 Jeep Wrangler | 1998 Skeeter ZX202C
Nights camped in 2009: 53 | Nights camped in 2010: 55
www.nwjeepn.com
NWJeeper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2009, 01:07 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
TulsaSteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Tulsa
Posts: 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by NWJeeper View Post
Steve mentioned having to drill to install the sytem on his Saturn, on the CRV it was a bolt up with no drilling required. Each vehicle is a bit different obviously but I was surprised at how easy it was with the CRV.
Good point. I found kits from others that required no drilling on the Saturn Vue, but I decided to go with Roadmaster for other reasons. I had to drill 4 holes. Very easy to follow the instructions. Probably the hardest part was cutting the air damn just right so it still looked good.

Once I slide off the brackets, you have to look hard to see any of the work that I did. Roadmaster's kit is barely visible when not being used.
__________________
TulsaSteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2009, 03:38 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
ronhanson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Colorado
Posts: 322
I used a Blue Ox baseplate on my Ford Edge in conjunction with a ReadyBrute tow bar with integrated brake system. I am very happy with this setup.

Make sure to use Loctite on all those bolts and give them a check once in a while. I've read some accounts of them loosening up over time.
__________________

__________________
Ron Hanson
2009 Georgetown 350TS (bunks)
400W solar, 440AH 6V GC2
2009 Ford Edge AWD Ltd towed
2011 Honda Fit Sport towed
ronhanson is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




ForestRiverForums.com is not in any way associated with Forest River, Inc. or its associated RV manufacturing divisions.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:11 PM.